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Here is what I did.

Removed trigger parts.

Held hammer in a smooth jawed small high precision vise.
Can be had for 20 dollars from Harbor frieght.

Took a feeler gage .021 and layed in on the hammer in front of the hooks to limit the cut. It also gives you a guide to cut evenly.

Then I took a superduper hard fine stone( polishing stone for knives) and cut the hooks down to .021 keeping the angle that was there to begin with.

Then I grabbed the sear chucked it up in the smooth jawed little vise putting the engagement surface even with the top of the vise and kepted the same angle on the edge. Then just touched it to polish the engagement surface.

Took just a tiny bit of tension off the first leaf of the trigger leaf spring. ( very tiny amount ). You could barely tell the difference by looking.

Dropped in a 19 Lb Wolf mainspring.

Cleaned parts put the gun back together function tested the gun and boosted the trigger 5 times.

Trigger gage said 3.5 lbs. No creep at all. Entire process to less than 2O mins. Dry fired the gun 200 times and weighed the trigger again. Still at 3.5 lbs and feels fine. Can not get the hammer to follow down no matter how hard I let the slide drop.

Ok Gun Smith guys tell me why this system is bad? What am I missing here?

Jim
 

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Only problem I could see is if the parts are only surface hard, they may eventually wear. Only time and shooting will tell. Otherwise, you seem to have done OK.

You might want to get some Kasenit from Brownells to harden parts after working on them.

Jim
 

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Jim,
Any current production quality hammer, sear or disconnector
is hardened all the way through.
Subjecting a sear to the Kasenite process, heating to cherry red and quenching in water, is a poor idea.
Depending on the steel type used, it could produce a very, very
hard and brittle sear which could catastrophically fail.
I'd urge anyone that doubts the 'as manufactured' hardness of their sear to simply purchase a known quality piece.
Safety is well worth the $25.
 
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