1911Forum banner
1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I guess I just generally accepted you "get what you pay for" -- that is, the more spend, the "better" overall gun you get.

Lots of people have been commenting to the contrary though. Saying all you get when you spend more is a more expensive gun. Not a "better" one.

What's your take? Is an $800 gun generally better than a $400 gun?

At what point to you cross over from "junk" to "good" to "fine"?

$200 / $500 / $1000?

I have a $400 S/A Mil-Spec .38 Super and I suspect I'd have to spend $800-$1000 on a new gun to get a noticable improvement. Although that example might be more of "diminishing returns".

Thoughts?

Mike
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
20,434 Posts
People move "up" all the time, but you seldom see a Brown/Wilson/Baer shooter shopping for Springfields. After you experience quality, it's hard to go back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
569 Posts
I feel it's like buying a car. In general, you might get what you pay for, but...I've had $30K cars that fell apart quickly, while I had an old $6K used pickup that was running fine with 200K miles on it.

I have a $350 Griffon 1911 that has never misfed and is just as accurate as any I've seen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,391 Posts
I generally agree that you get what you pay for but 1911s are kinda like binoculars in this way. If you score a pistol by points when you are going from the most inexpensive to a midpriced gun let's say that you are paying $10 per point. As you move up the scale the points become more and more expensive for that incremental increase in quality.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
What's your take? Is an $800 gun generally better than a $400 gun?
Yes, generally better, but not necessarily 2 times better.

I would never spend $1500 on a single 1911, I would rather buy 2 $750 pieces but I would not want 5 $300 pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
garymac said:
Yes, generally better, but not necessarily 2 times better.

I would never spend $1500 on a single 1911, I would rather buy 2 $750 pieces but I would not want 5 $300 pieces.
Yeah. I've managed to spend $3500 on 7 pistols over the last 18 months or so. That averages out to about $500/each.

If I had it to do over again, I'd probably spread that same $3500 out over 4 pistols instead.

I keep looking at 9mm STI's -- especially the Rangemaster, but it's hard to imagine it is really $1300 / 3x better than my Hi-Power.

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
483 Posts
The question is best answered like this:

It's exponential.

In plain english: The difference between a $300 gun and a $1000 gun can be huge, but the difference between a $1000 gun and one for $1700 is not as large.

A good example is the old 350 cid Chevy truck engine of the late 70's. For $300 most can be made to run 300 hp. To get to 400 hp you are looking at several thousand.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,692 Posts
I agree with most of the posts so far. And to take it further, the difference between a $1700 gun and $2500 is almost completely cosmetic.
That is $800 worth of good looks. That could buy a weekend of very fine company or a new Dillon 650.
If a $1200 used Baer or Wilson with low mileage runs 100% and is typically accurate as those two pistols usually are, the only thing you can gain by spending another grand is better looks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BillD said:
If a $1200 used Baer or Wilson with low mileage runs 100% and is typically accurate as those two pistols usually are, the only thing you can gain by spending another grand is better looks.
Hmm, maybe I should take another look at that used Baer over at SS&S....

:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,692 Posts
I had a friend looking for a used Baer and I found him one on the net. I think he paid $1200 for a TRS with less than 400 rounds through it. That is what a member of our little group would do the first weekend. Barely broken in and save $500 off the new price. The used deals are out there, kind of like the truth.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
177 Posts
It depends on what is important to you. After owning a Wilson and a C&S customized Kimber, I won't go back to shooting or carrying a stock 1911. I remember when I first took my Wilson out of the box. I racked the slide, clicked the safety on and off and thought to myself why did I spend this much money! Next to my then stock Kimber stainless, it did not seem like such a big change. Then I took it to the range. With the first round I was hooked. The trigger breaks like a glass rod. Superbly accurate. The checkering makes sure that the gun stays put. It is subtle, but to me its worth the cost. Does anyone need a shooter like this? Let alone one that cost several times as much? Well, I guess that depends upon how you define need. Or, perhaps, lets throw "need" out the window and just admit that we WANT it!

BriGuy says "get what makes YOU happy!" To hell with justifying it. Er, unless your spouse takes issue with it. Then we are back to "need" again....:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,207 Posts
Funny how people will spend $3K total on various similar cheap guns, but find spending the same total money on a couple of higher-end models extravagant. The total bucks are the same one way or the other. My suggestion would be to get the best quality you can, within whatever your gun budget is. Maybe that means 1 CZ-75B instead of a couple of HiPoints, or 2 $1,500 guns instead of 6 $500 guns.

Basically, the performance improvements are like horsepower improvements... small improvements at the high end get pricey. Going from 3" @ 25 to 1.5" @ 25 might cost you a bit, but isn't crazy. Going to 1" @ 25 will set you back more. Sub-1" @ 25 will be expensive. Going from a reliable 4.5 pound trigger to a reliable 3.5 pound trigger might double the cost of the trigger job. And the totally performance-irrelevant stuff like adding checkering and serrations to dang near every surface adds extra hundreds of dollars FAST. Uber-pretty cosmetics add hundreds of dollars as well.

So I guess the bottom line to all this is that people should shoot what they want and mind their own business. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,108 Posts
When you become a spoiled brat custom lover like myself, you start to find the difference lies less and less in tangible performance and more and more in pride and personal performance. The former is that you start to notice things like TINY maching operations done just because it makes for a smoother appearance, or how straight that checkering is, or that trigger feels a little bit smoother. The latter is you end up shooting better not because the gun is better but because the gun gives you more confidence.
Some people enjoy the differences enough, despite the fact that they're minutiae, that they're worth the money. Other people just don't care. Neither side is right or wrong. As long as you feel you have the right gun for you, and its performance satisfies you, you have the right gun. 1911 lovers are generally hot rodders though, which means what satisfies you today may not tomorrow... and THAT, my friends, is where the customs really come from!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
I've found the law of diminishing return holds for every hobby I've ever had...I used to do triathlons, an $800 bicycle is exponentially better than a $400 one, but a $1600 bike is definitely NOT 2x better than the 8...

Also in every hobby there are those for whom "Its all about the gear." - they get as big a charge out of collecting high-zoot equipment as they do competing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,889 Posts
In a nutshell...

The difference between a $1200 pistol and a $2200 pistol, is all in the details.

I am anal enough to notice the details and like things built my way.

Thats the reason why I have a bunch of STI's and Caspians in the safe and dont mind the extra $$$.
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top