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I was recently chatting with one of the custom gunsmiths who works for Wilson Combat and he said that WC uses their bore polish compound to hand-lap all their guns, so that there is no need for a "break in" period.
I know most high-end custom rifles have hand-lapped barrels that polish out all machining imperfections and make them as smooth and accurate as possible.
Does anyone know for certain whether Ed Brown hand-laps their 1911 barrels as WC does?
 

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My Ed Brown Custom Executive Elite. Received it late 2014.



First three shots at 25 yards.



20 round group (actually 2 10-round strings) at a smidgen over 25 yards.



I think the Brown barrels work pretty darn well!
 

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Wilson pistols have a 500 round break in.

There is even a specific recommendation for what weight 9mm bullets to use during the Wilson 500 round break in. Around 124 grain is recommended due to the weak recoil of that caliber in 115 grain.

Both Wilson and Brown make accurate guns.

i doubt that the two companies are going to tell you how they build, but you could call Brown and ask what they do.
 

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I was recently chatting with one of the custom gunsmiths who works for Wilson Combat and he said that WC uses their bore polish compound to hand-lap all their guns, so that there is no need for a "break in" period.
I know most high-end custom rifles have hand-lapped barrels that polish out all machining imperfections and make them as smooth and accurate as possible.
Does anyone know for certain whether Ed Brown hand-laps their 1911 barrels as WC does?
That is not the suggestion given when you buy a new pistol from them. If true, not that they lap but that break in isn't needed, maybe he should talk with Mr Wilson and change their recommendation of 300-500 round break in.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1IuM8DPCN1_PHqfWZFNGxzNGl7LdKF_T4TNNtpl6OCZ8/edit?pli=1

I suggest posting this on the Wilson forum and see what kind of a response you get.
 

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Given the quality of today's barrels I doubt that they would find it necessary.

Tool marks in a barrel can be perfectly benign. Those that aren't are usually remnants of the drilling or reaming operations and are at right angles to the rifling. That process can do a lot to get rid of circular marks
 

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I don't believe WC calls for a brake in period with there 1911s(45 anyway, no idea about 9 Minnie mouse). Wilson and Brown fire between 80-90 rounds of several types of ammo in different ways before they ship it out. What Wilson does recommend is that you don't field strip and clean the gun in the first 500 rounds. You can strap it on and carry on duty as soon as you get it, they prove its good to go before it leaves there shop.
 

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I don't believe WC calls for a brake in period with there 1911s(45 anyway, no idea about 9 Minnie mouse). Wilson and Brown fire between 80-90 rounds of several types of ammo in different ways before they ship it out. What Wilson does recommend is that you don't field strip and clean the gun in the first 500 rounds. You can strap it on and carry on duty as soon as you get it, they prove its good to go before it leaves there shop.
Says break in.

Answer from Wilson's FAQ

Shoot a minimum of 300- 500 rounds of full charge ammunition through your pistol prior to disassembly and cleaning for the first time. Keep your custom pistol well lubricated throughout this Break-In period.
 

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Indeed it does, but has nothing to do with the operation of the handgun(dose not need it for functional purposes)and everything to do with allowing the parts to sync with each other for optimal performance. Many do not follow this recommendation.
So yes it is a brake in period, but not the kind most are use to when it comes to 1911s.
 

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You're just lapping all of the high spots (there won't be many) with powder residue and oil. Wilson and Brown guns will run right out of the box. They get smoother after you run them in.
 

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My last Wilson, a Sentinel 9mm, had 1 in 7 feeding problems.

I was told by Wilson to finish the 500 round break in period with hotter ammo and see how it ran, which I did.

Just as I told them, the gun had too strong a recoil spring and they replaced the spring and ejector after the gun did not run for them, either, after 500 rounds. Wilson also gave me some freebies for my trouble.

Bottom line, it sure looked and reads like a break in period to me.
 

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I think you'll find that modern barrels are so internally smooth that this kind of lapping really isn't required. ECM rifled barrels are amazingly smooth and consistent. Brown also Cryo treats their barrels. That's one of the reasons I buy them for certain situations.
 

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Not related specifically to lapping of the barrels, but to break-in generally -- Brown has stated in the past that they fire each pistol 200 rounds before sending it out from the factory. That may be one reason they don't need to recommend a break-in period (plus their quality manufacturing).

https://forums.1911forum.com/showthread.php?t=269112&highlight=200+rounds
 
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