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I have the same question for the Ultra CDP...thanks.

Also where to find the single side safety to convert from abmi to right handed only
 

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I bought one from WilsonCombat.com

HOWEVER

Do not put it on - mine is sitting in my parts bin now.

Yeah, it feels cool flicking the slide down with your firing grip thumb. Problem is, the gun no longer fits properly in a holster, it binds on said holster, and that slide release is now within reach while you're shooting. Is this a defense gun? You'll see how easy it is to trip that thing by accident, causing premature slide lock back while you're in the middle of a magazine.

Slide release and mag release, are two things you do NOT need to get to in a hurry, certainly while you're shooting.



[This message has been edited by Battler (edited 11-25-2001).]
 

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This always begs the question of why???

1911s and for that matter all semi-automatic pistols do not have slide releases;;;it is a slide stop. The purpose is to aid in locking the slide to the rear not releasing it when locked to the rear.

Slingshot or hand over slide grip to release the slide is the proper technique on a semi-automatic pistol. That allows for full function of the slide travel and compression of the recoil spring.
 

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Randy - WHY?

This is one of those things that sounds good on paper, but in the real world (defense, matches, plinking) it is a serious drawback. There is a great tendency for the extended slide stops to flip upward on recoil, due to their greater mass and length/leverage. A slide stop engaging when you don't want it to makes for a very frustrating range session, and for "social encounters" use could induce stoppages when you really don't need them.
I've seen it in real life and later tried to talk a friend of one. When the predicted problems materialized, he saw the light and dropped the stock part back in.

DON'T DO IT! It's faster to, 1-not shoot the weapon dry, 2-use the left thumb to drop the slide to chamber a new round from a fresh mag, 3-use the weak hand to grasp the rear of the slide and slingshot it to chamber a new round from a fresh mag and/or to clear a stoppage.

#3 is the preferred method, for it solves more than one problem with one simple movement that is easy to perform under stress

SF
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for all your advise. I have to admit that I have been shoting all my life but this is my first 1911 type pistol.I am use to releasing the slide, forward with my right thumb. On the kimber I can not reach it ( small hands ). I will leave it stock after reading these post. Once again thanks for the info.
 

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You want a horror story.

I keep hearing about how great Kahr compact pistols are.

A friend of mine bought the ultre-elite-optioned-up 40 model.

That little thing kicks. . . fine. But when gripping it, it was all we could do to not drop the mag, and we were often locking the slide back.

Yeah, someone mentioned a cure of putting a stronger mag release spring, and changing the grip. Thing is, my grip is fine, taught by a lot of training. Yeah, I could change my grip on the gun; but to what? And could that hokey magrelease-avoiding grip be maintained under stress while firing this hard-kicking gun quickly?

It wouldn't bother me if the slide release (or slide stop control that lets me release) and mag release were even harder to get to, even at the expense of speed. If one needs an extra magazine, one sure as **** needs the one currently loaded to fire without malfunction.
 

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More gas for the fire, here.

Regarding the slingshot vs slide stop discussion, I ran across this in my Glock 19's manual:
"...either push the slide stop lever downwards, or pull the slide slightly backwards and allow it to spring forwards."

From the manual that came with my Eclipse (although this is referring to an empty chamber so YMMV):
"Release slide...by pulling slide fully rearward and releasing or by manually rotating the slide stop downward..." It then cautions against repeatedly slamming the slide shut on an empty chamber.

Not that I'm advocating one method over the other; just thought it was interesting that the manuals described both.

------------------
Studies show that people will miss 100% of the shots they do not attempt.
 

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Originally posted by abnranger:
This always begs the question of why???

1911s and for that matter all semi-automatic pistols do not have slide releases;;;it is a slide stop. The purpose is to aid in locking the slide to the rear not releasing it when locked to the rear.

Slingshot or hand over slide grip to release the slide is the proper technique on a semi-automatic pistol. That allows for full function of the slide travel and compression of the recoil spring.

Thank You! I went round with Shane on this one. It is very pleasant to see that some people out there are teaching good tactical habits. Keep it up.
 

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Just my .02 worth... and maybe more fuel to the fire

The slingshot method is good. Releasing the slide stop with the left thumb is good. Maybe even faster. This is not a matter of good tactics. I know this because I train for real. Forget what gun rags and "experts" say. Ask Larry Vickers, who has actually seen the elephant, if it is acceptable to release the slide stop with the thumb to chamber a fresh round at slide lock. Each individual has to find what works for them. And them only. I have learned both methods in the Marine Corps and LE Academy.

If "seeing the elephant" confuses anyone or if you don't know who Larry Vickers is, find out.

good shootin', gunny
 

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Go round and round all you want, the pistol is designed to be loaded by releasing the slide stop...I could not care less how you do it...but be careful what you "teach" others over the internet. There's nothing wrong with providing the information,but sooner or later, someone's gonna' get tagged for it. With all the information tied together these days, it's gonna' be sooner than you think...There are more and more attorneys born everyday and they have to get clients somewhere...If you think you aren't tied to the address in your computer, think again...just a little ditty......do what you want...

 

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I've been loading and recharging my 1911s using the slide stop since I handled my first one and I suspect that was well before most of you were born. This technique seems to work fairly well for me irrespective of all the new "experts" advising against it.

P.S.- Extended slide stops should never, in my opinion, be used on a carry weapon.
 

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randy fofar said:
Thanks for all your advise. I have to admit that I have been shoting all my life but this is my first 1911 type pistol.I am use to releasing the slide, forward with my right thumb. On the kimber I can not reach it ( small hands ). I will leave it stock after reading these post. Once again thanks for the info.
Don't let all these guys get you down .. just think out of the 100 of thousands of 1911s out there these guys represent about .5% ..

I've got a Wilson Combat Extended Slide Stop on my Custom II .. it works fine and haven't had any problems with it ..


 

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I have to agree with NightWolfe, I have a Wilson, or a King's extended slide release each of my Kimbers, and have never any trouble with them. Have used them quite a bit in IDPA matches, and have qrown quite used to them. Just bought a Wilson CQB, and it does not have the extended slide release, and I miss it. I will put one on the CQB as soon as I can.
 

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Another opinion

If you train to use the slide stop to release the slide, then that is most likely what you will do when the proverbial &[email protected]# hits the fan. Unfortunately you lose fine motor skill when the adrenaline starts pumping and you may not be able to find the slide stop with your thumb.
Reaching across the top of the slide with your off-hand, grasping the slide with your thumb and all fingers, pulling it to the rear and releasing it is less of a fine motor movenement. This same movement is also useful when clearing a "stovepipe".
Do what you are more comfortable with, but do it a lot. It has been said that 5000 repetitions are needed before you will develop "muscle memory". Should you ever need it, the time spent aquiring it will be a very wise investment.
 
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