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s/n puts it circa 1913

stamped "c 18363"




Problem with it is that someone etched their name on the slide of the slide.


Owners wants $999 for it.


I think, the name etching can be polished out. If I were seriously interested in buying it,

a. what is it worth
b. what should I offer
c. can that slide be polished/blended (doesn't look deep)
d. can I have it refinished to look decent? (of course I can, but is it worth all the effort?)
e. what would it be worth after all the work.


I have no way of knowing anything else about it, how many original parts, etc.

just looking at it...
 

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s/n puts it circa 1913

stamped "c 18363"




Problem with it is that someone etched their name on the slide of the slide.


Owners wants $999 for it.


I think, the name etching can be polished out. If I were seriously interested in buying it,

a. what is it worth
b. what should I offer
c. can that slide be polished/blended (doesn't look deep)
d. can I have it refinished to look decent? (of course I can, but is it worth all the effort?)
e. what would it be worth after all the work.


I have no way of knowing anything else about it, how many original parts, etc.

just looking at it...
Thats unfortunate, I have seen Colt's where people have engraved thier Drivers License number into the frame.

Sad thing is, whether it's kept as is or it was polished out, it will never be worth much to a collector. After it's polished out and refinished it would be a nice looking shooter.

Depending on the condition, it's probably not worth much more than just over $600 - $700 I would say...perhaps more but right now it's a shooter. Can you get a picture??
 

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Commercial pistols usually must have an intact original finish of 90% or better to be of much interest to a collector. Unfortunately the name etched on the slide has pretty much ruined it for use as anything but a shooter, unless that name happens to be Theodore Roosevelt Jr. or somebody similar. ;)

With military-issue pistols there's usually a bit more consideration given for finish wear and minor defacing, since it was pretty common for weapons to get banged up in use or be messed with by bored servicemen attempting some form of "trench art".
 

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I agree with what was said above, but I am going to be even more conservative. Unless the serial number or name on the slide can be shown to have historical significance, then $400-$500.

I recently bought a brand new Colt Commander in blue for $750, and it is good. Very good. I have been buying pristine Gold Cups made in the 1980s in the $650 to $850 range. Why would something that old for more money that is not in great shape and has no historical significance be worth that much?
 

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I agree with what was said above, but I am going to be even more conservative. Unless the serial number or name on the slide can be shown to have historical significance, then $400-$500.

thats a hard sale, i passed up a beautiful minty ww2 gi colt that had "us property " ground off of it. eventually someone bought it, around $700 i think. without the grind marks, i know it would have been out of my price range.
honest scratches are ok, even idiot marks don't bother me. someone's name though .. . . :bawling::barf::bawling:
 

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Sadly it is pretty common to see. I have seen several old guns which, back in the day when owning a Dremel was new cutting edge technology, owners wrote their names. Dad dies and son, daughter, wife, landlord or whoever pawns it or otherwise sells or disposes of it. Then we encounter it and have to decide. I too am guilty of this. An old Nylon 66 I purchased when Nylon was a new cutting edge material for a rifle stock has my name stamped in the sheet metal receiver. [Still have it, one of the most inaccurate .22s I have ever fired, but a great fun gun back from the long vanished days when you could walk into a field near your house and roll a tin can around and not worry about where the ricochets went, cause nothing else was near bye, or in range.] Don't ask me why, just say kids do the dumbest stuff. A pawn shop once sold me a Ruger Mk. I once with someone's name dremeled on the side. As a rabbit and tin can shooter, I didn't care. If the seller can produce a historical letter from Colt showing a purchaser name that matches the name engraved on the gun, that preserves (in my opinion) the collectible nature of the pistol. However individual purchases direct from Colt by mail order pretty much stopped with the passage of the (hated) Dodd Bill back in 1968, so the odds of encountering one of those at an affordable price become increasingly rare.
 
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