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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to hear from reloaders with experience with both the 650 and 1050, please. If you've never used a 1050, I would have to take the advice with a grain of salt. I'm looking to get my first progressive press, and regardless of the fact that I've read everything I can find on these two, I still can't decide.

I will be reloading .45 primarily. Probably a couple of hundred rounds a week; no more than 300. My current thinking is to continue reloading my .32 S&W Long LWCs on my single stage for the extra control it provides on what is a fussy target round (the wadcutters are difficult to seat because they're small and flat). I don't think they lend themselves to progressives, and I don't shoot more than 100 a week at most.

The 1050 sounds great in that it is apparently more accurate in seating primers, measuring powder, and provides more space for the fingers if you have to adjust a round on the way through. However, it is two or three times the cost of the 650. I can buy a lot of supplies with the price difference. Having said that, if the difference in price is worth it, I don't have a problem with spending the money one time and being done with it.

Thanks in advance for any advice you can give me!
 

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I bought a S1050 after looking at 550 and 650 when upgrading from a pair of SDBs.
It is in .45 ACP SWC.
Its assets are the primer pocket crimp swage and positive primer seating to a mechanical stop on the handle downstroke. None of this benchrest stuff about feeling the primer in place. Plus general heavy duty commercial construction. Its liabilities are a finicky primer feed that must be kept clean and adjusted, much more complex caliber change, higher price, and short warranty. Not that you are likely to need warranty work loading just for yourself. The powder measure is no more accurate than other Dillons', depends largely on powder granulation and consistent operation, just like any.

The operators at the commercial reloader where I got my S1050 had nothing good to say about the 650, but it was mostly in connection with the extra work required to keep a hobby machine running in a production line. I do not like what I have heard and read about the trick rotary primer feed. Many owners like them.

I went back and got a 550B for loading other calibers and even other lower volume .45 loads because the S1050 is intimidatingly complex (to me, NRA Mechanically Inept) and I did not want to fool with it other than operating maintenance.

I consider the 1050 to be a luxury machine for my application, bought instead of a new gun that year, and probably for yours. For 200-300 a week, consider a 550 and save the price and complication of the 650 or 1050.
 

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The 650 will do all you want and it will be much easier for caliber change. I have a 1050 set up for 45 ACP only as I shoot alot of 45. I also have 2 650s, one small primer and one large primer. I have 550 set up for the other calbers that I don't shoot alot of. Actually the 550 would probably suit you just fine and you would save some cash. The 550 is very easy to use. David
 

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Three hundred rounds a week is not all that much. I would think you would be well served by a 550B let alone a 650.

This link has been given out in the past in regards to helping people decide between Dillon presses. Here it is again, form the Brian Enos site. He sells the stuff too.Brian Enos' Dillon list.
 

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I have both a 1050 and a 650. I love them both and use them both for different calibers. You asked specifically about the two so here goes my opinion. If I were buying a press now, knowing what I do and having used both, I would buy the 650--or maybe two of them. The 650 is almost as fast and is as easy to use as the 1050. The 650 is much cheaper and much easier to convert between calibers.

Mine are set up side by side on my bench and I just switch the case feeder between the two. Good luck and enjoy reloading.
 

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I would buy a SDB if I was only going to load 300 rds a week. You can do that in an hour. I had a SDB now have a 1050 only because iIgot it used for $800.00 and my reloading sessions are usually long but few and far between. I don't think you can go wrong with a Dillon product
 

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I've had s SDB and didn't like it.

I have a 550B and a 650 complete w/case feeder set up for both LP and SP priming. I load .45 ACP and 9mmx19 on the 650 and all else on the 550B.

I like each one very much. You can turn out quality reloads with either.

I don't have a 1050 but I'm quite familiar with them. I do a lot of shooting and I used to do even more when shooting competition but, I couldn't see what a 1050 and the added $'s would do for me at the time that the 650 wouldn't so I bought the 650 and have never regretted my decision.

300 rounds a week is 550B usage, 650 at very best but they are a little more complex to change over and with an added cost over the 550B as far as parts.
 

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I agree with most of the others go for a 550 and save your money for more loading components. Also I load for over 15 different calibers on my 550 and you will have NO problem making good accurate ammo for your 32 SW Long.
 

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I have two 1050's and a 550. I agree with the others that 2-300 rds a week is more in the 550 range. I shoot USPSA every weekend (limited and open) as well as my son so thats why we have the different presses. FYI.....A "Professional " shooter I know has told me that he and some other pros would rather have the 550 than the 650. I have a friend with a 1050 and a 650 and he's looking for another 1050 to buy. Bottom line is that I too would suggest the 550 for your needs (E-Bay is the cheapest other than other shooters near by). In either case you will not be sorry. If your time is REALLY valuable (I have kids) then get a 1050. Good Luck!!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks so much for the informed input, guys!

I really did feel that the 550 was realistically all that I need, but then thought about all the raves about the 650 and never look back, etc. from users here who had moved up, and so questioned whether or not I should just step up to the 650 and be done with it. This led to comparisons with the 1050 (including the Brian Enos site) and how much better it was than the 650. So now I'm being tempted by something WAY more expensive than the 550, and feeling like I'm torn between the 550 and the 1050, which was very confusing. I'm not afraid to get the best if I'm going to get value for it.

I feel better now. I think the 550 is going to do me fine.

Thanks again.
 

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550 For Sure!

I load about 300 rounds per week of .45 ACP. dillon 550 pumps them out as fast as I can pull the handle. simple to use, can switch to .38/357, 38 S&W, 9mm and .41 LC real fast with no problems.

Dillon is the best equipment around and the life time warranty is for real. I can attest to that. Tech support is outstanding. check out where I live vs where AZ is. Been to their factory - nice people. Great catalogue - the covers that is!
 

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I am with 196PC. My time is very valuable and hard to come by. Thats why I got a 1050.

After you change toolheads a few times, its very simple. Takes all of maybe 10 minutes.

I would rather be at the range shooting than at the bench reloading.

That said, I also have a 550 and a SL900 on my bench. My 550 just loads 454 and 41 anymore.

A good friend has a 650, likes it, but kicks himself for not getting a 1050. He even comes over to my place to load 223 and 9x19.

Spend the cash once and get it over with. And, resale value on 1050's and most all Dillon presses is good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
See, Tom, that's exactly what I meant by my being in a dilemma: "all you really need is a 550, but you'll kick yourself for not getting a 650 if you do that, and the 1050 is way better than a 650." So suddenly instead of about $700 CDN I'm looking at $2500. It just sounds like overkill to me for maybe 300 rounds a week. I appreciate the thoughts, and you may well be right, but I think I will start with the 550 and see. If I decide to upgrade, I should be able to get a good return on the 550 later on and have no problem selling it.
 

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or your gonna do what I did.......get a 550, keep it and get a 1050.......keep both and get another 1050.........keep all three and look around for another 1050..........(no joke!!).........The cool thing is that after awhile the wife has NO CLUE what you have any more.........
 

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I'll start by warning that I don't yet own a Dillon.

I went through a similar delema to yours but I was shopping between the Lee Load Master and the Dillon XL 650. I ended up getting the Load Master for Christmas as a gift.

In about 10000 rounds I've worn out about $40 in parts on it but had managed some patchwork repairs to keep from needing to get a new carrier saving $25 of that at least for a while. It took me about 5 years to accumulate that many reloads.

At 300 a week you're doing nearly 16k a year, If I were loading as much as you I'd be all over the 650. The only justification to bump up to the 1050 I can think of is if you needed more than the 5 die stations on the XL 650 or you want the primer swagging for military brass.

The price differance between it and the 1050 can be put to good use elsewhere that will enhance your shooting experiance and save you time reloading. Caliber change kits, a Lyman DPS1200, components, ect . . .

If you were loading a lower volume or changing calibers more often I'd say go with the 550.
 

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You might try going to the Bullsye-L website and going to the e-scribe (archived) section and do a search for 1050. This topic has been talked through a lot buy fellows who load and shoot a lot of match and practice ammo. You might also go to www.brianenos.com and go to the forum section and read the "Which Dillon is for me?" article. Also, go to Yahoo and enter "1050" and Palma" and you should find an artice about reloading on a 1050 for the U.S. Palma Rifle Team.

Now for my two cents worth. Nobody who is not a commercial reloader (in my humble opinion) needs a 1050. That said, I am not a commercial reloader and I own four of them along with extra toolheads, shellplates, etc. (I've gotten really good deals on a couple of used ones that I had to clean up) I am still fond of the Star machines that I started out on but have owned Dillon RL-300's, 450's, 550's, 650's and the 1050's that I mentioned. I have no experience with the new Super 1050.

I load my Bullseye, PPC and 32 S&W WC ammo on Star machines, 45 Major loads, .223, .40 S&W and .38 Super on the 1050's. I have two 550's set up with large and small priming systems and load miscellaneous and small runs of everything else (that I don't single stage) on them.

The 1050 primes on the downstroke, has a swaging station and is much easier (due to it's size) to get fingers into and deal with problems should they arise. I never got the priming system on a 650 to work to my satisfation. The shellplate is too small for my fingers to get into the machine with problems that arose much more often for me on the 650 than the 550.

My free time is extremely limited and very dear to me. I don't try to see how fast I can go but easily knock out 1,200-1,400 rounds in a couple of hours. I reload one afternoon per month. The 1050 has grown on me and I have found it to be a great machine. If I had it to do all again starting from scratch......1050 and wouldn't look back.

Good Luck

Marvin

P.S. 196PC is absolutely right, she has no clue what all that junk in my reloading room is!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I already ordered a 550 before the last couple of replies came in, and feel that I made the right choice; at least for a few years. I enjoy time spent reloading and don't need to produce 1000 rounds at a time, so the 1050 -- although great -- is overkill by a mile at this time. I do think that when the time comes for auto-indexing, I will step up to the plate and go for the 1050 over the 650. Thanks to all.
 

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Great move, you'll be amazed at how flexible and fast the 550 is.

Good luck, Max :)
 
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