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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just picked up my first war time 1911 on Friday and I have been trying to find out the answers to some questions about it. I had followed a thread on this board about the same type of questions and learned a lot. I am still wondering about a couple of things about my pistol though. The serial number on the frame is between 300,000-350,000. By all information that I could find that would make it a Colt frame made in 1918. However I thought that there should have been an Inspector General(?) mark over top of the mag release on the Colt's. There is a little picture of something with what looks to be SII stamped under it in very small letters. Is this correct? Also the pistol is a bit rough as there are some dings on the finish and some good wear on the finish. What should the finish look like, is it a matte like current Colt's or is it smoother? Mine looks like a dark grey and when I put it near a dark green handkerchief it almost has a tint of green(or maybe I'm going color blind!). Any insight to this would be appreciated. I got the piece for around $650 and I am pretty happy with the purchase, even if it is only good for a shooter. I would just like to know what I really have! Thanks.
 

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The little mark over the mag release is the inspector's. Early guns had the inspector's initials stamped, while later guns had an anonymous code. The symbol stamped along with the S11 is an upturned eagle head. The finish should be bluing over a fairly low-grade polish. My gun is in the 296,000 range, and the appearance is grainy. Reworked guns will often have been sandblasted, and the metal will have a uniform rough appearance. These reworks all also usually refinished in parkerizing, which can have a distinct green color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. The metal sure does not look sandblasted as it is smooth. It also appears to have a "grain" going from front to back, kind of like a wood grain, on the flat surfaces. As I look at the pistol and hold it up to a black cabinet, it looks more grey in color than anything. Maybe my eyes are getting nasty. How about the grips on this. I would expect that they are not original as they are full checkered hardwood. If anyone has any more insight on this or anything else, please let me know, I really appreciate the help.
 

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Wood lasts along time and the grips are'nt being heated with shooting. Stored during off time. Most old guns have original grips. They can easily outlast a poorly cleaned and stored weapon.
 

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Your gun's finish is probably original, the reason for the color is simply that the bluing dissolves over time. Rust sets in underneath too leaving a brown patina. As long as the gun is kept away from moisture it'll be fine. The grips are not original, but then again if they were and in good shape they'd be orth a significant persentage of the rest of the pistol. Original WW1 era grips are going for $100-$150 or more these days.
 

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Original grips why would'nt they be? Worth $150 or whatever who cares? Wood is a longer lasting material. Because it is a natural material. The firearm rusts on the steel because it is an alloy. Nobody knows everything, and if you think so your fooling yourself only. Why do you think everything is fake? The entire world is'nt a cybernet-sell the original grips-make a fake grip-reblue the gun-sell with story-checker the hammer like original world. It is'nt a profitable enough effort. I only say these things because of your doom and gloom old 1911 adages.
 

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Originally posted by Redzone:
Original grips why would'nt they be?
Because the poster said the grips on his pistol are made of hardwood. The original M1911 grips were American Walnut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks again guys. You are a wealth of knowledge! Ya' know, I have always loved the 1911. I learned to shoot on one when I was about 8 years old with my old man's piece. When I was of age to purchase my first handgun there was absolutely nothing else for me. This was during the age of hi-cap, doo-dad guns. I never even though about them. This pistol, as stated is my first GI model. I never though that my obsession with 1911 could have gotten bigger, but it has! I love 'em!

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Simian

NRA Life Member
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why are you so hostile? As stated this is my first GI model and I had hoped to learn a bit about it. Everything that I have owned in the past are commercial 1911's. I am sorry that I offended you by asking a question which obviously marked me as an "imposter"(?), but if guys that are new to specific things don't ask questions then how do they learn? I hope that everyone here isn't this nasty to people. Sorry to have offended.
 

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This is a forum where people come to share information and ideas. Talking down to other members is not allowed. If Simian needs information about his new Colt I want him to feel assured that he's come to the right place and not be intimidated.

With that in mind please keep any strong personal feelings off this forum.

[This message has been edited by dsk (edited 03-20-2001).]
 
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