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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an ejector on a Ruger SR1911 that has become loose. I noticed it when I did a detail strip for a thorough cleaning. When handling the stripped frame I heard a little rattly tink-a-tink sound and I thought it was strange seeing as how the frame was stripped bare. It turns out it was the ejector rattling around loose. I put some red loctite on it and secured it with a large strong rubber band overnight until it dried. The ejector stayed tight for the next two range sessions then became slight loose again but not as bad as before. I tried pushing out the ejector pin to remove and inspect the ejector but the pin would not budge and it bent two of my punches. Does anyone have any ideas on how to secure the ejector so it will not become loose again?
 

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Yeah, there's a lot of cyber-smithing going on here these days. Take it to a GS or send it back to Ruger.

Red loctite won't cut it. At the very least you need a "sleeve retainer" type of compound, similar to Loctite green. The pin needs to come out, and potentially a new ejector fitted with a shallower groove (or cut lower towards the frame) on the ejector leg to accomodate the pin and keep it snug.
 

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Here's some 'cyber-smithing' for ya - forget about it. When the slide is on the frame, the ejector can't move but so much, so if its a little loose it doesn't matter. You already proved in an idiotic sort of way that the pin is not coming out. So y'all just put that in your pipe and smoke it.
 

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Well, yeah that too. :)

The ejector isn't going anywhere. You may experience erratic ejection however. Not to be confused with premature.......awww, nevermind.
 

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I'm not f familiar with ruger 1911s. Are the electors pinned? If so, the pin, then ejector need to be removed before any loctite is applied. The ejector and frame holes need to be degreased for the loctite to be effective.
 

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Here's some 'cyber-smithing' for ya - forget about it. When the slide is on the frame, the ejector can't move but so much, so if its a little loose it doesn't matter. You already proved in an idiotic sort of way that the pin is not coming out. So y'all just put that in your pipe and smoke it.
-- Best advice on the thread so far. I know everyone wants everything to be bank vault tight these days, but I have a few 1911s that exhibit a little wiggle in their ejectors, and they run just fine. Unless it's giving you trouble, I'd just shoot it and get on with my life.
 

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but I have a few 1911s that exhibit a little wiggle in their ejectors, and they run just fine. Unless it's giving you trouble, I'd just shoot it and get on with my life.
Some of us are just a bit more compulsive about having things the way they should be, that's all. :dope:
 

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Yeah, there's a lot of cyber-smithing going on here these days. Take it to a GS or send it back to Ruger.

Red loctite won't cut it. At the very least you need a "sleeve retainer" type of compound, similar to Loctite green. The pin needs to come out, and potentially a new ejector fitted with a shallower groove (or cut lower towards the frame) on the ejector leg to accomodate the pin and keep it snug.
Actually the groove would have to be cut slightly higher, on the new ejector leg to force it down tighter.

Red will do fine, however a thorough wash with alcohol and blow dry to remove as much oil as possible is needed. I'd do that a couple times, then add a drop of Loctite, and wiggle the ejector a bit to get it to leech down the hole. If done well it will hold. Loctite doesn't dry, it goes off in the absence of oxygen, and cures. Most in an hour, or less.


Some of us are just a bit more compulsive about having things the way they should be, that's all. :dope:
Okay. :dope:

LOG

Good to hear.
 

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Actually the groove would have to be cut slightly higher, on the new ejector leg to force it down tighter.
Ah of course. I need to stop working on my pistols upside down. LOL

You have just reconfirmed that all advice given on this site should be PROFESSIONALLY verifired.

I'm really not a fan of red Loctite however. There's better stuff out there...
 

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Ah of course. I need to stop working on my pistols upside down. LOL

You have just reconfirmed that all advice given on this site should be PROFESSIONALLY verifired.

I'm really not a fan of red Loctite however. There's better stuff out there...
Always easy to be critical once something is stated.;)

There are a number of different Loctite offerings that are red, as well as the other common Loctite colors of blue and green, so obviously the color isn't really the defining property of a particular Loctite product. That said, most all of the Loctite anaerobic offerings would work well at locking the ejector in place, if it is completely in place.

I cringe as well as to not doing it the "correct" way, however in light of the situation, alternate methods can work quite well. Attempting to remove an ejector only installed with Loctite, without the required heat, will make it clear it can do the job, and do it well. It depends on how well applied, cleanliness, and material it is used on, often the use of the correct primer before hand makes a huge difference in cured strength.

What is the "better stuff out there...."? I'm always interested in better stuff!

LOG
 

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What is the "better stuff out there...."? I'm always interested in better stuff!
Red works well on threaded surfaces. Green is a sleeve and bearing retainer that is better suited to small gaps and smooth bearing and mating surfaces, and has wicking properties to get into all those little holes 1911s have.
 

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Red works well on threaded surfaces. Green is a sleeve and bearing retainer that is better suited to small gaps and smooth bearing and mating surfaces, and has wicking properties to get into all those little holes 1911s have.
Sure, but if carefully applied the results are surprisingly good. Green wicking #290 should not be confused with the heavier green gap filling formulas as it is quite thin. Going to the Loctite website, and spending some time will show a lot of different formulas, with different properties with in the same color.

I do like the #290 for assembled parts, you can put a drop on one side of a sight dovetail and see it appear on the other.

LOG
 

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The type of Loctite being discussed here is not really an adhesive. It is intended to prevent nuts/screws from rotating. When used in the proper setting, there is not a lot of force put on the Loctite. However, in this application there is some lateral force being applied. This will easily break the hold from red Loctite.

In this application any adhesive is only a band aid. It won't fix the problem at hand; at least not for long. Then again, like others have said, this isn't really a problem.

Ejector wiggle is a simple fit issue. The legs of the ejector are a tiny bit smaller than the holes they sit in. The roll pin is not perfectly matched with the cut in the front ejector leg. You could order another ejector, but you'll likely have the same issue.
 

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The type of Loctite being discussed here is not really an adhesive. It is intended to prevent nuts/screws from rotating. When used in the proper setting, there is not a lot of force put on the Loctite. However, in this application there is some lateral force being applied. This will easily break the hold from red Loctite.

In this application any adhesive is only a band aid. It won't fix the problem at hand; at least not for long. Then again, like others have said, this isn't really a problem.

Ejector wiggle is a simple fit issue. The legs of the ejector are a tiny bit smaller than the holes they sit in. The roll pin is not perfectly matched with the cut in the front ejector leg. You could order another ejector, but you'll likely have the same issue.
You are correct, however Loctite does fill the space and does adhere quite well to clean metal. It does bond pretty well as anyone can attest to after taking it apart and finding the Loctite residue difficult to completely remove. If Loctite was used on the sights for instance, it will not blue until all the residue is mechanically removed. Pretty tenacious how it works in threads or sleeves, or dovetails. Springfield does use Loctite to hold in their ejectors without any cross pin at all. Some do fail, however some cross pin failures occur as well such as this one. Attention to detail makes the difference. Don't summarily discount a different approach. I have three Springfied 1911's, none have a cross pin no failures after 1000's of rounds. So...

LOG
 

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IMHO, a loose ejector should be repaired when it's convenient to do. If you leave it alone and it continues to wiggle, the likelihood that one of the legs will break off increases with time. The ejector gets a pretty good little whack for every round that is fired. And as mentioned above, the ejection pattern is typically more consistent with a rigid ejector mounting.

I'm with Log Man that the mechanical mounting has to be fixed correctly and the ejector replaced if necessary. Then the adhesive gets applied to bone-dry parts before assembly. I'm much less interested in the color of the loctite than I am that it's applied in an environment which is conducive to it's correctly bonding the parts being assembled.

If you have a cross pin that won't come out, there's some chance that someone got a bunch of adhesive into that hole when they were gluing the ejector in place. Strip the frame and apply heat from a propane (or hotter) torch until you get a little smoke from the ends of the pin. Apply the heat from the rear wall of the mag well, closest to the pin.

If it still won't come out, you've got a problem on your hands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So what is the best environment? I did have one other gun on which the ejector was loose. Before putting the loctite I put it in an oven at 275 degrees for about 30 minutes to drive the oil out of the metal. I then put a hairdryer blowing at full speed and its highest heat on the ejector for another 30 minutes to hopefully drive any oil vapors out of the holes. I then applied a lot of loctite and wiggled the ejector to get the loctite down the holes. So far I have 400 rounds through that gun since then and the ejector has not moved.

I did not take all the above steps on the Ruger and it is moving again. Maybe I should do with it like I did with the other gun above. Are there any other environmental conditions that will make it bond stronger other than what I described above?
 

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So what is the best environment? I did have one other gun on which the ejector was loose. Before putting the loctite I put it in an oven at 275 degrees for about 30 minutes to drive the oil out of the metal. I then put a hairdryer blowing at full speed and its highest heat on the ejector for another 30 minutes to hopefully drive any oil vapors out of the holes. I then applied a lot of loctite and wiggled the ejector to get the loctite down the holes. So far I have 400 rounds through that gun since then and the ejector has not moved.

I did not take all the above steps on the Ruger and it is moving again. Maybe I should do with it like I did with the other gun above. Are there any other environmental conditions that will make it bond stronger other than what I described above?
I use BrakeKleen and a tiny round nylon brush to clean out the hole and compressed air to make it dry. The oven is a good plan too and if I had one in the shop, I'd possibly do that after the BrakeKleen. The only other thing I can suggest is to use the correct Loctite primer for the particular adhesive you are using. I don't do that myself, but that's more because I never seem or remember to order any.
 

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Acetone and a q tip + compressed air worked for me.

1$ store superglue held for over 6,000 rds but is finally starting to loosen.



Jon
 

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I've found that super glue gets too brittle for firearms use and maybe doesn't like the petroleum lubricant/cleaner environment either. I use red loctite on everything on a 1911 except small screws that might someday have to be removed.
 
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