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Try CFE Pistol.
Its a bit snappy, but its like a self cleaning oven!!
I use CFE Pistol under my Hornady 230 XTP bullets. 6.6 gr is a handful in a lightweight commander.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
Just a little update here. After reseating some bullets this morning at: 1.245, 1.235, 1.230 and finally at 1.225 and using a light load of 5.0 gr of HP-38 w/CCI LPP. The closer I got to 1.225 C.O.L. the less burnt flakes floating around in my gun I had. However, had many ejection issues and failure to lock back on empty mag. While keeping the C.O.L. at 1.225 I used the same load using Winchester and Federal LPP. Winchester turned out to be the primer that performed the best, then Federal and lastly the CCI. This was the same result throughout loads from 5.0 to 5.4gr. Hodgdon powder bottle says max load should be 5.6 which I did not do this time.
 

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Does this mean that loading the case (more) full would lead to (less) unburned powder?

I would have thought exactly the opposite. Luckily I'm loading very moderately, so there's plenty of room to experiment. The bummer part is I already loaded a thousand rounds like that. Ain't no way I'm pulling a thousand bullets.
Up to a point, yes. Some powders will leave some unburned residue no matter how hot the load or how full the case. That's just that particular powder's chemistry at work. Generally speaking, however, the more full the case is, the higher the initial pressure, the more consistent the pressure curve is, and the more complete the burn is. Air space disrupts the flame front and dampens the pressure curve, which leads to erratic ignition. People sometimes use fillers to eliminate the air space and to keep all the powder next to the primer, but that adds nonreactive mass that can raise pressures with no corresponding increase in speed. Finding an appropriate powder that gives 80% or better case fill takes care of the air space, while eliminating the issues associated with fillers.
 

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Up to a point, yes. Some powders will leave some unburned residue no matter how hot the load or how full the case. That's just that particular powder's chemistry at work. Generally speaking, however, the more full the case is, the higher the initial pressure, the more consistent the pressure curve is, and the more complete the burn is. Air space disrupts the flame front and dampens the pressure curve, which leads to erratic ignition. People sometimes use fillers to eliminate the air space and to keep all the powder next to the primer, but that adds nonreactive mass that can raise pressures with no corresponding increase in speed. Finding an appropriate powder that gives 80% or better case fill takes care of the air space, while eliminating the issues associated with fillers.
Yes sir, counterintuitive at first. But I understand. Thank you for the response. Very helpful.
 

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Read through this thread and I’ll have to pay attention to any flakes left over. I’m hopefully going to get to the range today to shoot more of my first batch of 45 acp 230 gr with Titegroup powder. I was surprised to see how much space in the case there still was after the powder drop. So, is it the powder, the bullet or technique that leads to the flakes/residue?
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Plantar, in my case I believe it's more ME than anything else. I was using the C.O.L. from Remington 230gr FMJ round nose bullet and subtracting a little bit to get my original 1.255-1.260 C.O.L. dimension. Once I worked my way down to the 1.225 C.O.L. and setting my load charge closer to max. I was getting less and less left over flakes. By the way, my bottle of HP-38 calls for a C.O.L. of 1.225 with a max charge of 1.225 for a CAST LSWC bullet. I figured a round nose bullet would be a little longer than a semi wad cutter, so I coupled that with my logic of subtracting from the factory 230 gr bullet. I couldn't find any information about the particular bullet I was using. If that makes any sense to you.
 

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Remember typically the OAL given by the powder manufacturer is a data point not a recommendation. They are giving you the pressure results for that particular set up.
 

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Plantar, in my case I believe it's more ME than anything else. I was using the C.O.L. from Remington 230gr FMJ round nose bullet and subtracting a little bit to get my original 1.255-1.260 C.O.L. dimension. Once I worked my way down to the 1.225 C.O.L. and setting my load charge closer to max. I was getting less and less left over flakes. By the way, my bottle of HP-38 calls for a C.O.L. of 1.225 with a max charge of 1.225 for a CAST LSWC bullet. I figured a round nose bullet would be a little longer than a semi wad cutter, so I coupled that with my logic of subtracting from the factory 230 gr bullet. I couldn't find any information about the particular bullet I was using. If that makes any sense to you.
This is interesting. I have used 5.4 gr of 231 with a 1.25” OAL (230fmj) for years without flakes flying everywhere. This may be as simple as your particular chamber seal and/or sizing die not quite getting you down to where you need to be. Rifling? Barrel cut? No two guns are the same. I would be curious to see if some good ole’ Wolf steel would spit all over you!💥
 

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Discussion Starter #51
This is interesting. I have used 5.4 gr of 231 with a 1.25” OAL (230fmj) for years without flakes flying everywhere. This may be as simple as your particular chamber seal and/or sizing die not quite getting you down to where you need to be. Rifling? Barrel cut? No two guns are the same. I would be curious to see if some good ole’ Wolf steel would spit all over you!💥
Yeah I'm not sure what the issue is to be honest. But I did notice a large improvement so far as I go shorter in my O.A.L. and slowly work my way up in load charge. I have had no problems with my pistol going into battery with the shorter rounds. Although with the weaker loads, 5.0gr I have had a few cases not ejecting completely before getting caught by the slide returning into battery. I also even had my first squib round. The bullet just barely made it into barrel:( I'm really thinking this is all because of the 200gr plated round nose bullets I'm using.
 

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The Hornady 10th has data on several 200 grainers that get into the low 6’s for charge weight.
Although none are RN. The HAP in that weight has been blasted at a flat 6 grains forever and is a favorite SD round for some......
 

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Discussion Starter #53
Thanks Nitro. I've been trying to hit the LGS:s in my area but as of yet I can't find that one. Looks like I might have to resort to Amazon :( or order it right from Hornady. Which might be the best way to go.
 

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I was having the same problem when I first started reloading 45’s. It turned out that I wasn’t crimping enough. A fellow on our local reloading group suggested that I take my reloaded cartridge and press it firmly done against the bench. If the oal shortens, your crimp isn’t set right. He also suggested using a Lee factory crimp die.
I know that this sounds pretty primitive, but as a new reloader, it really helped me! I had four reloading manuals and they were all pretty vague on crimping. I thought I was following the Dillon crimp die instructions, but apparently when it says you go another 1/2-3/4 turn once you feel resistance on the die, my interpretation of resistance was not quite right.
 

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You said you are loading your 200 gr. rounds to 1.255/1.260 COL. The Hodgdon manual suggests a COL as 1.155. This would increase chamber pressure and enhance cleaner burn. The COL you are currently using is longer than that of a 230 gr. FMJ. Just my opinion.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
You said you are loading your 200 gr. rounds to 1.255/1.260 COL. The Hodgdon manual suggests a COL as 1.155. This would increase chamber pressure and enhance cleaner burn. The COL you are currently using is longer than that of a 230 gr. FMJ. Just my opinion.
That was my original starting C.O.L. I measured some factory Remington 230gr. FMJ round nose which averaged out to be 1.255/1.260. Since that didn't work, I shrunk my C.O.L. down to 1.225. Which is what my bottle of HP-38 says to use for a 200gr. Cast LSWC bullet. This dimension seems to be working much better and I honestly don't think I can go much shorter than that using these bullets without getting into the taper of it. I also increased my powder load to 5.4gr.
 

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W231/HP38 tends to be pretty dirty. The "goldish sawdust" is in fact residue from burned powder!

For really clean burning powder look at WST!

I shoot a similar cast bullet with soft lube and charge of W231 with good results and just put up with the soot and "smutz"!

Welcome to the challenges and mysteries of reloading!

Smiles,
When it comes to 45acp anything. That's all I use. The results is in it's name. Winchester Super Target. WST
Great stuff. I shoot X-Tream 200gn RN plated bullets, 4.9gn WST Fed lg. primers / CCI #300 primers. Mixed head stamps.
It averages 830fps, per my LabRadar. I consider it my target load for my RO Target, and XDM. The ADDED PLUS is,,
Its CLEAN burning. If I were the Author of this thread, I would change powders, "WST" Check my seating death,
and use a Lee Factory Crimp Die, and kiss all them problems good by..
 
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