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Discussion Starter #1
Well I found this on line and debated if I should post it or not. Was worried about the potential for accidents but figured most if not all here are handling firearms then they should able to handle it



Kitchen Stove Parkerizing

By Dick Culver

NOTE: I originally gave this formula to an interested individual when we were posting on the Ohio site, but it was lost in the transfer. I publish it again here with the disclaimer that I don’t wanna’ be responsible for anyone ruining a $1000 part or becoming a vegetable from inhaling the fumes from some noxious brew. I’ve done it on numerous occasions with no ill effect (some will differ in their opinion of my mental state of course) but if you choose to play around with chemical formulas, you are strictly on your own!

ROC

INSTRUCTIONS FOR "HOME-BREW" PARKERIZING:

You need a number of things to do a "home-brew" "Parker-job", but only 4 ingredients.

1. Phosphoric Acid (the active ingredient in Naval Jelly) usually procured at a chemical supply house.

2. Powdered Manganese Dioxide (a very dense and heavy dark gray to black powder) also available at any chemical supply house.

3. Distilled water (I’ve used tap water, but the distilled stuff gives more consistent results.

4. A biscuit of steel wool (don’t use soap pads or Brillo pads!)

I used to do this on the kitchen stove (I wasn’t married in those days) in a one gallon Pyrex beaker (these little beasts are expensive, so be careful with them). Metal pots don’t work as well (if at all) I understand, but then I never used anything else but Pyrex.



Proceed as follows:

1. Use one whiskey jigger (yeah, this is really scientific, right?) of phosphoric acid added to the water. Remember your high school chemistry, ALWAYS add the acid to the water, and it is best done by pouring it down a glass rod!

2. Use one whiskey jigger of the (powdered) Manganese Dioxide in the solution.

3. Bring the solution to an extremely slooowwww rolling boil .

4. Now add your biscuit of steel wool.

I used wooden sticks placed across the top of the beaker and suspended the parts in the solution using steel or iron "machinist’s wire or some such. DON’T use painted coat hangers or any wire with grease on it! You can usually get this stuff from a machine shop or from Brownell’s.

The parts should be totally immersed in the solution, being careful that anywhere the wire touches the part won’t show on the finished part (usually easy to do – like in the firing pin hole of a bolt). The part(s) to be Parkerized should be totally "de-greased" and sand or bead blasted prior to finishing (depending on the texture you desire on the finished part). Once you have bead blasted the part, you should handle the part with gloves (never greasy hands) and store them wrapped in clean paper towels awaiting the Parker Bath. Any grease on the parts or wire will cause what can only be politely called a variation in color (the parts come out streaked and spotted like a "paint horse").

I usually let the part remain in the solution for a total of 20 minutes (less MAY work, but I was told 20 minutes so that’s what I used and it worked marvelously). When you withdraw the part, immediately rinse it in hot running water to get the solution off of it. Use extremely hot water, and the part will dry itself. Let it dry (and get cool enough to touch) on some clean paper towels, spray on some lubricant and viola’ you are done!

Rumor control said that if you immersed the freshly rinsed and still hot part in Cosmoline, it would give the sometimes sought after "gray-green" tint to it. I have never tried it. Cosmoline is still available from Brownells if you are adventurous!

The original formula called for iron filings vice steel wool, but since I didn’t have any floating around, and didn’t want to file on the cast iron stove, I found that the steel wool worked just fine. What you get is a chemical reaction that causes an iron phosphate to form on the metal (steel phosphate I suppose, using steel wool). I have found that the resultant finish is just as durable as the Arsenal finishes and has exactly the same appearance! – an attractive dark gray, almost black. Some say that adding more manganese dioxide causes a darker finish, but I’ve never tried it, as I was happy with what I got!

We often used this technique when finishing .45s built on early Essex frames that needed a lot of fitting, thus often requiring the removal of offending metal. I used to checker the front straps (also violating the finish in a rather spectacular fashion) and the resultant finish worked great and showed little or no wear even with extensive use – much like the official GI finish. I’m still using a wadcutter gun I performed the magic on back in the ‘70s and it still looks new.

A couple of cautions:

1. Always be careful of any sort of acid, even such an innocuous acid as phosphoric. I certainly would never deliberately inhale the fumes (although there is no great odor to the process that I could tell, but then I smoke cigars). I started doing this back in the early to mid ‘70s and still have no "twitch" that I can directly attribute to Parkerizing on the kitchen stove. Just use common sense, WEAR GLOVES AND EYE PROTECTION ANYTIME YOU ARE PLAYING AROUND WITH BOILING SOLUTIONS (with or without acids being involved).

2. Be very careful not to cause any splashes with the boiling solution (of course the same can be said of boiling corn).

3. Prepare your area and your parts before hand, don’t try to do this on the spur of the moment.

4. Send your wife to see "Gone With the Wind" or "Titanic" or some other movie that whiles away a number of hours. If you ever want to do this again, make sure the kitchen is spiffy when she returns! In Gloria’s case, she would be attaching the parts, but then I’m just lucky in that respect...

5. Once you have allowed the solution to cool, you are DONE! Re-heating it don’t cut it, It simply doesn’t work (I’ve tried it on several occasions). Have everything that you want to Parkerize ready to go when you fire up the solution. You can keep Parkerizing as long as the solution is hot, but allowing it to get cold kills it – you’ve gotta’ brew up a new solution and start from scratch.

6. Do not name me in any divorce proceedings!

Good luck!
http://www.jouster.com/articles30m1/parkerizing.html



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The defensive firearm is a special-purpose piece of safety rescue equipment, designed to extricate a person . . . from the immediate threat of savagely violent crime. It is like the fire extinguisher. . . . Neither piece of equipment will do you any good if you don't know how to use it or are not psychologically prepared to face danger with that gear in your trained hands in a terror situation.
 

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Thanks for the post. with this new inspiration I think a Do It Your Self parkerizing job is in my future...Thanks Rofi
 

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I just copied your post into Word and saved it. I'm sure I'll wind up trying it sometime, even if I only Parkerize a chuck of steel I use for practicing with my Dremel. Thank you for the post.

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If God didn't want us to own guns, why did He make the 1911?
 

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I saved that one too, never know when it might come in handy. Hmmmmm, a new pistol from the ground up maybe


Mac
 

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Discussion Starter #5
What is the best way to get rid of the old blueing on the pistol? Is it chemical or glass bead blasting? I don't know anything about it at all


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The defensive firearm is a special-purpose piece of safety rescue equipment, designed to extricate a person . . . from the immediate threat of savagely violent crime. It is like the fire extinguisher. . . . Neither piece of equipment will do you any good if you don't know how to use it or are not psychologically prepared to face danger with that gear in your trained hands in a terror situation.
 

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I have heard that Navel Jelly will remove the bluing. There is also a bluing remover you can purchase at WalMart or at any gun dealer in their gun cleaning supplies.

Originally posted by Lupey:
What is the best way to get rid of the old blueing on the pistol? Is it chemical or glass bead blasting? I don't know anything about it at all


 

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hey folks,
leave the refinishing to the gunsmiths,eh?
Just got in a S&W auto that was refinished with cold blue. Ugly.

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1 peter 5:8
 

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Yes, leave it to the gunsmiths. Most of us unwashed are just too simple to understand something as complex as a GUN, after all.

Of course, I may be bitter, considering the last two 'gunsmiths' I visited RUINED a gun each. Now I build my own 1911s, do all my own trigger work, fit match barrels, whatever needs doing, and you know what? It's not that hard! Get the tools, read up and use your head and you'll find it rather easy, actually.

Sorry, I get rather vituperative when people insinuate I can't do something.

Larry

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He who fights and runs away had better run pretty damn fast.
 

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Has anyone tried this yet?
I'm courious about results. Hints, comments...

mike
 

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Well, I was going to try this method.

I called a friend who works at some chemical place and asked if he could bring home the materials needed. He asked his friends at the R&D department and they mixed me up three diferent batches for three different finishes. Aparently more things on this earth are "parkerized" other than guns.

One batch has a nickle additive for what they called for "an extra tough finish". The chemist said the orignal method would work fine, but assured me that what they gave me will be darker in color and very tough.

Total cost, six bucks...if they were going to charge me.

I'll post back on this or another thread to let you know how this works. It may be a while (week or two) because I have yet to prep the gun.
 

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Thanks ehenz,
could you get me their recipe, or at least what nickle additive and amount used? I like the idea of both harder and darker. I was about to order a kit until I found this thread, if your going to do-it-yourself you might as well do it all.

mike
 
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