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On a previous thread, someone was talking about getting an EGW square bottom oversized firing pin stop with .060-.070 bevel as a modification. Why would you want to do that, rather than keep the factory unit??? I have never had a problem with a FP stop ever, and I've been shooting them for over 30 years, including competition. :confused:

I have a pair of enhanced SS Gov't Models, and even with a 16# spring, and 24# MS, they still throw the empties about 10 feet away. I assume the FP stop will retard the slide opening enough to reduce the slide velocity and make the ejection a little milder..is this correct..??:scratch: Would that be the reason to get them..??

If that's so, I should order a box of them and put them in all my guns...right?:)
 

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greco said:
Wow! Thanks! Time to order a few.:)

It's unfortunate that the Mfg.'s of today still use the modified design. It was only put into use due to horse mounted soldiers that were carrying hammer down on an empty chamber complaining that it was too hard to rack a round with the original designed firing pin stop. It makes no sense to continue to use the modified design unless we all are going to mount up and carry hammer down on an empty chamber...The square bottom stop with the slight bevel IS that good...C'mon Colt, SA, and the rest of ya lets go back to the original design!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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I bought two in case I messed up the first one- which I did. With mike in hand, the second fit perfectly with about 30 minutes work. I can't say the gun feels like a 9mm, as someone said elsewhere, but the recoil is reduced. I won't go back.

Chuck
 

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I have installed them on all my 1911s and there is a noticeable difference in felt recoil and barrel flip. For $12 a pop and maybe 15 minutes of your time these are a pretty good investment IMO. The M1911.org site has an excellent thread on this topic!
 

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jhe888 said:
Do they have a similar effect on a 9mm 1911? Does EGW make one for a 9mm? A Kimber 9mm, in particular.
I think it depends on how your gun is sprung and your loads. I switched the stop in and out with an almost square one and a tapered one on my 9mm. I ran drills over and over against a timer and found that my splits were consistently slower with the almost square stop. I run the tapered one now. It's still an EGW for a good tight fit. It was in a Kimber.
 

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IMO they are needed in a 45 Super or 10 mm Auto, or perhaps in a short barrelled 45, but not in a normal 5" 45. I have never seen they add any velocity to any given load.

You can always play with it and see if you like the feel. I like the standard one. For me ejection 10' feet away is perfect, I don't like brass just dropping at my feet :)
 

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Hello,

I was woundering if this would have a purpose on a 1911 made for carring
that needs to be 100 percent reliable, other then being oversized to hold the extractor and firingpin better.

Thanks Scott
 

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The five guns I have them in are same reliability wise as they were before...I will not own an unreliable gun.
 

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Hello,

I guess I should of asked what the advantage would be for the modification on a carrie 1911. It was stated what it was for a target and IPSC 1911 that it slowed the slide so you can make major with a reduced load,and quick double taps.
But what about factory defense ammo, does it raise the pressures or maybe not enough to worry about.
I don't know I'm trying to learn.

Thanks Scott
 

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Not enough to worry about. Per John Harrison in reply to my same question a while back (paraphrased, mistakes are mine). . .

The squared edge puts the point of contact between the FP stop and the hammer a smidge lower than on a rounded over FP stop, closer to the hammer's pivot point. This does cause a slight delay due to slightly increased force to cock the hammer.

I will tell you that the standard 1911 I had John work on for me is as accurate as my Nighthawk, and is actually the most pleasant of my .45s to shoot. It's a result of everything John did, I'm sure, but I believe the FP stop is definitely part of the equation.
 

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I believe the advantage to the square stop and a 23 lb mainspring is you don't need to "up" the recoil spring to 18.5 or higher, for example, that many people recommend for hardball or hotter. So, you can use the 16lb or lighter, depends on the load, which reduces the "dip" of a heavy recoil spring on "return". Also, the heavy recoil spring, when chambering, smacks the barrel feet(lugs) harder on the slide stop pin causing additional "shock" to the parts and slide stop frame hole. And, heavier recoil springs mean "faster" return to battery which is timed to magazine springs which have to keep up with the slide to feed properly.

Everything is connected. ;)

That's what I read and it sounds plausable. Might be worth a try. But, if someone is not so inclined for a carry gun, just stick to the "original" specs of ammo(power level), 7- round mag, 16 lb spring in a good 1911 and "be done with it". :D
 

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I have been wanting to put this in my Springfield Compact.. currently awaiting a reply to an e-mail to George (his hours, and my hours make calling difficult), but might as well ask on here.

I have a 2003 build Springfield Compact. 4" barrel, with the dual recoil spring dealie, and a titanium firing pin, which I believe is a different size than a normal firing pin. Do I need the series 80 part, or the series 70 part?

What about springs? I have the dual recoil spring.. should I look at changing the main one out?
 
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