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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I did some velocity testing on the Remington 185 grain Golden Sabers, GS45APA. Firearm tested in is a Springfield Armory Compact w/ 4" barrel. Chronograph tested with is an Oehler 35 with three sensors spaced 1 foot apart. Temp aprox. 60 degrees @ 2500 feet above sea level. First sensor about 3 feet from muzzle.

Shot: 7
High: 972 fps
Low: 929 fps
Extreme Spread: 43 fps
Average: 953 fps
Standard Deviation: 14

When I get the opportunity I'll dissasemble some rounds and report powder, bullet, and case weights.
 

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I chrono'd Golden Sabre 185 grain +P loads with my Pact Professional but I set the screens out about 10 feet to avoid confusing the sky screens with ionized gases. The pistol was my usual carry piece, a Para C7.45 LDA with 3.5 inch barrel.

Velocities went from 1036 to 1053 but the average was close enough to 1050 that I usually quote that figure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Nemesis: One of the things I like about using three sensors/screens is that the chronograph is capable of detecting and flagging erroneous readings by comparing the results between the three sensors. This helps to ensure that muzzle blast is not causing any bogus readings that might otherwise be calculated in. :cool:

For high-power rifles I've found it is much more important to have the first sensor about 10 feet off the muzzle in order to prevent muzzle blast gasses from hitting the sensor before the bullet does.
 

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Just one thing. Differences in altitude make a marked difference in velocities. A round shot at an elevation of 2500ft will run much faster than a round fired at 800ft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Gargoyle, Thanks for pointing that out as others may not be aware of this. I'm aware of this and that is why I posted the elevation--in addition to the ambient air temperature.

However, this mostly affects downrange performance. And given that handguns are used at relatively short ranges its effects can probably be ignored.

Temperature can play a more critical role depending upon how temperature sensitve the powder is. Some powders don't work worth beans below freezing while others work well a low temps but can be over-pressure at higher temperatures. Primers can also be a problem and become very erratic resulting in large velocity spreads.
 

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FWIW I tested GS45APC (the 185 +P) at almost 3000 feet elevation, 58 degrees and got an average of 1119 fps. Only had a few rounds but they were quite consistent.
 
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