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“.45 delivers an abundance of stopping power. JMB created the sidearm in .45 because the .38 cal had lost a lot of soldiers because it lacked the stopping power the army needed against well-armored attackers. The .45 ACP is a slow-moving but heavy round that is well-known for its stopping power. Tested in countless wars, Americans have an inherent trust in the cartridge. The 45 still punches a larger hole in a target. Inherently a subsonic cartridge, it funtions well out of nearly every barrel length. The 1911 used by Gen. John Pershing’s expeditionary force in Mexico in 1916, and the .45 was already a legend by the time it saw service in World War I.

The 1911 was ideally suited for trench warfare. Instead of trying to load six bullets into six different chambers in a revolver during a milling trench fight, a doughboy had only to slam a single magazine into his automatic to be ready for action. The .45 quickly became known as “the gun that halts the Hun.”

You may have heard “The 9mm will kill the body, the .45 will kill the soul.” It was stated that way because the .45 hits so hard. The big fat .45 230 gr. JHP round does a lot of damage, it dumps its energy into its target and usually doesn’t over penetrate. Unless of course you are using Buffalo Bore, which is known for producing some of the most powerful ammunition on the market. The 255-grain hardcast load is very powerful and sends a bullet at 1,000 fps from a 5-inch barrel. Penetration in gel is dramatic, with bullets commonly passing completely through 36 inches of bare gelatin. This particular load is as powerful as the original black powder .45 Colt loads for the 7½-inch Single Action Army … which is saying something!

Americans truly trust the .45 ACP and the 1911 platform, even if ballistics science says there are better options. A 1911 in .45 ACP is culture. Cartridges such as the .40 S&W and 10mm Auto were supposed to do away with .45 ACP. They didn’t.

It’s difficult to find a .45 ACP cartridge that doesn’t function well. There isn’t a large degree of difference in performance from barrels between 3 and 6 inches, considering that there isn’t a large disparity in velocity between those barrel lengths. Jacketed hollow-points and other expanding ammunition will typically work just as well in a compact .45 or a full-sized pistol. Many types of 9mm ammunition aren’t geared toward low velocity. Sometimes, there are significant performance gaps between compact carry guns and full-sized duty guns.

It’s impossible to have a discussion about the .45 ACP without looking at the 1911 pistol. The two are forever linked. There have, of course, been other calibers of 1911 made, although none ever achieved the popularity in the 1911 platform as the .45 ACP has but the 1911 in 9mm is gaining by attracting a lot of shooters for the obvious reasons.

The 1911 is an old, outdated and overcomplicated “dinosaur” that can be fickle as far as ammo goes. It needs tuning, hand-fitting of parts as benign as safeties and sights, and it can be picky with magazines. The descriptor, “drop-in,” has a completely different meaning with the 1911 than it does with Glock pistols and AR rifles. The idea that you’d have to file something is foreign to many modern gun builders. To work on a 1911 is to have deep knowledge of everything from staking sights to hand-filing slide rails. You also need the right tools.

Despite all that, it’s still the single greatest handgun ever designed. It has its flaws, but there’s a big difference between a well-built 1911 and everything else out there. You feel a sense of confidence when you put your hand on one: The 1911 and the .45 ACP get the job done.
Today’s 1911 pistols are typically quite good from the factory. Most are ready to run, right out of the box, and they don’t need much tuning. Unlike many modern guns, 1911s are, by nature, tight fitting and sometimes require a few hundred rounds to get them going. The .45 ACP is an American staple. So is the 1911. And they aren’t going anywhere.”
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I do not feel that the 1911 or the .45acp are going to disappear any time soon. My main reason for this is that there are still many designs of both firearms and cartridges that are out dated but they are still around and popular.

There are companies that the majority of their offerings are reproductions of out dated firearms. There is still interest in flintlock firearms both for shooting and hunting. There are a few small ammunition companies that offer loadings for cartridges that use to be defunct or reloader only.

The trends today have made the 1911 and the .45acp “obsolete” for the modern trendy crowd but they are not going away. Think about all the people back in the 19teens carrying SAA Colts and other revolvers. Here comes this new fangled pistol from Colt, gun writers singing it’s praises and how it is the best pistol,,,yada, yada, yada.

People nowadays want magazine capacity, small size, and low weight because self defense carry is very popular and getting more so every day. So that is what the gun manufacturers are going to concentrate their efforts on. When the trends change so will the firearms that are manufactured.


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I have several 1911's of different manufacture, I have Sig's in 9,40, and 45. I have S&W shields, both Gen 1 and Plus. I have carried everything when I was an LEO from a 44 mag, 41 mag, Bren 10, Delta Elite 10mm, Beretta 92SB 9mm. CZ75 9mm As a civilian I have carried them all and right now my go to is the Plus. Of all the shooting I have done in my lifetime it feels the best as far as fit and pointability. Will I get rid of my 1911's, dought it. But the wonder 9's are here to stay when I can pack 14 +P hollowpoints in a compact shootable handgun. As far as the 1911 and the 45 disappearing, it will always be around until all of us old farts are dead and then our wives will sell them to somebody for we told her we paid for them.
 

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I believe if the younger shooters/gun owners were given opportunity to learn, handle, and shoot the .45 it would help the 1911 keep on keeping on. There has been and is a trend toward perceived lower recoil in long arms and handguns. The 6.5 creedmore is touted for it's low recoil and most of my 25–35-year-old expanded family members have them. The 9mm has been superbly marketed and again, all of that age group have a 9. If they could only be taught about the 1911 and shoot it. My son-n-law had all 9's til he became my son-n-law. I let him shoot my 1911's. He now has 2 1911's and loves them. He's not planning on getting that .44 mag though, even though he shot it.
 

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The way I see it, 1911 was designed around and for the 45 ACP. Heavy bullet manstopper,it does that extremely well. Its heavy some say ugly, heavy recoil, hard to conceal, difficult to operate. As long as there are 1911s, I will use 45ACP what the future "people" use is irrelevant what is now is what is important to me, all the arguments about all the different calibers and plastic fantastic are just circular logic and doesn't work anymore than religious arguments. My opinion I own it you can't handle it tough toenails.
 

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all of mine are .45acp all are hammer fire which is what I prefer. I did have a Sig P365XL and it was nice but it was 9mm. one of my tools is a FN FNX-45 Tactical and what I love about it is the 15 rd magazine of 45 acp. with 3 magazines full that almost a box of 45's
 

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It seems like .45 ACP is rapidly declining as a caliber. In the last two years, according to atf reports, only around 12% of firearms produced were in calibers larger than 9mm and up to .50 cal. This is a considerable downward trend, considering that around 5-10 years ago, the percentage was around 40%. Granted, the .40 SW enthusiasm seems to be fading as well.

What is everyone’s prediction on the future of the 1911? Will 45 be a thing of the past, being replaced by 9mm and 10mm? Is enthusiasm only among older folks (I happen to be young, so I hope this isn’t the case...)?
I’d be interested to see what everyone predicts as far as future trends go.
The 1911 has been’dying’ for over 100 years. Yet- they are still being made. The fat and slow .45ACP still gets the job done inexpensively.
 

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Look at the demographics of the larger number of new shooters - they want personal protection, and they have been convinced that the 9mm is the way to go.
 

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I'd comment, it depends. There is a future with the 1911. Like myself, I started with polymer and graduated to the 1911 in 45 acp which I compete with. A percent of new owners will graduate to the 1911 in 45acp and/or 9mm. It will come down to how much you want it and money. I have a 1911 micro in 9mm that I carry. However, I would carry one in 45 acp if it wasn't so heavy(have a steel commander) and I lost 20 lbs. However, all my 1911 in 45 acp always work and 230 grain ball is plenty stopping power where a hollow point may not be necessary. My 1911 micro 9mm, on occasion, chokes on a hollow point which is what I carry with for stopping power. My micro 9mm needs more attention with thorough cleaning the areas that make contact with the bullet which is not ideal.. I wouldn't want to be on the news laying on the ground with a FTF! Oh!! Forget to mention all my 1911s are accurate! My perfection polymers are accurate enough
 

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Colt Ser 70, Colt M1911A1, Remington Rand M1911A1, Browning 1911-22, Springfield 1911 RO Compact
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The .45ACP and the M1911 pistols aren't going anywhere. They're lower in % of sales mainly because of the cost of the pistol and the cost of .45 ammunition. And many newer shooters are afraid of its reputation of having a high recoil, so they go for a 9mm. I have a copuple 9mms, an M9 and an SA 1911. I might get another, but even a 9mm 1911 is pricey compared to the plastiguns. And the Ammo - until last week I couldn't find any decently priced .45ACP. I had been using up what I bought years ago.
 
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Ruger, Colt and Les Baer 1911s. Various Glocks, no-hole S&Ws, Rugers, Mausers, some AR.
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If the statistics are "down to 12% for calibers greater than 9mm up to .50", then the demise of the .40 probably makes up most of that decline. It may actually be the .45 went up in popularity, but you'd have to see the sales number by specific caliber to know for sure.
 

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It seems like .45 ACP is rapidly declining as a caliber. In the last two years, according to atf reports, only around 12% of firearms produced were in calibers larger than 9mm and up to .50 cal. This is a considerable downward trend, considering that around 5-10 years ago, the percentage was around 40%. Granted, the .40 SW enthusiasm seems to be fading as well.

What is everyone’s prediction on the future of the 1911? Will 45 be a thing of the past, being replaced by 9mm and 10mm? Is enthusiasm only among older folks (I happen to be young, so I hope this isn’t the case...)?
I’d be interested to see what everyone predicts as far as future trends go.
 

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I don't care what calibers people are choosing. They all work. Whether it's a 22LR, a 38 Spl, a 9mm, a 45 ACP, or a 44 Mag, etc. They all work at stopping the bad guy, fun to plink with, and most of them are good for hunting. I've hunted hogs and deer with 45 ACP, 357 Mag, and 44 Spl from ground blinds. All DRT. Dead Right There. And that means they're good against bad guys.
 

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Somehow I just don’t think that either the 1911 or the .45 ACP is any more than the cycle of all things firearms over the past several decades. Ammo shortages have seen the ups an downs in this become fairly steep in the last year and a half.
The 1911 will always be available as will the .45 ACP and/or it’s components. Lot of .40SW
(The 10mm Short by another name) still out there in this world and I don’t think their collecting dust if my last range visit is any predictor.
9mm was, Is, and will always be a popular caliber and platform. New bullet designs, better powder and primers breathed new life into this Round and continue to do so, be that at a slower pace from previous years.
It’s gonna be what it’s gonna be.
However, the 1911 and the .45ACP ??? I don’t think anything can put a stake in those hearts!
 
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