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Go to www.gunbroker.com and put in auction number 87829248. Whoever did this to this gun should be shot with it....:mad:

Bob
 

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That was hot sh*t in its day. The front trigger cocked the hammer and then hit the back trigger that was the normal single action trigger. Another answer to the question nobody asked.
 

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I sometimes have to remind myself that many of the current generation of shooters/collectors have never heard of the past masters like Larry Seecamp. While I agree that an older Colt would be more desireable in original trim, this gun is a righteous deal in its own right to a collector of such. And there are a few out there. In the 70's, Larry Seecamp was an icon. His son is currently building the small Seecamp 32s and 38s that are considered highly desireable as a deep cover gun.
 

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I rememeber when this conversion came out...and he was a great inventor and innovator. It is just a shame his conversion ended up up on a collector grade gun...

On a 70s vintage gun this conversion would have enhansed the value of the gun. Done to this one, it cut the value by up to 3/4s....

Bob
 

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I too remember reading in gun magazines about Seecamp conversions. Their work is not a hack job and for awhile was all the rage with people who thought Government Models needed to be double action. I think Jeff Cooper made the statement that it solved a problem that didn't exist or something like that. I always thought of them as a quality kind of Rube Goldberg machine. I agree that it's too bad that a nice old Super .38 was altered like that. If it were left alone in 90 % or better condition, it would be worth far more than what the seller is asking. But, who knew? Look at all the nice old military pistols that have been chopped up one way or another. I suppose that's part of what makes the pristine examples worth so much.

Here's a bit about Seecamp. They're still in business.

http://seecamp.com/companyhistory.htm
 

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I had friends years ago that had Secamp conversions on their .45s, but they were a little beyond my price range.

Thanks for the site link. I bookmarked it. I wonder if AMT paid Secamp for the use of the patents on their DAO backup line of pistols. Without going too far off thread, here is my AMT .45 Backup.

 

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While I agree that it would be a "nicer" gun in stock form, Seecamp-converted guns have a bit of collectibility of their own. Seecamp was a true innovator, and some of his designs carry on today. I see Seecamp's cartouche on the frame, just above the trigger, so it is a real Seecamp conversion, and not something built by an anonymous "gunsmith" using a Seecamp kit.
I do have one question, though; where's the serial number? Usually, the number had to be moved, as the area where the number was stamped is milled away for the DA action bar. I don't see the number on either side of the frame.
 

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While I am not a big fan of the look, several collectors would drool over that gun and would not hesitate to pay that amount. I think the interesting point to ponder is whether the modifications we do today will be seen as outdated in 10-20 years. I.e., will a Ted Yost gun hold the same value in 20 years, or will all the machining at that time be so good that the base model is as good if not better than his work?
 

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I'm not a fan of Seecamp, but I have to disagree that this ruined the value of the gun, the work is top notch, and in excellent condition, it is a collectable historic modified gun, and very rare, it may be more valuable in some circles than if it were bone stock.

My opinion,...very collectable.
 

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I saw a very nice Seacamp conversion on a Series 70 at my local gun show a few months ago. The thing was in 98%-99% condition, just emaculate and was listed at $1200.00 I believe.

I would have bought it if I was prepared - just to have it in the collection. The seller was from out of state and he hasn't been back since. For the price, I regret that one!
 

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mr1911 said:
I'm not a fan of Seecamp, but I have to disagree that this ruined the value of the gun, the work is top notch, and in excellent condition, it is a collectable historic modified gun, and very rare, it may be more valuable in some circles than if it were bone stock.

My opinion,...very collectable.
I don't think so...not a 1928 model! MAYBE a 1970s but NOT a 1928!
 

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Seecamp on production gun - ODI Viking

I have a Colt Commander clone made by a company called Omega Defense Industries (ODI) that includes a Seecamp trigger installed at the factory when the gun was made, in 1981 or so. The company, located in New Jersey, only was in business for a year or two.

The gun is .45 caliber and all stainless, and can be fired double action from the trigger or single action by cocking the hammer. The Seecamp trigger is quite heavy and not very practical.

 

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I don't think so...not a 1928 model! MAYBE a 1970s but NOT a 1928!
Interesting gun but I'm not sure it is what the seller identified it as. Colt introduced the .38 Super in 1929, not 28. The markings on the slide look like those on guns from a couple of decades later, I'm not sure without looking it up some, but it may be a later slide on an earlier frame. The sights are not original of course.

Had it been an original first year gun, even with the conversion, it would have been snatched up at 1500 I think. But it received no bids.

A first year .38 Super with the Seecamp conversion might be worth 1500. But I'm thinking something might be hinckey with it. I also kind of wonder if Seecamp would have done the work on a pristine gun even in the 70s.

tipoc
 
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