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I was over on Gunboards, and they had a thread concerning the Auto Ordnance 1911. The thread seemed to deteriorate into a put down of anyone who used cast frames and slides. For some reason the forum would not let me post, and I really need to " get this one out " bugging the hell out of me to put it mildly. Here is my take on it: Forged parts require a softer grade of steel that is then heat treated after all of the machining operations. The reason is that you would quite rapidly wear out your tooling. problem is: heat treatment causes warpage. Cast parts on the other hand can use a tougher, harder grade of steel from the get go since very little machining is required. Ruger has a legendary reputation for 'toughness" and they are all cast. Ruger casts for S&W, Sig, Caspian, and many others. FN had to go to cast frames and slides on their Hi-Powers because the forged ones would not stand up to the 40S&W or +P, +P+ 9mm. One person over on the other forum suggested that people buy a good old forged Norinco! They said it was superior to all of these cast 1911's. Excuse Me!!!! I don't care how it is made, Chinese steel is junk! Anyway, everyone seemed to think that Auto Ordnance as now made by Kahr was junk too. AO has their frames and slides cast of very high quality steel in Spain; Kahr then does final fit and finish here in US. They are no longer parts bin throw togethers as in days of old. I'd kind of like to hear what you all think on this subject.
 

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forged frames and slides are heat treated before machining to avoid warping. But properly cast parts can be very strong if done correctly. As far as Norinco 1911 steel goes it is known for being some of the best around.
 

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I believe durability mostly depends on the quality of metal to begin with. The quality of the original material dictates the final outcome, wether its cast or forged.
 

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I think the big parts like frame and slide have such great reserves of strength that the method of fabrication doesn't make a lot of difference in the final product. If a manufacturer can get cheaper blanks off of otherwise idle S&W forges or from a Pinetree/Ruger foundry, it makes little difference to me, as long as they machine them accurately.

I'd rather any extra margin be put into better small parts where ersatz can really hurt function.
 
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