1911Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Frame to slide refitting on Colt lightweight frame?

I have a fairly new Colt New Agent .45acp , it was my first foray into the 1911 world and it was ok till today.

I had it dehorned , round butt Wilson MSH added and the frame rounded to match, then the entire gun was cerakoted a satin black.

Today I stopped in the store I bought it from looking to get another pistol I had appraised for a possible trade on another 1911. I showed the the owner the work I had done to the Colt and he commented on how loose the slide was, I never noticed or if I did I assumed it was normal. I compared it to a Kimber he had there and the Kimber was rock solid, my Colt sounds like a rattle while I have a death grip on the frame and making sure nothing like the trigger and grip safety will rattle, when you shake the gun the slide rattles on the frame.

He had another New Agent that had come in the same time as the one I bought did, this was 4 months or so ago and when we looked at it same thing, loose slide. That eased my fear that the 'smith I had do the cerakote screwed up my pistol.

After making some measurements the frame has taper from the front of the rails to the rear about .005 , there is about .015 side to side clearance. If i grab the front of the slide I can rock the slide up and down.

I'm assuming this is NOT correct , unfortunately I doubt Colt is going to do anything about it because I had work done to it and they will try to pass the blame to the person that worked on it last.

Is there a way to fix this short of just selling it and buying something else? I'm already $1400 into the gun so I'm upside down no matter what, but if I have to sink another $500 plus into it then I might just as well trade it in and get something else.

Thanks and sorry for the novel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Greg , I just looked it up , interesting way of fixing it. I was envisioning the frame having to be welded and re-cut .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
Silly question:

Does the gun actually have a problem? Has the accuracy or reliability suffered?

It's a common way to dig at the value of your trade when the old salt at the LGS notes how your piece is such a rattle-trap, whilst noting how superior all of -his- inventory is. Of course, they then go on to offer to take that old dog off your hands for $400.

While there is a purist aspect to having a slide-to-frame fit which feels like it's moving on Swiss bearings, functionality rules the day on a working piece. If it's not truly broke, you may not want to fix it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
AzPilot , I can't really say on the reliabilty or the accuracy because I'm just getting back into shooting after not having handled guns for 20 years or so , thank the current dictatorship for leading me back. I haven't had any FTFeed, FTE or FTFire with it, but I've only had maybe 200 rds thru it, if that.

So are you saying that this possible "stacking of tolerances" is acceptable in a $1000 handgun?

The gun store was not appraising this pistol, I was just showing him the changes I had done, he also pointed out to me the trigger creep that I also need to address.

Like I said I'm new to the 1911, I've been selling off my recently purchased plastic guns in favor of more 1911's and I'm thinking now that maybe it's been a mistake?

I really don't want to run this issue off the rails , plastic vs. steel is a debate for a different day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
Durning Defense Customs will weld up and refit the slide to the frame for $165 + shipping. Not too horribly expensive. I'll have Anthony work up my Colt Commander this coming January because it also exhibits quite a bit of "slop." Dead reliable, but I would like for this pistol to last for many tens of thousands of rounds, and starting with a tighter fit is one way of ensuring that. If your pistol is dead reliable, accurate enough for you, and you are happy with it then there is no need to be concerned. Enjoy your Colt and the work you've had done to it to make it your own.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,635 Posts
I concur with Snake. If your gun is reliable and reasonably accurate, I wouldn't worry about it. I have 2 Colts, and while mine are not as loose as yours, they aren't all that tight either. But they are reliable and accurate. Colt makes good guns as far as I'm concerned. I'd just leave it as is and shoot it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,372 Posts
Its fine. He was low balling you. I prefer my 1911s to be slightly rattly. It lets me know they will run easily. Shoot it before you pass judgement.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
More of what I'm getting at, is whether a "rattly" gun really matters to you if it runs like a champ, and shoots better that you're able to.

For some purists, a rattle in a 1911 means it's on the block or off to the smith. However, for some, the gun's actual performance is the critical factor. Of course, if you have a gun which eats everything, shoots lights-out, will run when dirty, and has a tight fit....excelsior to you.

Personally, I could care less about a rattle or an idiot-scratch...as long as the gun runs and hits. However, my 1911s are working guns.

As always, your mileage may vary, some restrictions apply, and you may not rebroadcast this post, in part or in whole without the express written consent of Major League Baseball.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I spoke to colt today , along with other people and also looked at a number of Colts both brand new and used , including a 70's Commander that I was going to buy were it not for the butchering of the slide for an adjustable target sight.

The consensus is a Colt is supposed to sound like it's full of rocks , but this gun is a lot looser than even Colt customer service thinks it should be. They issued me a shipping tag and want to see the gun even after I told them the frame was ground on and the gun was cerakoted. but they may not fix it under warranty and if they do I will probably have to pay to have it re-koted???

If I have to have it re[koted then I may have more work done to it , like flat top the slide in hopes of eliminating the Trench , have it ribbed and cut for sights , probably a Novak cut ?

Here she is ...
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here is a picture of the gap between the frame and slide , also note I can lift the front of the slide more than .010.

Monday night I'm going to the range with a sandbag and prop the gun so it steady just to see how bad either it, or I, really am, along with shooting a friends Springfield Mil spec and possibly a newly acquired Springfield champion commander I stumbled across tonight .
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
Your extractor looks like it's clocking BAD. The one on my Colt Commander was, too. I recommend you fit an oversized firing pin stop with a small radius to improve feed/extraction/ejection reliability.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,872 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I tired to adjust the extractor last night and once I put the stop in it clocked that way no matter how straight I could get it without the stop in place, I even tried doing it with the barrel in place, a round in the barrel and locked in the extractor but then I envisioned the firing pin striking the bullet and putting a hole in my kitchen counter top .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
247 Posts
The extractor clocking is a function of a generous fit of the firing pin stop. Most manufacturers install these under-sized so any stop will go into any pistol.

It's about a $15 fix, plus some file-time, to install an oversized EGW stop. You fit the stop to your particular gun, so the fit is very tight. This will eliminate the clocking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
656 Posts
A couple of comments. The OP said the pistol has a lightweight frame. Don't think there is any welding up and re machining on that one.
I agree that if it runs, don't sweat the rattle. I work more on the barrel to slide fit than the slide to frame fit. A properly fitted bushing will do more for accuracy than rail fit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,231 Posts
A couple of comments. The OP said the pistol has a lightweight frame. Don't think there is any welding up and re machining on that one.
I agree that if it runs, don't sweat the rattle. I work more on the barrel to slide fit than the slide to frame fit. A properly fitted bushing will do more for accuracy than rail fit.
I am ridiculous. Accu rails would be the way to go. I thought the New Agent had a steel frame.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top