1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 55 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've watched this video maybe half a dozen times, or more, but there is one thing I never picked up on until the other day. It comes 5:10 into the video:
I have been doing the exact opposite of what Sgt. Sanderson says to do. I practice, and practice, and practice, with holding drills, and now dry-fire drills, and then I try to put what I've learned to use at the range. To me, the indoor stuff is "just" practice, so I can do better when it counts. Wrong.

  • When dry-firing, be very critical of yourself until everything is perfect.
  • When you get to the range perform as best you can (without being critical of what you're doing). "Perform as best as you can without being judgmental of yourself".

As he then explains, most people want to be extremely critical "when it counts", but they think that's when they're live firing. "When it counts" is really when they are dry firing.

In short, dry firing is the foundation on which everything else is based.... and that for every shot you fire at the range, you should fire 100 shots dry-fire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
I started shooting a few years ago by taking a safety class and then a NRA Basic Pistol class. The NRA class was private instruction with a very experienced and talented teacher.

Every shot was analyzed. "Why did that shot go there?" "What does that shot tell you?" Every shot had a value.

Getting started like that really put me on the path towards precision shooting. He also advocated lots of dryfire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,127 Posts
Dry firing is a waste of time. "Air" guitar won't make you a better guitarist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,388 Posts
Boge:

Dry firing is a waste of time. "Air" guitar won't make you a better guitarist

Then don't take a guitar to a gun fight!

But then what do I know I can't play the guitar!

All the fundamentals must be at their peak before "dry fire" practice can be considered "the foundation"!

All the best,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,438 Posts
Dry fire puts unnecessary wear and tear on firearms over the long run and it's aid in training is debatable.

If I want to slow things down and focus on the fundamentals I use precision airguns. The spring powered types are more challenging to shoot than cartridge firearms but just as rewarding when you get things right.

To each their own, but I don't like shooting blanks...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,395 Posts
Dry firing is a waste of time. "Air" guitar won't make you a better guitarist.
couldn't agree more. A BB gun would be great, 'dry fire' you just assume your'e doing something right really having no clue if you're hitting minute of barn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,276 Posts
Dry fire.....

Dry fire practice is good for people that want to improve their precision shooting......that is firing an accurate shot at any given distance. Any person that can not maintain proper sight alignment before, during, and after the shot should consider "dry fire" practice.

Practicing at 10 yds. with an accurate .177 pellet pistol is also a great way to practice, since the slower velocity of the pellet down the bore makes it very important to have proper follow through on the shot. Once your brain ingrains the idea of keeping the sights maintained in proper alignment, you will continue to do so when shooting rapidly......

I use to practice using an accurate air pistol in my backyard, and added weights to my wrist to increase my ability to hold the gun steady......it was very helpful, and significantly reduced my wobble area when holding the gun, which also increased my accuracy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
205 Posts
Dry firing with a lazer can be very enlightening. Especially for new shooters, but often for experienced as well. Its a credible way to practice.

I used to spend hours playing a guitar with my bandana wrapped around the strings, while others in the room did there thing (undisturbed). This, also, was a very credible way to practice.

It is very rarely correct to say that something is always wrong. Though there are such times. For instance, it is always wrong to shoot a person.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
146 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
I wonder how many people here actually watched Keith Sanderson's video (linked to in the original post)? For that matter, how many people tried actually following his instructions, of "holding drills", and only after that following his advice on "dry firing"? ......and for every "live shot" fired, shooting 100 "dry-fire" shots? People who don't actually follow the instructions shouldn't be too surprised when they don't get the claimed benefits.

With lots of free time, and nothing to lose, (and a lot of curiosity), I tried doing exactly what Keith said, holding drills, eventually followed by hours of dry-firing, twice a day every day minimum, and it made more of a difference (for me) than all the other practice/training/advice/books/forums I've read or seen or been told about put together. (It also reinforced what many people say about "learning the fundamentals".

...........and I'll have to admit that all that stuff, including firing at a blank wall, with no target, sounded pretty stupid to me at first, until I first found out why to do it, and especially when it all started to make a difference.


I think most people think that dry-firing is simply picking up their empty gun while watching television, and pulling the trigger a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Everything does not work the same for everyone. You can take some of his suggestions on how "HE" trained himself to become the #1 shooter in the world, and apply them to your training regime. There has to be some merit to his tactics, as it has worked in his favor over and over and over again, as he talks about why he does it, and makes sure that he does the same thing over and over and over again.

I have found myself doing this myself when going to the range, and it has helped me tremendously on my shot placement and accuracy. This is the first time I've ever watched any of his videos, and I am happy to see that what I am thinking is not too far out of line, of what the TRUE professionals of shooting are doing.


Shoot more....Stress less
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
323 Posts
If you dryfire as suggested by Keith Sanderson, Bill Blankenship and others you should be tired afterwards from the effort, otherwise you are not training properly. Even when I was working with a coach for air pistol competition I was told to dry fire, with the premise that live fire is the validation of your dry fire training, the target is just a recording device. Also, the coaches I've had would get angry if my range time was spent working on something I could have solved at home.

Here is a link to Allen Fulford discussing training: www.bullseyepistol.com/fulford.htm#practice

Sanderson can shoot 1911s pretty well, not just 22s: www.thegunmag.com/sanderson-zins-franks-finish-1-2-3-at-camp-perry-pistol-championships/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,588 Posts
Mike,

Thanks for the link and the timely reminder of the value of Dry Fire practice.

I am a Dry Fire believer. With a Laser sight it will help you identify and eliminate any bad trigger control problems you may have. Or just use a dime balanced on the muzzle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,173 Posts
Good video. Initially I sort of went "hmmmm" to the blank wall but I see the wisdom after trying it. I also love shooting air hand guns in the house and on the back patio, but do use accurate ones. But the same thing does not work for everyone. I have friends that blow off reloading your own ammo as a waste of time since they have the money to buy new ammo. Other friends that run a silhouette target out to 15 yards and are real happy if most the holes are inside the silhouette someplace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,395 Posts
you need basic famiarity with a weapon by all means dry fire. Otherwise practice driving by sitting on a chair making vroom noises as you turn an imaginary wheel. Surprisingly all the time I spent doing that as a kid didn't translate to real cars
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,059 Posts
couldn't agree more. A BB gun would be great, 'dry fire' you just assume your'e doing something right really having no clue if you're hitting minute of barn.
I sometimes practice with a BB gun. My targets are ping pong balls; scattered about or shot aloft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Dry-firing has nothing to do with learning to shoot A gun accurately. It has everything to do with learning to shoot a specific gun with greater trigger control/consistency. Shooting my BB gun doesn't help me work on the DA pull of my carry gun. However, practicing pulling that trigger with little-to-no movement of the barrel pays off in spades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,217 Posts
I
  • When dry-firing, be very critical of yourself until everything is perfect.
  • When you get to the range perform as best you can (without being critical of what you're doing). "Perform as best as you can without being judgmental of yourself".

.
On the second point, it should be noted that you should challenge yourself hard enough to fail. Try something new, try more speed, more range, more point shooting, more moving targets.

You can learn much from a miss, if you know how to learn. Many shooters in my area are afraid of being seen, missing a target. And they often only train at practical 21' ranges. That's nonsense. Only failure increases our skills. You have to let go of your ego, and push your limits to failure. It's ok to set up a hard course of fire, and completely fail to clear it. Try again next week.
 
1 - 20 of 55 Posts
Top