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Do LEOs always hold a bad opinion of 'bountyhunters'.
Should'nt they work together. What problems do they pose for LEOs?
Garry
 

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Before becoming a police officer, I woked as a bounty hunter in the inner city of Kansas City MO. I quickly learned that the majority of LEO's did not care for us very much.
I understand completely that bounty hunters provide a service that saves tax payers tons of money each year, and would sincerely like to believe that the average bounty hunter is well trained, and level headed....but you and I both know that that is not the norm.
When I worked as a law enforcement officer...my oppinion of bounty hunters became very negative for several reasons.

1) The average bounty hunter in the K.C.M.O area has absolutely no training whatsoever, and none is required
2) They work as independent contractors....not as an employee of a bondsman...If they do something wrong, most are not insured to cover any damages.
3) Most seem to think of themselves as members of some tactical unit, and act overly agressively creating a situation that requires the police to be called to an already escalated disturbance
4) And most importantly....Many bounty hunters portray themselves falsely as law enforcement officers of some sort, or another, and the public..in general percieves them as such. When a group of untrained bounty hunters goes into a neighborhood, and draws negative attention to themselves...it creates unnescesary hostility towards the police.
I will give an example....
When I was working as a bounty hunter...myself, and 2 other guys went into one of the worst neighborhoods in Kansas City at around 1:00 am to pick up a female who had skipped on a misdemeanor charge. When we arrived in the area, we noticed a large group of males hanging out on the front lawn of a residence across the street from the subjects house. We parked a couple of houses down, and continued to keep an eye on the group across the street as we approached the address on our bond. When we announced ourselves at the door of the residence, we were greeted by the sister of the woman we were looking for, and she agreed to let us search...stating that her sister no longer lived at the address.
By this time...the group across the street had began to yell obsenities, and threats, so we left one guy posted at the front door, while myself, and my other partner searched. The guy at the door was to yell if there were any problems, and we would contact the P.D for assistance.
When we had finished our search, we retuned to the front porch, and saw that there were several of the males now in the street...making blatant threats to our lives. We asked the guy who had stayed at the door if he had seen anyone come across the road, and he said "NO".
We then proceeded to our vehicle, and quickly got in. Not noticing that all four tires had been slashed. as soon as we began to move, it became appearent that there was going to be a problem with the vehicle....so we drove slowly for about 1 block North, then 1 block east. We then stopped on the side of a very busy road with our emergency flashers on, and called for a bondsman from our office to get us a tow ( He also ran a tow service). After approximately 2 minutes of waiting...one of the other guys noticed a group of several males walking through a vacant lot to our South...about 100 yards away. Two of them were carrying long guns in open view.
The police were contacted by cell phone, and we immediately stepped out of the vehicle and ran to the side opposite the group. I was the only one of us armed with a long gun, and I took aim, and although I was scared to death...I began shouting commands at the group. After only a few seconds ( that seemed like an eternity) the group had retreated on foot...still making verbal threats. the police were on the scene shortly thereafter, and even after showing them the house...no positive I.D could be made on any individual...therefore no arrests were made.
About 2 weeks after this incident, a K.C.P.D police car was fired upon from the same block that this had occured on. Luckily no officers were injured in this incident, but no suspects were apprehended either. A few days later, another police car was fired upon with an AK type rifle, and this time an officer was injured...but luckily not killed.
In the end...2 suspects were arrested, and convicted in connection with these incidents. Both of them resided at the same address where our group of males was hanging out that night.
I shortly thereafter joined the police academy, and would never again consider doing that type of work.

Sorry for the long post...but, I had to address this subject thoroughly. If you happen to work in the field of bail enforcement...get as much training under your belt as you possibly can, and be safe, and proffessional at all times!
 

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Pointman hit the nail on the head...The better bail agents are BETTER at what they do than the majority of "fugitive units", but regulation of the industry is inconsistent from state to state. Bountyhunting is a lot like the Executive Protection field. There are some really, really, well qualified people out there, but the untrained, unqualified "goons" give the profession a bad image.:(
 

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The few bounty hunters I've met were really no better, imho, than the people they were trying to catch. Though I'm not an LEO, I don't think anyone has a very high opinion of bounty hunters.

Like security work in general, standards are low and training is almost nonexistent.
 

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As with the rest of the general population, police officers rarely have occasion to come in contact with the well trained, professional bounty hunters. To us, the majority are cowboys who are too quick on the trigger (one local bounty hunter shot his partner in the back in a gunfight with a suspect they found hidden in a closet), morons (another local bounty hunter apprehended a suspect at a drive through window, only to find out later it was the wrong guy. It might have been an understandable mistake, except the guy he "apprehended" looked NOTHING like the suspect he was after. The bounty hunter was arrested for assault & false imprisonment among other things), or drug dealers (I personally know of several local bounty hunters who provide their informants with illegal drugs for information).

Since these are the ones we come in contact with, we tend to stereotype. Right or wrong, that's human nature.
 

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Here in AZ, three "Bounty Hunters" broke into a house and killed one of the occupants. Turns out there was no warrent or bond jump, it was a pure rip off for money and they picked the wrong house with two innocent folks in it. The "Bounty Hunters" all got arrested, and are all in prision until the sun stops shining.
This has not exactly polished the image of ""Bond Enforcement Agents" in this state.
 

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Cant really say I understand why, since most states license bail enforcement people, they arent required to have training at the police academy in use of force and other skills of a police nature. Especially in light of (and I dont know how this varies by jurisdiction) their ability to enter residences and detain people.
 

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This entire ""industry"" is based on a late 1800's court decision about bail bonders ability to enter residences to recover the jumper. There is no law beyond that case, other than what the states enact.
 

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Sleuth said:
This entire ""industry"" is based on a late 1800's court decision about bail bonders ability to enter residences to recover the jumper. There is no law beyond that case, other than what the states enact.
I think they are required to be licensed in my state. If so they should require a certain level of training in exchange for licensing.
 

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I work in the Executive Protection field for a large Corp. and I would like to think that we have way more training then most bond agents at least the people that I work with do. I would say that 99% of us have lengthy backgrounds in law enforcement but regardless of our background we have all had to attend various schools and training facilities that prepare us for what we might encounter while working Executive Protection. Therefore I think we (EP's) should be excluded from being in the same category and bail bond agents.
 

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rayjay, nothing personal but just as there are well qualified, professional bail enforcers, I have met "Executive Protection" folks whose qualifications consist of their ability to B*S* their employers.

Of course, there are unprofessional FBI agents (quite a few, really), and VERY professional local cops. Everybody gets to prove their worth every day.
 

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I will usually not make blanket statements or express absolute opinions about anything. One of the benefits of experience is that after you learn that you don’t have all the answers you learn that you don’t understand all the questions. The one topic that “trips my trigger” is the subject of bounty hunters, rent a cops, and bodyguards. I suppose there are those employed in these fields that rise to some level of competence, but I will not, nor permit anyone assigned to my unit, work with these folks. I will state categorically that during my law enforcement career the great majority of LEOs that it has been my privilege to work with are bright, intelligent, honest, well-trained professionals doing an increasingly difficult job everyday. I will also state that I have met more than a few jerks, morons, and idiots LEOs than I care to remember and the only thing worse than these clowns are the commanders and supervisors that permit them to function as LEOs. My experiences may be an aberration, but I believe what separates the law enforcement officers at the federal, state, county, and municipal level from the private sector is the intense background and selection, high quality training, and accountability required of members of my profession. If you add to this formula the demanding continual training and additional standards mandated by state P.O.S.T. boards that require a degree of proficiency and integrity demanded of few, if any other profession, your begin to realize my position. My profession is an equal opportunity employer. If you can meet the high stands we demand, successfully complete the initial training you get to wear a badge and carry a gun. If you run afoul of internal affairs, the P.O.S.T. board, or the courts you are unemployed and looking for a new career. I personally know of several LEOs that had to find new careers because of infractions they committed that in other occupations would be considered a non-event. If my people screw up and have a problem serving an arrest or search warrant the solution to the problem is actually quite simple; they pickup their Motorola radio or cell phone, contact the dispatcher and wait for sixteen of their best friends to arrive on the scene. Our Tactical Operations Unit (our problem solvers) has never failed to remedy the situation. They may employ a variety of solutions, but they always solve the problem.
 

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rayjay said:
I work in the Executive Protection field for a large Corp. and I would like to think that we have way more training then most bond agents at least the people that I work with do. I would say that 99% of us have lengthy backgrounds in law enforcement but regardless of our background we have all had to attend various schools and training facilities that prepare us for what we might encounter while working Executive Protection. Therefore I think we (EP's) should be excluded from being in the same category and bail bond agents.
Im certainly not equating the qualifications (I have formal EP training, LEO experience, and I also work in the EP field.)The EP guys I know are mostly top-notch guys. My point was that the public has a lot of misconceptions about both lines of work, and unfortunately there are those bozos who live up to the stereotype and reinforce those perceptions. The public only sees or hears about the high-profile screw ups.:hrm:
 

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FraudCop said:
... I believe what separates the law enforcement officers at the federal, state, county, and municipal level from the private sector is the intense background and selection, high quality training, and accountability required of members of my profession...
Let's not forget that on the PROFESSIONAL end of the private sector (Corporate EP, Risk Management Consulting, Litigation Support) the MAJORITY of consultants are either former LEO's or former Special Ops. I was an FTO, Detective, Sgt, and Watch Commander on a 2500 officer dept. My business partners, as well as most of my friends and associates are ex or retired LEO's. That said, I have to sadly admit that some of the biggest morons Ive ever met were also cops.:hrm:
 

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Everybody makes error-some do not always do things correctly. I am not a leo--but i got dents in my door and a shotgun in my face one night late because the 6/8 guys did not read north when they should have been on south.
I forgave and forgot-but what if!
now you guys got a tough row to hoe, an i know it, an i appreciate you--but, well, er---ya'll gotta be more pefect than that.
blessings
 
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