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I've had a small tube of blue Locktite for about 5 years. I just used it on my Ruger Hunter front sight and scope base but the screws keep coming loose. Yes, I degreased the screw holes and the screws before applying Locktite. Would red Locktite would be to strong for these type of screws? What about using nail polish to keep screws from coming loose?
 

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go bad? - not that I know of. I have some tubes of both red and blue, a couple of which are at least 10 years old, and they still work fine.
 

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It is possible for the locktite to "settle out" after a while in the tube. Unless you mix it up completely before you use it you would just be applying the carrier (solvent). Make sure that it is very well mixed before you use it. I would not use the red - but that is just my opinion.
 

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Would red Locktite would be to strong for these type of screws? What about using nail polish to keep screws from coming loose?
I had to use RED on my Ruger MK III front sight. Same problem as you with BLUE...
 

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Shake or mix the Loctite.

Use lacquer thinner or Acetone to degrease the screws and holes.

Drop the screws in a cup with Acetone or thinner, and use a CLEAN pipe cleaner with thinner to clean out the holes.
Dry the screws and the holes of all thinner.

Apply a drop of Loctite into the holes, QUICKLY screw the screws down snug, then use a screwdriver or an Allen bit in a screwdriver handle to push DOWN firmly on the screws while you apply torque to them.

HOLDING the torque on the screw, give the screw head a sharp rap with a plastic screwdriver handle.
The downward pressure and torque followed by the "rap" will rupture any air pocket in the hole, AND will mate the threads on the screws and the holes.
When you give the screw a rap, the screw will actually turn a slight amount more.

NOTE: A sharp rap, NOT a hard blow.

Allow 24 hours for the Loctite to fully cure.
Done this way, they won't come loose.

DO NOT use Loctite Red. It's for permanent installation, and you will have trouble getting the screws out if you ever need to.
 

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I hope not. The bottle of blue I am working on, which is 3/4 gone, is at least 7 years old. I will give it a good shake next time, but probably haven't in some time. It still works as I used it to glue a front sight recently that has eaten 300-500 rounds since.
 

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DO NOT use Loctite Red. It's for permanent installation, and you will have trouble getting the screws out if you ever need to.
Red is not necessarily 'permanent'. Clean up the threads and screw with lighter fluid or some other oil free solvent. Wet the top half of the screw threads with the red Loctite and install it. If you need to remove your front sight, a proper screwdriver fit and a little elbow grease usually does it. If that doesn't pop it loose, some heat applied to the screw head with a 30-40 watt small tip soldering iron should loosen things up. Blue Locktite works for most gun screw applications but I still prefer red for sights....I'd rather work to get them off if need be then have them fly off at a match or some other inopportune moment...:(
 

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Loctite does, in fact, have a shelf life. I found out the hard way when I bought a relatively large bottle of this miracle fluid, onlt to have it go bad. Buy the smallest bottle you can get away with and dump it after a couple of years or so, just to be safe.

PS If you are using the stronger version (red) and want the best bond possible, use the Loctite Primer. It isn't cheap, but it really improves the bond.
 

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One more thing - never let your locktite freeze. The cold seems to separate it and it will never completely mix again. If you live where there is cold winters, make sure that it is stored inside. Although I don't know for sure, extreme heat may do the same.:confused:

AC
 

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I found that using 99% Isopropyl alcohol as the final cleaner before applying the Loctite removes any residue and also seems to speed up the cure. The alcohol is available at most major chain drug stores and is a very good final wash for paint etc.
 

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I concur with Gammon. It does go bad. I usually toss mine after 2 years, but in the aircraft industry machine shops, one year and it's gone, according to some of my aircraft machinst friends.

Bob
 

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Yes, loctite does have a self life(to many years in aircraft work). You CAN make it last allot longer buy keeping it your refridgerator and when you go to use it, shake the crap out of it for about a minute.
LG
 

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Most people don't realize this but the color isn't the only factor with loctite.
As an industrial machinist I have catalogs that list multiple types of "red" loctite that are all completely different in use and application.

Personaly I would want a more permanent type of loctite on a gun, although I have used "blue" type loctite before because it was all I had available, I would preffer a "red" type when it comes to gun use, recoil can really shake things loose at the worst possible time.
 
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