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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering stripping back the tatty finish on my 1911 frame and refinishing it.

I was thinking of trying Birchwood Casey's Perma Blue paste kit. Has anyone tried this?

I'm a bit worried about the finish looking patchy or streaky. I would be glad of any advice or tips for getting a good finish with this product. Also, if anyone has any links or photos of finished projects which have used the Perma Blue paste, I would be very grateful.

I'm in the UK, so I don't really have the same options to have the frame treated to a nice proprietry finish.

Thanks
 

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This is my Colt/Caspiam I refinshed with the paste you're considering. You can get it to look pretty good but it takes a lot of work. One of the main things is to get all of the oil off.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
This is my Colt/Caspiam I refinshed with the paste you're considering. You can get it to look pretty good but it takes a lot of work. One of the main things is to get all of the oil off.
Thanks for the input, that looks great!

Do you mind me asking what you used to clean the oil off, and what did you use to apply the paste?
 

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Just remember that cold blue will wear off or turn brown quickly from handling, no matter how careful you are in applying it. Brownell's Oxpho Blue and Birchwood Casey's Super Blue are probbly the two most durable, but I still never use them for anything more than simple touch-up of scratches or small worn areas.
 

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I think I used Simple Green or Purple Power to remove the oil. As dsk stated no matter how good you get it to look its not going to last as long as hot bluing.
 

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The biggest problem I have with cold bluing is the smell of sulfer or "rotten eggs." I would go with spray on gunkote or else a rust blue that you can DIY. I have seen formulas on the Internet for home hot bluing using salts from the hardware store, but I have not tried it.

Personally, I would rather have a tatty gun with character.

Good Luck.
 

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You can find the chemicals at Lowe's to do a good hot blue job -- but you have to have the pans, a heat source, personal protective equipment, etc. and a WELL ventilated area!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I asked a similar question on a couple of other forums. A few people recommended Norrell's Moly Resin. It looks like it might take a bit of effort to do but the finish seems to be quite durable. I was thinking of the semi-gloss black for the frame. I'm not sure about the slide.

See http://www.johnnorrellarms.com/default.asp

That said, I'm a bit of a traditionalist and like a nice deep blued finish. Has anyone successfully tried hot-bluing at home, or know where I can find out more about the process?

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I used Blindhogg's formula for hot blueing and got great results, follow the directions to the letter and you will have no problems.... Just remember that if you want a deeper blue that means more polishing/finishing.

 
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