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I'm giving my new Sig P365 a workout along with a Zacchaeus holster. Instead of standing and shooting El Presidente or similar drills I decided to try something different. I had taken a lawn chair to the range to offer relief from the Sciatica in my hips and decided to shoot from sitting. Shooting is done from a seated position beginning with weapon secured in your normal carry holster. Standard IDPA target is used. From a seated position perform a failure drill. Begin at 5 yards move back to 7 and 10. I bring a blue plastic tarp with me to the range and spread it on the ground to make collection of brass easier. Drill #2 same target but now lay on your side or back as you would in bed. I used my range bag as my "night stand" and place the loaded weapon on the bag. At the start acquire the weapon and shoot from lying on my side with the target to your side , I hope that is clear. These were scenarios from my IDPA days and adapted for practice/ Share any creative drills you might have. I'm always looking for new ways to get in some solid practice
 

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I think that any form of practice will benefit you. Additionally that changing it up will help you even more. Rarely are deadly encounters rehearsed. I keep a juice can full of pebbles sitting on a fence post on my driveway. Sometimes when I drive in I make a point to either stop and shoot from the window of the truck or car. Having of course anticipated doing this and putting in hearing protection. And sometimes I will jump out of the vehicle and engage the target from a couple of stances, to include the weak hand.
With rifles I like to shoot standing quite a bit. Sometimes kneeling to get a better shot verses just shooting off of a bench. I rarely do prone as the bugs and ticks get to be bothersome. But even dry firing can be of great help, especially for hand guns.
 

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It certainly helps to have a range or your own place where you can do these kinds of drills. Public ranges may be convenient, but they nearly always force you to shoot from a static position (like standing) and engage the target with slow fire only. If you're able to find a place outdoors where you have the range to yourself be sure to think safety first and foremost. Putting a bullet in yourself with nobody else around to help apply first aid would really, really suck.

Here is one idea that you may not have thought of: Firing BB or Airsoft guns indoors at prepared targets and backstops, even from your own bed! SIG does offer a BB gun version of the P365, so for weapons manipulation and simulation drills you might have a great solution there. Practice draws and shooting from odd positions all you want, with just the risk of a broken window or pelted family cat.
 
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I spend most of my time at the benches at 25 yards. If a pistol won't shoot that far I get rid of it. I'll shoot some standing, some from a rest, and some one handed. Don't really like walking back and forth too much. I might go up and practice doubletaps a bit at 10 yards putting the first shot on the head and keeping the second center mass but I'm not really into the fast tactical stuff. Best drill would be drink two bangs, chain-smoke, and stay up all night before shooting. If you can get tight groups while exhausted with your hands shaking a mile a minute then a little fear and adrenaline is gonna be no problem if someone kicks your door in at 3am.
I've put enough rounds through my sks that more training won't help. I can hit a man every time at 200 yards shooting pretty quick and reload faster than the average ar-15 user. That's about all my rifle and eyes are good for.
Not a big fan of current shotguns. I'll grab one when they make a rimless shell that you can fit a respectable amount into a stick mag but I'm not running1800's rimmed shells from an 1800's tube magazine. Might take another 100 years but I'll wait.
 

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Whenever I get up to my brothers place in the boondocks I work on various scenarios where I must encounter a BG while pulling up to a stop in the car. He built a backstop behind an old junker car where you can place objects representing various encounters one might find in a real world application.
After he and I practiced a few what-ifs I realized I needed a holster that I could draw from while seated if trapped in a car with no possibility of exit. All make believe but realistic in its application.
Ended up with two different holsters that would be a better solution than normal carry.
Shooting from a seated position in a car offers a new challenge I like to practice in this remote location. Realigned my entire strategy involving car encounters that may be real world in today’s environment.
614405



And this:
614404
 

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I am not in a business of telling people what to do and I don't want to come across as paternalistic. Take this as a public service announcement.
Zach is an appendix position holster.
Overwhelming majority of fatal NDs with AIWB that I know of happened during manipulation in sitting position.
I've done countless classes and matches with AIWB, no problems, but you can't pay me enough to work with a loaded gun in that position. Sitting position + AIWB = dry fire only, or live fire but without the draw. YMMV.
 

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I use all sorts of techniques in training gathered over years of learning from very good instructors and range officers. I continue to work on those today, but from a civilian's perspective. I agree with USMM Guy that working with movement is key to understanding the real world and how your strategy might change based on the situation. I will offer one point of advise when working with vehicles and movement: DON'T SHOOT YOUR OWN MIRROR!

Also, if you're so inclined, practice transition drills between handgun and long gun. Not only moving individually, but getting back to the truck and making the platform transition to either stay in the fight, or work your way out of it.
 
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