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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I shoot with a black front sight on my 1911,
it seems to show up well on targets. Works for me. I've been noticing a few red and orange sights at the matches.

My question is for those who have experimented with different colors. Is this merely a personal preference, or do some light conditions (sunny, overcast etc.) make a specific color more desireable? Do you use paint or nail polish? Did a colored front sight help in engaging targets or in focusing on the sight?

Thanks.
 

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Its hard to beat white. As I get older I find it alot easyer to get a fast sight picture with a white 3 dot set of sights.

I dont care for the reds and greens and so on, but the only ones I have messed with are the "tube" plastic things that gather light, we shoot in bright day light 99% of the time here so I dont need that.

White Out is your friend.. If ya want to do it cheap, start out with just putting it on the front sight untill you get it the where ya like it. Then ya can drill a small hole in the front sight a tad and paint the lil dot in your self. It take alot of time to figure out where ya want the dot.

But if ya dont want to go that way buy a set of novaks 3 dot non night sites with the 3 dot...... I guess the new fad is the gold dot front, I have not shot on one of them yet, but people that have them seem to love it!
 

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I like a white front sight with a fine black outline (not so easy with white out) against a black rear sight.

I can't stand 3 dot sights, and just black out the back 2 dots.

I have taken a dremel tool with a carbide bit in order to turn a 3 dot front sight into a better white front sight. I just open the painted part all the way to the top of the sight. It's like grinding a groove on a plain front sight. I get the black outline, and can easily fill/paint the groove with white out.

This grinding can easily be screwed up, but the other option is replacing the sight anyway, no no big deal.

I'm a little bit too traditional to stick a fiber optic sight on a 1911.
 

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Depends on the light. When shooting outdoors I like an all black setup. When shooting indoors, as much of my current IDPA shooting is, I like having a white dot on the front sight. It makes it a little easier to pick up against the dark background we have at out range.

Tim
 

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How about glowing red or green?

Dawson Awesome Optic on my P16
I really grabs your eye in any light where you can see the target.



postban out
 

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I have always used traditional notch and post Bomar sights. I am now using a Dawson fiber optic sight on my Baer CDP gun and a Caspian fiber optic on my Limited pistol. Both sights are of the narrow variety and I like them a lot. To be honest, I don't know if it's the narrow blade or the red pin, but I wouldn't go back to the old style.
 

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Originally posted by DTW:
I shoot with a black front sight on my 1911,
it seems to show up well on targets. Works for me. I've been noticing a few red and orange sights at the matches.

My question is for those who have experimented with different colors. Is this merely a personal preference, or do some light conditions (sunny, overcast etc.) make a specific color more desireable? Do you use paint or nail polish? Did a colored front sight help in engaging targets or in focusing on the sight?

Thanks.
Somewhere, someone probably has some research on this from an optical standpoint.

I started my pistol shooting (and it was merely informal) by point shooting. After my interest increased and I began to read up as well as correspond with Jeff Cooper - and boy did I ask some really *stupid* questions (but he is such a gentleman!). He was a vocal advocate of using the sights and I asked him about color. He said he personally used black but that some of his contemporaries used red fingernail polish.

I experimented with a lot of "gaudy" (for the time, now they are extremely gaudy) colors. Red was never bright enough. Yellow was nice but blended in with grass (and I shot a lot of ground hogs, usually in green grass but sometimes there was broomsage behind them). White showed up in dim light but "washed out" on many targets in the field (would have been ideal on black paper though). Lime Green and Pale Blue were also high contrast but they too did not do it for me.

Finally I settled on hunter orange but I had to settle for model paint until a few years ago when nail polish finally caught on in this color. I tried inserts but they really don't do well on an auto (I do have one on my .22 conversion and one Wilson with a really small front sight).

To me the idea was to have a sight that "drew my attention" to the front sight every time I pulled the gun up into my vision - I beleive I start seing it as it comes up in my periferal vision. Apparently it worked, and still does.

For deliberate shooting, I don't think I gain a thing, in fact black sights seem "crisper" but the orange sure catches my eye at speed.

I don't care for the new fangled fibre optic sights - they hardly seem apropos on a fighitng pistol. Actually they are not new, it is an old idea just new for a pistol (I have had a "glow-worm" on my Double barrel shotgun since 1966 but it is half broken and I had to super glue it to keep it in place)

Something else that is not new is "express" sights. I put a brass bead on a 1911 right after reading Shooting to Live by Fairbairn and Sykes (of course it was written before WWII but I did not know about it). They did not seem any faster than the orange front sight and they were decidely inferior at 75 to 100 yards.

We actually had a pistol that had been issued to the Shanghi Municiple Police. It did not have express sights but regular 1911a1 sights. It did have a pin hole in the frame where the thumb safety must have been pinned down - another Fairbairn idea. Oh, if that pistol could talk :)

Just rambling,
Jim Higginbotham
 

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For strictly target work, I like a plain black front post, with a plain black rear that has a wide notch to allow a lot of light on either side of the front sight.

For tactical/practical, I like a chartreuse (flourescent green) front. I am able to pick this colour up much faster than any other I've tried.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, guys. I have fiber optic sights on my bows and my shotgun, they do the job there.

The black sight on my 1911 seems crisp enough for precision work, but you're allways interested in a way to better track the front sight during multi-shot strings.

Looks like I'll be experimenting.
 

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The problem I've heard of the fiber front sights are two fold. One is the tendency to shoot to fast because all your attention is drawn to the frontsight and not it's propper alignment. The other
 

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The problem I've heard of the fiber front sights are two fold. One is the tendency to shoot to fast because all your attention is drawn to the frontsight and not it's propper alignment. The other is the probability of taking sight pictures off of two different parts of the sight, meaning sighting in off the top of the blade but then shooting off the optic, which also obscures your target. I perfer a thin(.085 right now) front partridge blade, although the stepped blade intrest me.
 

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I use day glow orange paint. I get fast target acquisition in day or low light conditions. The orange draws my attention to the front quicker than using the three white dot system that came originally.l
zombie
 
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