1911Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So my SW1911, always a flawless performer and one I always pointed to during discussions as being an example of a 1911 that can be relied upon and doesn't have the usual associative 1911 problems, is really staring to choke on me -- about five or or six times out of 50/75 rounds.

It's not having extraction problems, the casing get ejected and extracted just fine -- however, the new round gets hung up on the ramp and doesn't feed fully into the chamber. What's your diagnosis thoughts? New recoil spring or...? Bad mag? What's the Top 3 things to check in a situation of this sort?

Without heading upstairs to check my sheet, it's somewhere between 1500 and 2000 rounds (isn't that early for a recoil spring change?...the spring, incidentally, looks fine), and the ammo is Blazer Brass, the ammo that I've always fed it (so no changes there). The gun is cleaned between each range trip, so no buildup.

Odd that it would perform so beautifully for so long, then start choking so chronically all of a sudden...

Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
651 Posts
Same ammo or has there been a change? I'm leaning towards the mags, Get a new recoild spring and compare it to the one in the gun, if the one in the gun is shorter change it. JIMHO
Chief-7700
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
I suggest you pull the extractor, and clean both it and the extractor channel thoroughly.

I use a .22 brush and patchs to clean the channel.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,498 Posts
Jammer Six said:
I suggest you pull the extractor, and clean both it and the extractor channel thoroughly.

I use a .22 brush and patchs to clean the channel.

Good luck!
S&W's have an external extractor. ;)


Sounds a lot like a recoil spring if it just started suddenly. I'd give it a good detail strip, inspection and cleaning just for good measure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Check you ammo and see if you have a batch with weak crimp. I know I have observed Blazer Brass ammo tend to have a weak crimp that will allow the bullet to get pushed back further into the brass. This will shorten the round and expose the brass month and allow it to get hung up more than usual.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
It wouldn't be an extractor problem, though, if the old cases are being extracted, would it? The old casing are pulled out just fine...it's the new cartridge heading into the empty chamber that's the problem.

Nope, same ammo it's always had -- Blazer Brass. I checked the box because I've had some setback problems myself with that stuff, but it all looked fine.

So if I set those aside...is the recoil spring the likely culprit? Anything else I should check (mags, I know...I didn't watch to see if there was any pattern w/ the mags I was using...I'll be sure to do that next time)?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
58 Posts
Keep in mind that the extractor is also involved in the feed cycle in that the rim must slide under the extractor hook. If there is too much extractor tension or the hook is rough, the rear of the round will get hung up in a low position and stops the feed cycle. Any chance of providing a picture so we can see what you are dealing with?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
872 Posts
I would try a different mag first. Then look into the feed ramp, might need to be polished up. Then I would consider a new recoil spring. Cases should land around 6 feet from you, if not it's a spring issue.

After this the extractor will get my attention.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,484 Posts
NOt to be overly technical but the extractor is not "involved" in the feed cycle, it's totally unnecessary to feeding. BUT it can interfere with feeding if it's full of crud, etc. :cool:

Remove the extractor and cycle the action with a full magazine. If cartridges feed the extractor is interfereing somehow.

Since the extractor is out clean it and the channel well and replace. Does it feed now?

(Recommend you do all this with dummy cartridges or outdoors! ;) )

-- Chuck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thanks, folks -- I'm cleaning it this evening, so I'll take a close look at that extractor (guess it never really occured to me that it could interfer, but now it does make sense)...I did a quick visual check of it at the range, when I was giving everything a quick lookover, and it looked okay (clean, didn't appear chipped), but I'll give it a close examination tonight. I'm not proficient enough to remove the extractor, but I'm familiar with the tension it normally has, and I'll give the cleaning around it's nooks and crannies extra TLC. Will look the recoil spring over well, and will compare it to my other 1911s, see if it appears different. I'll check the feedramp, see if an odd gouge somehow found its way on it, and so on...

I'll head off the range next week (and will label and watch my mags this time), and report back. Thanks for the advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Finally got to the range. With a new recoil spring (and my usual fastidious cleaning beforehand, with special attention to the extractor (though it looked fine)), I only had one FTF (F To Feed) in 125 rounds. Still unusual for this formerly flawless-running 1911, but a heckuva lot better than the last couple visits where it was running at about a 10% failure rate.

The new recoil spring was .5" to .75" (will measure tonight when I clean) longer than the old stock one, so clearly a new spring was called for. I checked my records and it was 2300 rounds, a bit more than I'd previously thought.

Hopefully that one FTF was an anomoly that won't be seen again anytime soon...if not, it'll be on it's way to S&W. I've done what I can.

Thanks again for all the earlier feedback.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,866 Posts
at-home-daddy said:
...The new recoil spring was .5" to .75" (will measure tonight when I clean) longer than the old stock one, so clearly a new spring was called for. I checked my records and it was 2300 rounds, a bit more than I'd previously thought...
Don't get lulled into a false sense of security by thinking you can clearly identify when a spring needs to be replaced simply by comparing its length to a new spring. It is not uncommon for a new spring to "take a set" shortly after being installed, but still be servicable for many thousands of cycles.

I don't know if you're cleaning your mags at all, but when mine get dirty, the followers sometimes hang, or get "slow", and can cause the next round to not come up all the way, or come up too slowly, to feed correctly. Might be something for you to check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
736 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
kevins_garage said:
I don't know if you're cleaning your mags at all, but when mine get dirty, the followers sometimes hang, or get "slow", and can cause the next round to not come up all the way, or come up too slowly, to feed correctly. Might be something for you to check.
Good point; I probably haven't cleaned them for four- or five-hundred rounds...I'll do that this evening along with the gun. Thanks for the reminder.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top