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We have probably all seen it, usually it's the guy and trying to clear his gun at a match. I usually just start backing up.
Well a few matches ago one of our top shooters was shooting PCC with his MPX and it took him 12 shots to notice nothing was coming out.
Glad is wasn't a pistol.
I think that barrel is done though.

MPXSquib.jpg
 

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Barrel is toast... would love to see a cross section of that thing ... 12 bullets stacked.
 

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years ago, saw a sectioned muzzleloading Civil War musket, and the barrel was plugged with something like 12 or more mini-balls. In the heat of battle some trooper just kept loading and loading. NV
 

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That happened only once thanks God, several years ago with a S&W Mod 14K Full Lug.
I realize straight away that I had a squib, and the stuck bullet was removed with a brass rod and a hammer.
 
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I've witnessed a dozen or more squibs, some sounded like "pffft", and some sounded like full rounds.
Most left the bullet close enough to the chamber that a live round could not be chambered behind it.
It must be more difficult to detect with revolvers, as I watched a guy keep shooting until the last bullet blocked cylinder rotation, and none of the other shooters in the gallery was aware anything was wrong.
 

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That happened only once thanks God, several years ago with a S&W Mod 14K Full Lug.
I realize straight away that I had a squib, and the stuck bullet was removed with a brass rod and a hammer.
When first taking up shooting a handgun, ‘80 or ‘81, I bought a Llama .357 revolver and buying most practice ammunition from a hand-loading co-worker: .357 cast wad-cutters, loaded to very light .38spl pressures*, @$.03. A little range set up on my back porch; some targets very unwisely chosen.

Firing one shot, it sounded and felt strange and no visible impact. But I was very young and firearm ignorant. Fired again; again felt strange and again no visible impact ... strange ... even then I didn’t often miss the target. Scowling [ no doubt ] I tried to thumb the hammer back ... no joy. The previous bullet was stuck across the cylinder-barrel gap. The bullet before had stopped it. Using a cleaning rod, I drove the last bullet back into the cylinder: now it could be opened and drive the 2nd-to-last bullet out. Only fired one squib since: a Winchester White-Box .38spl ... also in a .357 magnum revolver. That one, ca 2010, I noticed.


*- or, thank God, even less
#)8- o
 

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Well a few matches ago one of our top shooters was shooting PCC with his MPX and it took him 12 shots to notice nothing was coming out.
Was it cycling the bolt or did he rack the action 12 times before he realized something was wrong?
What was the RO doing all this time?
 

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and some sounded like full rounds.
Most left the bullet close enough to the chamber that a live round could not be chambered behind it.
I've had one squib ever and didn't know it... the only reason I didn't hurt anything was like you said- the bullet stuck so close, it prevented the next live round from being able to fully chamber.

I've thought of setting a few up just to see if I could develop a feel/ear for it but don't like the idea of pounding them out each time. Maybe if I get a cheapo gun, I'll do that.
 

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If you are wearing good ear muffs it's basically a non-event.
You pulled the trigger and nothing happened.

That's one of the things I really emphasize in my Basic Pistol Course.

If you pull the trigger and nothing happened - STOP!

Find out why before attempting to fire again.
Maybe the magazine wasn't seated and didn't feed a round into the chamber.
Or maybe a lot of other things that would be harmless.

But MAYBE the round fired and the bullet didn't leave the barrel.
Now you have a blocked bore and firing again would be really bad.
So don't - until you know what happened.
 

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I've had about 5-6 squibs. Fortunately all were caught due to lack of sound, lack of recoil. or lack of ejection. After a couple of years of pondering how I could occasionally produce a no powder round, I decided it was due to my procedure when something went wrong on my 550. Up till then I would just "fix" the problem and go on. Fortunately, I never got a double charge, but did get the occasional squib. Now, when there's a problem, all cases come out of the shell plate, the problem is fixed, and then each case is examined before being replaced in the shell holder.
 

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Going through my Firearms Training the Instructor had us perform a "Tap-Rack-Bang Drill" over and over. He would insert dummy rounds into our magazines and put us through a timed shoot. When the hammer fell on a dummy round you had to tap-rack-bang before you could finish the drill. I always wondered is this practice could lead to firing another round on top of a squib. The answer is is could. I met the instructor a few years later and mentioned the drill and possible consequences to him. His answer was, the tap-rack-bang drill is designed to be used in a life threatening situation when you do not have time to properly check your weapon. Further more he said the drill should only be used if NOTHING happens when the trigger is pulled. Should you get a pop, a fizzle, greatly reduced recoil, or failure to eject, go for your backup weapon or retreat to safety.

Always check your weapon when a round does not sound right, feel right, of just fizzles.

My $0.02
Grumpy
 

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I've had one squib ever and didn't know it... the only reason I didn't hurt anything was like you said- the bullet stuck so close, it prevented the next live round from being able to fully chamber.

I've thought of setting a few up just to see if I could develop a feel/ear for it but don't like the idea of pounding them out each time. Maybe if I get a cheapo gun, I'll do that.
cheapo barrel. And there's really no risk to even to the barrel : just use a soft-ish driver, e.g. wood. Bullets going the wrong way, yes, but a very short distance, very low pressure and very slowly.
 

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If you are wearing good ear muffs it's basically a non-event.
You pulled the trigger and nothing happened.

That's one of the things I really emphasize in my Basic Pistol Course.

If you pull the trigger and nothing happened - STOP!

Find out why before attempting to fire again.
Maybe the magazine wasn't seated and didn't feed a round into the chamber.
Or maybe a lot of other things that would be harmless.

But MAYBE the round fired and the bullet didn't leave the barrel.
Now you have a blocked bore and firing again would be really bad.
So don't - until you know what happened.
My old classroom had a once-beautiful, S&W .357, once-revolver: except for brand and caliber, it looked much like this:


.. for use in demonstrating the hazards of firing another round after a squib.
 

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I have had three and in all three I knew right away something was wrong. There was always a failure to eject
 

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I had one squib many years ago in a Ruger Blackhawk 45 Colt. It was very obvious. Just heard a pftttt. Semi jacketed round was about an inch in to the barrel. I couldn't get it out with a wooden dowel. Had to take it to a gun smith and he said he had trouble with it, but did manage to remove the bullet. I must have missed the powder load when I reloaded it, so just the primer.
 

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Only experienced one squib, but yes I knew it. The pistol didn't cycle, but a spent case was still in the chamber. Fortunately, i checked the bbl before trying to chamber a new round.
 

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Never had a squib myself that I did not immediately notice. Most of my loads are hotter than average though, so it's easy to tell. (Usually IPSC Major PF above 172, or even above 140PF in Minor.)

I DO shoot with a guy who uses a revolver with a dot in Steel, and he loads SO light that it's sometimes hard to tell. (We call his caliber a "38 Squib" or "38 Wisper".) He's had at least 4 squibs while I was RO, and since it's a revolver, they have to go ALL THE WAY back down a 6" barrel, because you can't get a squib rod into the breech end. Started carrying a tiny hammer in my range bag, JUST so we could hammer the bullets back down from the muzzle end.
 
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