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I was at an Armed Women of America class - I was told to make a triangle, close one eye, then the other and say when the object shifted. I did that and was told I was left eye dominant. For some reason, I can’t close my right eye very easily, but I can close my left eye - I think I’m just confused, arrrgh
From the NRA Pistol Safety book (getting ready to take a class), they recommend looking at an object 10-12 feet away, through the triangle then slowly bring your hands back to your face, keeping the object within view. The eye that your hands end up in front of is your dominant eye. My two cents. Also, they have some good information on aiming and stuff like that in the course. Good luck!
 

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A simple test to determine whether or not the barrel or ammo are at fault for this condition is known as the plunk test.
  1. Remove the barrel

  2. Hold it vertically with the chamber up and muzzle down

  3. Drop a live round into the chamber. You should hear a distinctive sound when the brass case mouth strikes the steel chamber ledge.

  4. Then while pushing the chambered round forward hard against the chamber ledge, rotate it.

    It should turn easily and it should easily drop out of the barrel when you upend it. If it does not, either the cartridge is too big for the chamber, the chamber is too small for the cartridge, the barrel leade is too short, the case has inadequate crimp, or a couple of other less common possibilities.
You should run as many rounds through this test as you have time for because there may only be one round in the box that is the culprit.

/QUOTE]

M60 - Please Delete My Post - Thank You
 

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I am left eye dominate and right-handed. That's never been a huge issue for me when shooting pistols, scoped rifles are a whole different story. I had my eye doctor grind me a set of bi-focal glasses with the grind on both the bottom of the lens (the normal position) and a second grind at the top of the lens. I often do work above my head, and this really helped. It also allows me to wear them while shooting handguns. I can focus on the front sight (which is clear) and the target is slightly out of focus but visible down range.

Grumpy
 

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In addition to the advice and description in post #21 about testing for cross-eye dominance, the follow-on advice is to shift your stance so that you're using the dominant eye to sight the pistol. That is, if you shoot right-handed, you'll shift your upper body and arms to bring the handgun up in front of your left eye (while still using a right-handed grip). Sight alignment and sight placement procedures remain the same, only with using the left eye.

Again, the general advice is to shoot with both eyes open, so the ability to close or squint one eye of the other shouldn't be an issue (as long as you're bringing the handgun and sights into alignment with the dominant eye).

However, if this is difficult (especially in the beginning if you've been using the non-dominant eye for a long time), consider putting a piece of frosted (Scotch) tape over the lens of the non-dominant eye on your shooting glasses. This will force you to use the dominant eye for sight alignment and mitigate the tendency to "cheat" with the other eye.

Finally, if none of these suggestions help, talk to your optometrist. Cross-dominance is not particularly uncommon (as many as 20% of my students discover they're cross-dominant when we do the test - as described in post #21). However, there are a very small percentage of people who are essentially "ambidextrous" with their eyesight with neither eye actually dominant. Those folks have usually learned over the years to use one eye or the other for this or that particular task, and when confronted by the "schoolbook" solution for formal training in one of those tasks that suggests that they use the "correct" eye to perform it, have a great deal of difficulty forcing their natural learned performance into the "correct" model. Your optometrist can help you determine if you fall into this small group.

I'd also suggest that if recoil control is another difficulty for you, then seek improvement in your grip technique.

In the end, though, there's little to argue against success, so if you have been shooting a long time and have a technique (stance or grip) that works for you (even though it's perhaps not the "schoolbook" technique), then that's what works for you. On the other hand, if you can't advance your skills using that "natural" technique, then turning to the "schoolbook" for incremental changes might be warranted.

I may have missed it in one of your other threads or an earlier post in this one, but my final bit of advice would be to seek out and get some good instruction. Not all instructors are the same, and even an instructor that can work with one student may not be the best with a different student. You might have to book an hour or so with several different instructors to find the one who can work best with you. An instructor who has built his / her rep with competition or tactical training might be a subject matter expert in those levels of training, but he or she might not have the patience or attitude to work with a novice or beginner. Don't feel bad if you have to switch instructors before you find the right one for you. Remember, you're the one paying the tuition, so it's all about what YOU are getting out of the relationship and not what the instructor is getting.
 

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I made a little video for you when I was at the range today. It actually is a bit longer than I planned for because I was testing a new mag catch button on my competition gun. Of course, the damn thing is tool long and engaged it with my support hand mid-string, dropping the mag. In a retrospect, though, it may have been helpful because it showed that I indexed the gun on target twice.
The setup is similar to yours, 7 yards, silhouette target, and a 1911. Mine is .45. The difference is that I taped my front sight the best I could. I even went looking for a black tape so there was no contrast patch upfront that I could use.


Your result that you posted above doesn't have anything to do with cross-dominance. You should be able to center punch that target at that distance without sights. Even if you can't center punch it, you should be able to hold the group somewhere on the target. Your result is diagnostic of severe anticipation, flinching and subconscious fear of gun going off. 1911 trigger is a king of anticipation induction. You've received a terrible advice elsewhere on the site encouraging you to try .45. Of course the 45 is not going to fly out of your hands or break your hand bones but it will induce those tension responses even more. My sincere recommendation is to put down the 1911 for a bit, put away the PX4cc (it is a stupendous carry gun, I owned two, you're just not quite ready for it), make sure your B92 fits your hands well, get a 22LR conversion for it and work with it until everything lands within 2 inches of target's center.

In regards to eye cross-dominance:
  • never close your dominant eye; instead turn your head so you're aiming with it
  • that early in shooter's development a lot of great instructors recommend learning to shoot left handed.

Best of luck to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I made a little video for you when I was at the range today. It actually is a bit longer than I planned for because I was testing a new mag catch button on my competition gun. Of course, the damn thing is tool long and engaged it with my support hand mid-string, dropping the mag. In a retrospect, though, it may have been helpful because it showed that I indexed the gun on target twice.
The setup is similar to yours, 7 yards, silhouette target, and a 1911. Mine is .45. The difference is that I taped my front sight the best I could. I even went looking for a black tape so there was no contrast patch upfront that I could use.


Your result that you posted above doesn't have anything to do with cross-dominance. You should be able to center punch that target at that distance without sights. Even if you can't center punch it, you should be able to hold the group somewhere on the target. Your result is diagnostic of severe anticipation, flinching and subconscious fear of gun going off. 1911 trigger is a king of anticipation induction. You've received a terrible advice elsewhere on the site encouraging you to try .45. Of course the 45 is not going to fly out of your hands or break your hand bones but it will induce those tension responses even more. My sincere recommendation is to put down the 1911 for a bit, put away the PX4cc (it is a stupendous carry gun, I owned two, you're just not quite ready for it), make sure your B92 fits your hands well, get a 22LR conversion for it and work with it until everything lands within 2 inches of target's center.

In regards to eye cross-dominance:
  • never close your dominant eye; instead turn your head so you're aiming with it
  • that early in shooter's development a lot of great instructors recommend learning to shoot left handed.

Best of luck to you.
Thank you so much for the video; I appreciate it!
Yes, I came to the same conclusion regarding the PX4, that I was getting frustrated with it - so it’s currently tucked away in my gun safe

I’m seriously considering looking for a .22 1911-type; I like the 1911 feel in my hands, and I think being able to place shots in tighter groups will help

Take care!
 

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I’m seriously considering looking for a .22 1911-type; I like the 1911 feel in my hands . . .
For what it's worth, when I teach a new shooter I always start them off with a Ruger 22/45.

Then there are the cool looking Lite versions that might be more appealing to you.

These Rugers have grips that mimic the size and angle of the 1911 which helps when a new shooter transitions from the .22 to the 1911.

- - -

Last month I had a female shooter of small stature who had been introduced to shooting years ago by some moron who put a .45 1911 in her hands and with no guidance told her to point and pull the trigger. It was an extremely unpleasant experience for her and she was clearly intimidated by the noise and recoil. I worked with her one-on-one every day for a week during which she progressed from the Ruger 22/45 to a Colt Government .380 to a 9mm 1911 to a .45 1911. The only factory ammo was .22. All other calibers were my medium strength handloads. She did very well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 · (Edited)
I’m taking poster YVK’s advice; all the 9mm’s are in the gun safe, and I have an ATI GSG 1911 .22 coming - as I’m using it for training and plinking, I didn’t want to spend a lot, and I’ve read many positive things about this firearm - it’s not a custom 1911 - but it doesn’t have to be

Another positive is that as it’s a .22, it will need to be cleaned and lubricated early and often - and doing that will continue to get me familiar with basic 1911 maintenance. I did get high velocity .22lr (1250fps); the Aguila .22 I have on-hand works fine in my 10/22; from what I’ve read, it might be an issue in the GSG

I hope to find some good instruction in my area (Ogden, Utah)

I’m going to focus on shooting fundamentals: trigger control, sight, breathing, flinching and anticipation control until I can get good groups with the .22, then work the 9mm.

I’m setting a future reward of getting an upgraded 1911, but I have a lot to work on first

Thanks, YVK and all!
 

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First, don't worry about breathing unless your goal is bullseye. You're not going to hold your breath when you shoot for the score, whatever that means for you.

I hope to find some good instruction in my area (Ogden, Utah)
If you trusted me on the first part, I'll try to milk it :). There are very strong competition shooters in SLC/Ogden area but nobody good that I know of teaches [don't ask me how I know, I just do :)]. Check the steel challenge matches, I think they have them at the Lee-Kay. It is fun and decent practice. However, the TPC in St George has by far the best fundamentals instruction program that exists. Again, I just know :). Sign up for their Handgun Mastery class. I would try to call first and find out who is going to instruct. They have a large cadre that they use and sometimes they don't know who will be doing what and when. If there is an option to take a class instructed by the Williams girls and/or Glen Wong, or Brian Nelson, that would be good. If not, it still will be good. That place is like a farm for champion shooters, and they do a great job with us mere mortals too.
 
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