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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know, I should have had one all along, but I came into some extra cash today and decided it was time to buy a chrono. I had been researching them for a while to see what the consensus was about which chrono to go with, and I decided to buy the CED Millennium 2.

Anyone here using this chrono? Any nuances that I should be aware of or usage tips you can provide?

Thanks in advance.

Mike
 

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I'm still using my 25 year old Oehler so can't comment on brand - But, you will really appreciate that chron.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I read a lot of good things about Oehler, basically that they are the gold standard and about as expensive as gold too...:biglaugh:

The CED was recommended in lieu of the Oehler, it appears they are no longer manufacturing new chrono's. I am hoping the chrono helps me dial in an accurate and consistent 9mm load, my results have been less than stellar to date.
 

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Hi Mike,

Don't know much about the particular chrono you purchased, but I've never heard anything bad about them. I've been using a Chrony Beta Master for several years and am satisfied with it.

When you get around to making & chrono'ing some 9mm loads, post your results here. We're all interested in "real world" results. :)
 

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Chrono tips

I am by no means an expert, but these seemed to work for me:

Stay in the shade. Direct light does some crazy things to mine. Cloudy days are good for chronographing.

Stay consistent. Set the chrono up at the same distance each time. Bring a tape measure or a piece of string cut to a specific length. I use 10 feet.

Bring extra batteries. Dragging a chrono, tripod, etc to the range, only to find out that you left the thing on the last time you used it is no fun.

Don't shoot it. Use a stand or bag to steady your shot. I gather my velocity data by shooting into the berm. Test for accuracy separately.

If someone else wants to use it, either do it for them (also a good way to try new guns) or make sure they are good for the price of the chono.

Keep good notes. Back up your notes, I misplaced my note book with alot of information in it.

Don't be surprised when you get very different velocities than those listed in your manuals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi Mike,

Don't know much about the particular chrono you purchased, but I've never heard anything bad about them. I've been using a Chrony Beta Master for several years and am satisfied with it.

When you get around to making & chrono'ing some 9mm loads, post your results here. We're all interested in "real world" results. :)
Thanks Rod, I'll be sure to post up my findings. I think I'll bring out a few different flavors of 9mm loads - different powders and different charge weights. My current loads seem to 'pattern' more than they 'group' and I really want to get to the bottom of that issue.

I am by no means an expert, but these seemed to work for me:

Stay in the shade. Direct light does some crazy things to mine. Cloudy days are good for chronographing.

Stay consistent. Set the chrono up at the same distance each time. Bring a tape measure or a piece of string cut to a specific length. I use 10 feet.

Bring extra batteries. Dragging a chrono, tripod, etc to the range, only to find out that you left the thing on the last time you used it is no fun.

Don't shoot it. Use a stand or bag to steady your shot. I gather my velocity data by shooting into the berm. Test for accuracy separately.

If someone else wants to use it, either do it for them (also a good way to try new guns) or make sure they are good for the price of the chono.

Keep good notes. Back up your notes, I misplaced my note book with alot of information in it.

Don't be surprised when you get very different velocities than those listed in your manuals.
Thanks for the general tips, especially about setting the chrono up at the same distance each time, I hadn't thought about that. Spare batteries are also a good idea, I had that happen a few times with one of my rifle sights - was not much fun to get to the range and then find the batteries were dead.

I'm going to do my best not to shoot it, but if I do I just want to say now that it's the guns fault, not mine! :biglaugh:
 

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I have a CED Millennium 2 and have been pleased with it. I've shot everything from BB guns and arrows to center fire pistols and rifles.
 

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I use my chrono for pistols and revolvers only, as I do not hand load for rifle rounds.

Be careful if you shoot a scoped revolver through your chrono, you might put one of its eyes out. Not to worry too much, the nice folks at the chrono factory will sell you a new eye. Don't ask me how I know this.

Post a target down range and shoot into the target so that you will have a consistent point of aim and trajectory over the screens.

Someone shooting a belch-fire-belted magnum something or other in the lane next to yours at the range may trigger your chronograph and give you some strange results.

If you maintain a logbook or note book for reloading, take it with you to the range so you can record your results and observations.

If your screens are separate from the central unit, make sure the tripod you use to support the screens is sturdy and has a lot of available adjustment range.

Screens sometimes act like sails if it's windy. You may need a sand bag or two on the diagonal braces of the tripod in this case.
 

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I read a lot of good things about Oehler, basically that they are the gold standard and about as expensive as gold too...:biglaugh:

The CED was recommended in lieu of the Oehler, it appears they are no longer manufacturing new chrono's. I am hoping the chrono helps me dial in an accurate and consistent 9mm load, my results have been less than stellar to date.
I own and Oehler and was shocked when found out a few months ago they stopped making them
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Stay in the shade. Direct light does some crazy things to mine. Cloudy days are good for chronographing.
Hrmm, hopefully this isn't an issue for me, cloudy days are a bit of a rarity here in souther AZ. We maybe get 15 of them a year...:biglaugh:

The outdoor range that I usually go to has a covered firing line which does cast a shadow forward of the firing line during early parts of the day. If I have an issue with direct light, I'll have to try setting up the chrono early to stay in the shade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Post a target down range and shoot into the target so that you will have a consistent point of aim and trajectory over the screens.

If your screens are separate from the central unit, make sure the tripod you use to support the screens is sturdy and has a lot of available adjustment range.

Screens sometimes act like sails if it's windy. You may need a sand bag or two on the diagonal braces of the tripod in this case.
Doc, so you can fire the rounds over the screens? I had assumed the shots had to travel through the 'hoops' that the screens form?

I did opt to buy a seperate, heavy-duty tripod after reading several comments echoing your own about wind and muzzle blast effect. Most people were very unhappy with the one CED sells, and even CED states it is appropriate only for handgun and rimfire calibers. I went with a full-size tripod that can accept a counterweight to keep it secure. I figure it was worth the extra money since I don't want to have to buy another and it can do double duty as a spotting scope host when needed. Here is the one I bought: http://www.opticsplanet.net/yukon-landmark-full-size-heavy-duty-tripod-lm19003.html
 

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'Over the screens'... poor choice of words on my part. You are correct. The round does go 'through the hoops'. I like to aim just above the sensors, and that's what I meant by 'over the screens'.

You will thank yourself for buying a good tripod.
 
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