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Okay, I have heard that you shouldnt drop the slide on an empty chamber, this would be a Do Not. I have had a trigger job done and it is very nice. It is crisp and clean, and I am wondering what, if anything, would potentially undo this perfection (dry-firing, dropping hammer to helf-cock, etc)? Any other helpful Do's and Do Not's that would help me maintain my 1911 woud be greatly appreciated.
 

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Don't load by dropping rounds into the chamber. Load them in a magazine, and cycle them from there. Dropping the slide onto a round in the chamber can break the extractor.
 

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what pound trigger pull do you you have?buy a snap cap and fire away, I can't see how dropping the hammer would effect anything
:barf:
 

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In addition to the above good suggestions, I think that dropping the hammer against the half-cock notch would batter the sear edge.

Warmly, Col. Colt

"Beware of Counterfeits & Patent Infringements" - Samuel Colt, mid-1850's Colt newspaper Ad. Even more true 150 years latter!
 

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Wilson Combat and others have recommended holding the trigger back when you release the slide.

This keeps the hammer and sear from damaging each other ruining a crisp - light trigger pull.

Some people express concern but the trigger is held back each time you shoot the gun, that is, the slide cycles before you can release the trigger.

I have always held the trigger back when I release the slide with a full magazine or when I cycle the slide after I clean and lube to get the lubricant distributed.

Many thousands of rounds later and my triggers are perfect - crisp and the weight of pull hasn't changed.
 

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Sorry, if I could just interject here, the practice of pulling the trigger while dropping the slide is probably not the advice you want to give someone who's asking for advice on the internet.

Anybody who tries it better make sure they are at least following all the "other" Do's and Dont's (the safety rules.)
 

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"Sorry, if I could just interject here, the practice of pulling the trigger while dropping the slide is probably not the advice you want to give someone who's asking for advice on the internet."

The same thing occured to me.

Holding the hammer back while dropping the slide is dandy for preserving your nice "trigger job", but it's really pertinent only when dropping the slide on an empty chamber, without a loaded magazine in place.
(Dropping the slide with a loaded magazine in place probably produces sufficient slide retardation via cartridge loading that the sear won't be harmed.)

Making it a habit to always be pressing the trigger and dropping the slide brings to my imagination the scenario of holding trigger back...dropping slide...releasing trigger just enough that the disconnector resets...holding trigger back some more...BOOM.

This couldn't happen to anyone here, of course, but I was thinkin' of those other guys...
 

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The practice of holding the trigger while chambering the first round comes from the use of extremely (too!) light trigger pulls, where just dropping the slide can cause the trigger to move back and drop the hammer to the half cock notch, not good for a very fine sear adjustment. It is, IMHO, a dangerous practice and will get you thrown off some ranges.

Some smiths will put on very light pulls that are dangerous in themselves. IMO, anything less than 3 pounds is too light and even 4 pounds is too light in a defense gun that might be used in a stressful situation.

I expect flames from the guys who have a .00000042 ounce trigger pull and fire the gun by blowing on it, but I like all my pieces and parts very much and don't like to lose any.

Jim
 

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dry firing a 1911 isn't bad for it is it?I have a light trigger pull ,
than a Ruger single action Blachawk .44 which has a heavier
trigger pull, I had no smith work on my 1911, just good parts, fitted well,bought all inards best, bought a cheap Colt grip safety
which I replaced with a Ed Brown or some other, but do you guys
try to catch the hammer after each shot so the hammer doesn't
fall?????????? I couldn't own a gun that was so delcate, I think
there is more forward energy on slide when fired than when dropped from
stop. so why hold the hammer?:confused::barf:
 

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As a shooter , it is a very, very bad habit to put your trigger finger on the trigger until the time you're ready & going to fire( Gun safety rule no. 2 ) as the others said some range might expel you or be DQ'd during competition . Even if you say that you're just cleaning or routinely checking your gun it will become a habit & eventually be subconsciously memorized by your muscle.

In a stressful situation you might do the reverse procedure that is , drop the slide and pull the trigger would certainly spell you DISASTER..... Better avoid it , that's for your good.

Better to replace your sear or hammer occasionaly than to be sorry for the rest of your life. Be safe .

Regards ,

Hermo Gut:)
 

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DQ

Just having your finger inside the trigger guard after the load and make ready command and before the start signal will get you a quick DQ in IPSC/USPSA under rule 10.3.11. If the gun was to fire, then you still get DQed, but this time under rule 10.3.2.1.

Just a horrible practice that will get you thrown off the range at our local gun club.
 
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