1911Forum banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i wasn't sure where to post this, but i figure i will get more answers on this one..

i have never seen a stock colt with a full length guide rod. personally i don't care for them. but so many other makers seem to think that they have to be there.
the colts i have and the ones i have messed with never seemed to need them.

i know that they are supposed to help hold the spring, but where is it going to go?? i have neveer seen a spring kink inside of a 1911 that didn't have it.

as i said before i don't have them or care for them, i strip my colt by taking out the slide lock and then sliding the slide off of the frame, like other guns. and the full length guide rod makes this a pain

any insightfull input would be great.

thanx,
russel the cop

------------------
CHANCE FAVORS THE PREPARED MIND....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
I use the full length guide rod because I use a lighter spring and a shock buff to shoot light loads for plates...also makes the action seem smoother (at least for me).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
I have an XSE Govt. model that came with a full-length guide rod.
About a year ago on Shooterstalk.com there was quite a debate about the need for a FLGR. A test in some gun magazine showed a FLGR in one full-sized 1911 gave something like a .25" better group at 25 yards. In the end the consensus was it isn't needed.
The idea of a FLGR, I guess, is to give the recoil spring a smoother surface to compress and release on, and not run the risk of "kinking" or whatever. Someone noted that between the end of a govt. model recoil spring plug, and the tip of the guide rod, there is something like 1/4 inch of free space --certainly not enough to kink up a wayward spring.
But some custom gunsmiths like them (Ed Brown, for instance), and when I had my Series 70 Combat Commander customized the gunsmith more or less insisted on it. More profit for him? I don't know.
The FLGR works well in both my Colts, and contrary to popular belief, you don't need a bushing wrench to remove the barrel. I just use the rounded tip at the base of my stock Colt magazines to depress the recoil spring guide.
Best, ACP
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
685 Posts
I got a FLGR late last year and recently removed it. I didn't notice any real improvement in the operation of my pistol, but it did create (for me) a hassle in removing the slide for cleaning. I have a fitted barrel bushing and the GR prevented me from pulling the slide back far enough to release the tension of the bushing on the barrel. For a while I just took the slide off the frame and left the barrel in place but I wasn't comfortable with that so I went back to the old guide rod and plug.

My $.02

------------------
Steve "El Roto" G.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I may be showing my ignorance here, but I remove the slide before I remove the spring, so a full length guide rod makes this much less exciting. I don't have to handle a squirming spring, then go chasing my spring and stubby guide rod after I've removed the slide. Then I use the bushing wrench to remove the bushing and guide rod guide plug. After that it's just like anybody else when I clean the pistol. I simply reverse the process to reassemble. The only reason I can think of that I do it this way is that I exchange .45ACP top ends and .22LR conversions while at the range, so it's just simpler to leave the guide rod and recoil spring with the slide.

Tom
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top