1911Forum banner

41 - 60 of 93 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Regarding the above question as to where to buy springs... I suggest someplace other than the Dan Wesson website. I called in and ordered two recoil springs. The shipping and handling was $9.00... for two springs! Additionally, they were sent via FedEx and required a signature.

From now on, I'll probably go with Midway. At least there I can combine the shipping with other items.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
282 Posts
Recommended springs for an ECO?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I, too, would like to see the recommended recoil springs for ECO's in .45 ACP and 9mm. The ratings for somewhat similar Kimber and Colts seem to vary all over the place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
I would also like to see an official ruling on the ECO 9mm. Seems kind of loose and sloppy to me, but it's my first 9mm 1911 so I didn't know what to expect.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,496 Posts
Detail stripped my brand new Specialist today. Empty case dated 2-24-14. I measured and compared the recoil spring to the several I have here, and it was a dead ringer for an ISMI 16# spring...blue colored wire .0425" diameter

The sticky it mentions that all DW 5" guns come with an 18.5# Wolff recoil spring?

I also have Wolff 18.5# springs here to compare. Wolff springs have a brownish hue and the 18.5# wire measures .045"

Dare I say that this is indeed a 16# recoil spring?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
373 Posts
.38 super

I noticed that there was no mention of the spring weight for the .38 super in government and commander. Any comments or info?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I just bought a brand new DW Valor and so far am very pleased. I've read here and confirmed with DW that it comes with a Wolff 18.5 lb recoil spring. For many years I have been using various Wilson Combat CQBs' which I always equip with Wilson 17 lb recoil springs. Here's the problem, the Wolff 18.5 is not nearly as heavy as the Wilson 17lb spring. While they are the same length it is plainly visible to the eye that the Wilson is a thicker spring. Anyone else notice this? Who do I believe? A bit confused here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,776 Posts
Since this was not addressed, I am bumping it up.

I also need to know what the spring weight is on a CCO?

Going by Keith's original post and by Dave Severn's response to post #18, the recoils spring should be 20lbs and the main spring should be 23lbs.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
134 Posts
I noticed that guide rod head on my CCO looked like it was getting hit pretty hard just after 70 rounds of standard pressure factory rounds. The spent brass was also getting tossed pretty far. I ordered an 18, 20 and 22 lb Wolff spring to try out and noticed that they were much stronger than the stock spring. With a Secure Firearms spring tester, the stock spring measured 6 lbs weaker than the 18 lb Wolff. (Each of the Wolff springs were exactly 2 lbs apart.) Test fired the pistol with the 18 lb Wolff without issue. The brass was getting tossed about 8-10 feet. I marked the slide/plug with a sharpie and it was still making contact with the guide rod head so its definitely not short stroking. The pistol isn't going to get a lot of rounds through it but its good to know that the frame isn't going to get battered too hard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I noticed that there was no mention of the spring weight for the .38 super in government and commander. Any comments or info?
If you are still looking, I would suspect you will need a Wolff 41910 10# for the Govt and a Wolff 42212 12# commander.

ON
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Effectively the recoil spring weight mainly determines with how much force the slide and barrel lock (and other actions). It seems logical that the recoil spring weight could possibly affect whether the pistol is shooting high or low? (especially a new pistol).
Is this what others are finding? I might pop a 16# in there and see if my groups move higher while I'm in the break in period.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,240 Posts
Didn't change recoil spring, but did put on regular size grips. Grouping mysteriously moved higher! I'm where I need to be with a POA=POI sight picture.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Mer,
Great description of the functioning of the 1911! I do not think you are "FOS" (it took me second to figure out what that meant).
Star4ever, Mer,
Here is a couple of tidbits of info about springs;
First, the materials available today to make springs versus 100 years ago when the 1911 was built is 1000 times better, my opinion! We should never have to worry about a spring taking set if made properly!
2nd, do not confuse spring weight (load) and spring rate (ungineering world calls it spring constant but we will stick with spring rate)!!!!
When we buy a spring for a 1911 it has a number attached to it, example; 19lb recoil spring, this is a “load “at a specific height. What this means is, at a specific height (one time I read it was 1.625"in a government model, not certain) when this spring is being depressed to that specific height it pushes back 19 foot lbs. of force. We commonly referred to that as the "load" of/on the spring. This load is determined from the length of the spring and the spring "rate."
Spring rate is, basically, the amount of energy, in foot pounds in the US, to depress the spring one inch.
Spring rate is determined from wire size, mean coil diameter of the spring, and number of active coils.
So, anytime you change any of the 3 ingredients that makes up spring rate, load will also change. For instance the guy that clips a spring is doing himself a huge disservice, number of active coils decreases thus rate goes up stresses go up and length of spring is shorter. Anytime you reduce amount of active material in a spring stress go up.
Star4ever asked relationship of wire size to load, here is what I was taught as a general rule of thumb, everything staying the same, a 1% change in wire size = a 4% change in spring “rate,” not weight!
Also, everything being the same, a 1% change in mean coil diameter equals a 3% change in spring “rate” not weight!
These 2 little formulas were tools for us spring coilers that we lived by when making springs.
Lastly, if a recoil spring (for the sake of argument) standing erect in a scale measures in height 6.625” (and scale reads zero pounds), is depressed to 1.625” with a subsequent reading on the scale of 20 LBs. indicates the spring has traveled 5 inches, has a load (weight) of 20 lbs and a rate of 4lbs. (load/deflection equals formula to determine the actual spring rate).
Hope this helps and answers a few questions, just my 3 cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
re springs -- most buy from Wolff {incl. Wilson. and other mfgrs.}

the sole exception of which I am aware is the I.S.M.1. springs

I have used the spring weights recommended on several brands of 1911's to good effect for almost 20 years. A 20 lb. main spring has worked well in all gov't models over that period, I add a titanium cap and sometimes a titanium hammer strut for a tiny bit quicker lock time......I could be fooling myself, but both the heavy weight {see below} and light weight components when added, + a 3.5 lb. trigger pull do seem to improve my shooting.

Consistently running +P+ in 9 mm will require a stronger recoil spring.

Also, the spring weights rec. for the 10 mm {5 in. bbl.} work for most loads and ammo, however, a full load in a 10 mm, within its pressure limit will beat the snot out of a 1911, and toss empties into the next zip code ....... I ran 22's for a while, and settled on 24 lbs. [from Wolff} as a std. for my 10 {a full sized Delta Elite} ...... I also use a tungsten guide rod {from E.G.W.} and tungsten guide rod plug {from Cominoli via Brownells} in my 10 mm, the added weight helps with muzzle rise and overall recoil.

Don

/.
 
41 - 60 of 93 Posts
Top