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Hi there. I am hoping for some advice/opinions from those who know!

My husband bought a Rugger 40 and I refused to have it in the house unless I knew how to use it. So I took a class. I shot it for the first time and LOVED it! I wanted more! I took myself to the range and asked for some more help. The range master had me shoot a 9mm and I loved it even more. So, it is my husbands fault that I bought a Springfield 1911 Range Officer at the gun show in Reno last weekend.

I found a youtube video on field stripping and reassembly and watched it many times before attempting it myself. I did it, but had a little trouble getting it back together. I had to ask my husband for a little help, but we figured it out.

When looking for my gun, I found that I liked the ergonomic grips much better than any other. But the RO has such a beautiful walnut grip, my husband is giving me trouble about changing it out. Does it devalue the gun if I change the grips? It is not that it feels bad with the original grips, just better with the other.

Also, I am looking to get into some competitions shoots this summer as my excuse to do some more shooting! Any suggestions on how to practice (on range, off range, or anything else). Looking like a newbie is fine! I just don't want to look like an idiot.

Any advice, opinions, or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
Sandi
 

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LoL!
Generally guns do not de-value like that until there is non-reversible frame modification.

1911 grips are designed to be replaced as needed (some folks have many for just one gun).
Just replace them and keep them in a drawer, if you like to swap them in and out from time to time.
Springfield sell those grips for $40 (Cocobolo wood), and that is retail pricing.

Glad you already took a class...watch youtube for more tips, other that that, it's practice.

Some grip store to check out (I recommend G10 material):
https://vzgrips.com/gun-grips/1911 <-wait for a sale (usually 20-25 % off on holiday promos)
http://www.davidsonknives.com/ <-Larry is so easy to work with if you like it really customized.
http://ahrendsgripsusa.com/1911.htm
http://www.esmeralda.cc/1911_full_size.htm

congrats, but you forgot to post pics of your RO :dope:
 

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Changing grips and sights are normal procedures on new guns. If you are worried about re-sale value, hang on to the box it came in. You can store all the original parts you swap out in that box.

You will quickly discover that the 1911 is the Mr. Potato Head of the handgun world. Parts swapping happens at a dizzying pace. Any 1911 I have bought for carry immediately received combat night sights, a low profile extended slide release lever, and an arched mainspring housing, if not so equipped. That is to keep a consistent feel amongst my regular lineup. I would not replace any parts on my Great-Grandpa's gun, of course...
 

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Welcome to the club. You picked a nice 1911 to start with.

Shooting is very fun and is a useful, possibly life-saving skill to have.

The first thing is to really familiarize yourself with the basic rules of gun safety and to always be mindful of them.

Second, the best way to get better at shooting...is to keep shooting. Look for deals on ammo and get to the range as often as possible. Ammo is a better upgrade than nearly any after-market part you can put on a gun. I would advise putting a lot of bullets down range before getting into competitive shooting.

Youtube is a great resource for information and training on firearms. Just try to stay away from the idiots and wannabes.

Hickok45 is always a great resource for common sense no frills tips.

Here's three videos of his on basic shooting technique that will be invaluable to anyone starting out.

Part 1 Stance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A1Cf0WEeXZk

Part 2 Grip
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=22msLVCtPk8

Part 3 Trigger Control
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Xa5JPLGIsU
 

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I can't really give any better advice than ^^^^ these posts above. Unless you make a permanent change to a gun it generally will not devalue it. Everyone on this forum whom has been into guns, 1911's especially, for any length of time will have more than one set of grips.

Was this your husband's first gun? I ask because you said you weren't letting it in the house unless you were trained on it. Either way, whatever your opinion on guns was before, welcome to the shooting world and firearm ownership. It's an area that brings a truckload of personal responsibility but is a nice place to be. Good luck.
 

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Hi there. I am hoping for some advice/opinions from those who know!

My husband bought a Rugger 40 and I refused to have it in the house unless I knew how to use it. So I took a class. I shot it for the first time and LOVED it! I wanted more! I took myself to the range and asked for some more help. The range master had me shoot a 9mm and I loved it even more. So, it is my husbands fault that I bought a Springfield 1911 Range Officer at the gun show in Reno last weekend.

I found a youtube video on field stripping and reassembly and watched it many times before attempting it myself. I did it, but had a little trouble getting it back together. I had to ask my husband for a little help, but we figured it out.

When looking for my gun, I found that I liked the ergonomic grips much better than any other. But the RO has such a beautiful walnut grip, my husband is giving me trouble about changing it out. Does it devalue the gun if I change the grips? It is not that it feels bad with the original grips, just better with the other.

Keep the original grips and modify to your heart's content.

Also, I am looking to get into some competitions shoots this summer as my excuse to do some more shooting! Any suggestions on how to practice (on range, off range, or anything else). Looking like a newbie is fine! I just don't want to look like an idiot.

Check with your local gun club(s) for competitions like IDPA, USPSA, steel challenge, ICORE. International Defensive Pistol Association is probably the best way to get involved in competitive pistol shooting.

Dry (firing) practice is a good way to get acquainted with changing magazines or drawing/holstering a gun, among other things. If you're thinking about concealed carry, get some formalized training and seriously thing about joining USCCA. A little pricey to be a member, but they put out an excellent magazine with all kinds of helpful guidance relative to carrying a gun for personal defense.

Any advice, opinions, or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
Sandi
See above for included/embedded suggestions.
 

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Welcome to the wonderful world of shooting Sandi.

I love your attitude. Being open to learn is not as common as it should be in this sport. Here is how to keep from looking like or being an idiot:

1. Always handle every gun as though it were loded. Even if you just unloaded it.
2. Always keep the gun pointed in a safe direction. Don't cover anything with the muzzle you're not willing to destroy.
3. Always keep your finger off the trigger until pointed at the intended target.
4. Always be aware of your target and what's in line with it. It's not enough to know your target and what's beyond. You nees to ensure nobody can walk in between you and the target.

Follow these 4 rules and you'll never injure anyone and never look like an idiot.
 

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Be safe. Have fun. Forget about resale value and enjoy your gun as you see fit.
 

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Welcome Sandi ;)

Enjoy your 1911 anyway you want to... Maybe tactfully you could tell your husband that if you followed his logic then shooting it would devalue it also.

I like your idea about getting into match shooting to give you incentive to practice more.
 

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Welcome to the forum, and the wonderful world of firearms. Many above have stated facts that I will not repeat, but one that bears restating is practice. Shoot as much as you can (afford). As for new grips, look at them as new shoes. Swap to match your outfit or purse !!! :cool: I have waaaay more sets of grips than 1911s to put em on. Do a search on "1911 grips", and you will be amazed with what you find. Won't hurt resale value a bit. Also you need to post pics of your new gun for us to see. :)
 

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Welcome to the shooting sports, great attitude to be open to learning, and to be willing to take some training - these are key to being safe. You're starting with a good 1911. I won't repeat the advice you've already been given above, but I will say that if you are considering getting into competition shooting, then you are going to spend a prohibitive amount of money on ammo unless you are willing to learn reloading. It isn't difficult to do really, but just like gun handling it requires you to not be distracted when operating. You will probably find reloading to be a hobby-within-a-hobby like many of us already have, but it is a rewarding one. Again, welcome to the shooting sports.
 

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SandiH- WElcome to the wonderful world of firearms, and you picked the 1911 as so many millons before have. Don't worry about devalue your pistol, the grips don't change value and about 60% of all shooters change there grips, just keep them if you want to go back or sale it. As far as Class, I suggest you take an NRA basic pistol course (not just saying that because am instructor), it is informational and good. Far as getting ready to a competition, just go to the range and practice the fundamentals, most important. Don't worry about being new at a shoot, just let people know. The firearm community is truely one of the friendliest and nicest around. Believe it or not, it is better to let them know, they will take you by the hand and introduce you to everything and help you feel welcome and build (they will know anyway, wink).
 

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Welcome!
Everyone else has already said what needs to be said, so I will just remind you that safety always comes first, just slightly ahead of fun. And it sounds like the fun is just beginning. Enjoy your new hobby. Take your time, have lots of patience, get advice and constructive criticism, and know there's a great bunch of friendly and knowledgeable people on this forum willing to help, if you need it.
 

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Sandi, welcome to the forum and to shooting! You will find shooters to be, by and large, a welcoming and friendly group. Strongly held opinions, but welcoming and friendly. I wish I had had the resources you have available when I was learning to shoot (just the boy scout riflery course, and then my university pistol team), so I would suggest you take advantage of the variety of courses available, as several posters have already suggested. I haven't shot much competition since college, but there are a number of different shooting (looking for the right word) games? in which you can get involved.

Again, welcome, and please let us know your experiences as your progress!

Cheers,
Phil
 

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Hi Sandi welcome to the club.
 

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Hi and welcome, shoot often, train often, Small peices of training have a gnats life. Repeat training with different instructors,you'll be suprised at what you didn't catch,or what one trainer will stress,verses another. Reach out to others at range for different instructors . NRA has some wonderful programs for Women, taught by Women. regards k.
 

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SandiH- WElcome to the wonderful world of firearms, and you picked the 1911 as so many millons before have. Don't worry about devalue your pistol, the grips don't change value and about 60% of all shooters change there grips, just keep them if you want to go back or sale it. As far as Class, I suggest you take an NRA basic pistol course (not just saying that because am instructor), it is informational and good. Far as getting ready to a competition, just go to the range and practice the fundamentals, most important. Don't worry about being new at a shoot, just let people know. The firearm community is truely one of the friendliest and nicest around. Believe it or not, it is better to let them know, they will take you by the hand and introduce you to everything and help you feel welcome and build (they will know anyway, wink).
+1, attend a few local shoots,let people know your learning and I bet you get lots of help:)
 

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It is not that it feels bad with the original grips, just better with the other.
then put 'em on...it's YOUR pistol, no one else's

Also, I am looking to get into some competitions shoots this summer

Any suggestions on how to practice

! I just don't want to look like an idiot.
then don't do anything stupid (unsafe) :biglaugh:

as Todd mentioned, most local shoots are chock full of "good folks"
No one will make fun of you for fumbling mag changes or laugh at you for misses and/or slow times.

Go with the attitude to shoot for learning and fun first, not to "compete".
and I promise you'll enjoy it

how to "practice"?
have "purpose" to it..what i mean is, just don't hang a target and blast away at the middle of it.
You might start out with slow fire, focusing on trigger control and sight pic.
Then rapid doubles or multiple targets, or Bill Drills or Mozambique drills or a dozen other skill drills .

again, the idea is to have "purpose" to each practice session


..L.T.A.
 
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