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Discussion Starter #1
Finally broke down and got an Emerson Hard Wear folder, Endeavor version with plain edge.

These are knockoffs of Emerson's made in USA Raven, except since they are made or licensed by Emerson they aren't technically knockoffs. First impression is it looks cheap (even has some untrimmed fibers on the composit handle). BUT it's made in that Mecca of knife makers, Seki City Japan, not in Taiwan or China.

On second impression, it's VERY well thought out. I'll post more detailed comments after I've had it for a few days.
 

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How is the warrenty compared to a regular Emerson? I just bought a super 7 and sent it off to be customized. I will post pics when I get it back in a couple of weeks. Hard to beat an Emerson. Unless its my Striders.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
ghostrider1 said:
How is the warrenty compared to a regular Emerson? I just bought a super 7 and sent it off to be customized. I will post pics when I get it back in a couple of weeks. Hard to beat an Emerson. Unless its my Striders.
It's only a $60 or so knife, it's not from their semi-custom shop in L.A. So manufacturing quality isn't the same as their shop work. It is pinned, not hex'd together, for example, although I prefer pinned - it should never accidentally loosen up and come apart.

On the other hand, it's got Emerson's design DNA all over it, which is what separates it from Cold Steel (Voyager spear/tanto) and Spyderco (Endura, Delica).

What I like about it so far is the lightweight - 2.6 ounces on the office postal scale, and that was with a rubber band wrapped around it (to prevent accidental opening, my occasional worry with all these modern knives with big holes or studs to catch in clothing); and the thin handles. Also the "notch" in the handle for a finger grip. The blade is disgustingly shiny, but that's the norm for Cold Steel/Spyderco too. I suppose you could use it as an emergency reflector in the wilderness, like a mirror. No kidding.

I like the use of an opening hole instead of a nob (nothing to limit the utility of the blade itself); the notches or serrations along the spine on the handle and partly up the back of the blade. It feels snug and secure, in a variety of grip styles.

It has a mid-back lock release (and I prefer lockbacks to liner locks) which doesn't appear susceptible to accidental release from a tight grip, although it lacks the clever semi-crescent cutout (the "Boye Dent") found on Spydero releases these days.

The blade geometry appears good, more in tune with slicing in the kitchen than hacking trees to make tent pegs, and the blade back isn't overly thick for its length. This wouldn't be out of place at a picnic outing, although the blade is wide and hence there is a lot of shiny scary metal on view. On the other hand the nice checkering (it's not a check design, but you know what I mean) on the handle, the indentation in the handle for a secure grip, the notches where your thumb might go, all indicate that this would make a good improvisational weapon if the need should arise.

It would make an excellent gift for any friend in the military overseas - light enough to carry, thin enough to stick somewhere, grippy enough to reduce the risk of self-inflicted cuts from slipping, and useful for fixing food and opening packages and, if the need arose, minimal self defense (minimal by the standards of a soldier, anyway).

The Cold Steel Voyagers are less useful for everyday tasks (the Tanto is better suited as a weapon than as a tool; the Clip Point has too thick or too short or too long a blade - 3" or 4" with nothing in between). The Endura has an odd shaped blade, but you can't argue with the quality of constuction or with the quality of the steel). This Endeavor from Emerson is 3.5 inches, a nice in between size, and has nice look to it.

If you are a fan of Emersons, this "Emerson lite" might make you as happy as it's making me.
 

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I will not buy Cold STEAL yes I spelled it that way on purpose. Lynn has directly copied the Strider HT and is slamming Mick in his marketing such product as well. Striders, Emerson, or Chris reeves for me. Glad you like the newest addition to your stable and thanks for the reply.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
The Emerson Hard Wear Endeavor is a Keeper

One of my better "mass production" knives. Better blade shape than the Cold Steel Voyager Clip point, and sized in between the diminutive medium Voyager and oversized large Voyager. Blade is not too thick at the spine.

Spyderco continues to have tons of fans for their Endura/Delica, which have been around since the dawn of time, but I find the blade shape a little odd.

The two big pluses on the Endeavor are the thinness of the handle, and the finger grip cut-out.

Hard to find and not a big fan base, so I don't think they are selling well, but they are well designed, well-made, and reasonably priced for what you get.
 

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hard wear...

I picked up an Emerson "traveler" from the hard wear line a few years ago and only carried it a few times. The action is miserable, the steel is mediocre, and the clip broke off quickly. It is in my toolbox to serve duty as an expensive sharpened prybar when needed. I am not a snob when it comes to a good carry pocket knife, but that was a big let down for me. For a couple years I carried a CRKT M-16 (AUS-8, proved not durable for me) and still love the flipper design. Currently I rotate between BM axis pardue (154CM @ $50), Emerson CQCm-7 (154CM @ $90), and Al Mar SERE 2000 (VG10 @ $145) depending on the size/weight I am looking for. None of those have let me down yet. I think good steel is underated by many people when buying an EDC.
 
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