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Discussion Starter #1
I've been having problems with my new Springfield Mil Spec. After having a trigger Job done with an Ed Brown Trigger, Sear, and installing a commander hammer, I have been having problems with the hammer fully cocking. It chambers the round fine but hammer does not fully cock. I recently put in an aftermarket recoil spring 18#. However it failed before this as well, with the factory springs. I would say it fails about 3-4 times out of 50. I'm shooting quality factory ammo also. Should I use a lighter recoil spring? What would the factory spring be rated at? What would cause this? Thanks for the help in advance.


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To clarify, is your hammer cocking and then "following", as its called, when the slide slams forward?
Or is it a matter of you are able to say, thumb cock the hammer, but racking the slide doesn't cock it?
If it were the latter, I doubt you'd be attempting to fire the gun at all, so I'll assume it's a hammer follow.
There are a couple of immediate possibilities: One, the left leaf of the sear spring is not exerting enough pressure on the sear. Or the trigger is too heavy (as in the part itself has too much mass, not pull weight) and inertia will cause it to reset then jar the sear off as the slide slams back and forth in cycling. Or the trigger job was simply poor and the hammer hooks are cut too short or at angle less than 90 degrees.

Edit: It just dawned on me that you mentioned a Commander hammer but nothing about the grip safety; a mil-spec grip safety can't be used with a Commander hammer, you know. Why? Cuz it'll mechanically interfere with the hammer.
 

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Sounds like you need to return your pistol to the gunsmith to correct the problem. This sounds like a classic "hammer follow" problem. The sear and hammer are likely not mated, the sear is slipping off the full cock hammer shelf. The recoil spring is not the problem. This is a dangerous condition, the pistol can go full auto with a full magazine. May also be that the trigger is too long (for your pistol) and is bumping the middle leg of the sear spring, causing the tension to reduce enough to release the sear (that would be less likely since you said it is an Ed Brown trigger and they already have a relief cut at the bottom to prevent contact with the sear spring).

In any case, your gunsmith needs to correct the situation. It is not safe as it is. Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the help. Yes I did mean that it was "following". I do have a drop in beavertail. I'm taking the gun to a differant smith to have the slide cut for Novak sights. I think I'll have him take a look at it instead of the previous smith. I wasn't super happy with the quality of the trigger job performed, and I'm not sure I want him to work on my pistol again. Even to remedy the problem. Or should I give him the benefit of the doubt and see what he can do?
 

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Some people say you should take it back and give a 'smith a chance to make it right. Others say if they mess it up, get it to someone who won't.

I can't say as I fall into either camp; it largely depends on if you trust the individual, and what's mor eimportant to you: getting your money or it's worth out of a particular individual or getting your gun made right and trustworthy. If you believe you can get BOTH out of the original 'smith, then by all means, let him have another go at it, but if not, go elsewhere.
 

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My guess is you can manually cock the hammer, right? If so the sear is just to long (the EB sear sure is long). Drop in your stock sear and have a go.
 
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