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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to decide on wood grip panels for my Heinie in process. First thought was Cocobolo, but that seems very common for a Heinie. I like darker, rich-looking grips with lots of grain. But there are so many different wood types. Any suggestions for my future beauty? If you have any picture posts to show, I'm sure others would be interested in the various wood grips available out there.

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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I prefer Hogue's profile and pattern. Ahrends is too "fat" for my taste, plus I don't care for the thumb dimple (although he'll omit it if you ask). Other makers do well but I've settled on Hogue's geometry.

Cocobolo really ranges in it's grain/coloration so don't give up on it just yet. I'm not too fond of the more common bright, almost gaudy orange with black grain. I prefer the more rare walnut-like brown and black. I have a pair on a Vickers gun that is the brown/black that is really beautiful - subtle but rich grain. I don't think the average guy would know it was Cocobolo. Have an Ed Brown with grips like that too. Rosewood (the old Honduran variety) can also be richly figured without being overbearing. Much modern "rosewood" is not the Honduran variety.

You might want to consider bocote (Zebrawood). It can range greatly in color, from mostly light with dark stripes, to a darker background with the black stripes. The darker variety might work well for you. If you prefer checkered grips, the high contrast of the zebrawood's grain can punch through the texture of the checkering. Again, I have a set from Vickers that is really unique. Larry hand selects his wood and has Hogue cut it for him. They kind of look like a more contrasty version of the brown/black cocobolo described above.

Marbled ebony has a unique look. Not for me but it can be quite striking.

Kingwood, Olivewood, and Tulipwood can be quite beautiful - and something really different - but are probably too light for your stated taste. Saw a blued Burns gun with Olivewood here locally and it was striking without being overly contrasty. Tulipwood is a bit flat for my taste. IMO there's nothing like a set of Spegel Kingwoods on a blued High Power - oooooh. Not sure I'd do Kingwood on a 1911 - would probably look good on a blued one.

At any rate, grips are highly personal. Find the right piece of wood and go from there. I once had Jason at Ahrends e-mail me photos of the wood he had in stock and selected the particular portion of the particular board that I wanted. Took us two tries to get it right, but we did. Maybe Hogue would do the same for you? I'll be Heinie does like Larry Vickers and has his own personal stash of wood from which to make your grips. Talk it over with him.

Jim

[This message has been edited by JiminCA (edited 10-01-2001).]
 

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I decided on curly koa. Stuff only grows in Hawaii. Koa comes in a wide range of shades and the "curly" variety has a lot of figure.



-Steven

[This message has been edited by swong13 (edited 10-02-2001).]
 

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I was considering a pair of Marbled Ebony stocks for my project. Does any one have any pictures? (S&A were the only 1911 pictures I could find, and not quite thrilling.)
 

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I have used, kingwood, tulipwood, bocote, walnut, cocobolo, and marbled ebony. Since you have not said what the finish will be, I can only tell you how they worked for me. All my guns are stainless. I have found that the darker stocks work better for me.

The tulipwood, from Hogue, were not to my taste. I prefer that the stocks mirror each other. The Hogue's did not. One side looked ok, the other did not. And I really did not care for the yellow with red grain on the stainless pistol. Probably looks good on blue though.

The kingwood is from Wilson Combat, nice rich reddish brown with dark grain. The bocote is probably the nicest stocks I have. They came from S&A. They are lighter with a very pronounced grain. JiminCA descibes them well. The marbled ebony, also from S&A, is black with light chocolate colored marbleing. Very nice. The walnut is light brown with dark brown grain. Walnut seems to look best when the stocks are uncheckered, same for the marbled ebony. The kingwood and bocote are checkered and the grain shows through quite well.

Cocobolo and rosewood everybody seems to have. I have seen cocobolo range from a plain dark red to some really nice orange and red with dark grain structure. Picked up another pair of cocobolo today from Son, will see how they look.

Nice thing about putting new stocks on a custom 1911, it like getting a new gun, well almost.

(one of these days, I am going to learn how to type!!!)

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John

"And by the way, Mr. Speaker, The Second Amendment is not for killing ducks and leaving Huey and Dewey and Louie without an aunt and uncle. It is for hunting politicians like (in) Grozney and in 1776, when they take your independence away".
Robert K. Dornen, U.S. Congressman. 1995

[This message has been edited by John Forsyth (edited 10-02-2001).]

[This message has been edited by John Forsyth (edited 10-02-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
John--Good info, thanks. Do you have any pics you can post of the stocks you're referring to? My custom will be blued. Any preferences on smooth, rangered or checkered grips?

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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These are custom Hogue stocks. Don't ask me what kind of wood because they belonged to Arnt from Dillon Precision. One of his guns came into Pete Sing'e's shop with these stocks on em. Once I saw the pretty grains, I had to have em. Now they're mine




[This message has been edited by ArmySon (edited 10-02-2001).]
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Unusual grain, Son. Very nice stocks. Sometimes it's just the right moment, the stars are in the right position, and a pair of beautiful stocks just appear where you happen to be...

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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Son has a good eye for stocks, just picked up a pair of smooth cocobolo from him. They should look very nice on my stainless Kimber.

On a blued gun, from Heinie, I would only have ivory on it.

I never bothered to give photopoint the 12 bucks, so they are still holding my pics hostage.

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John

"And by the way, Mr. Speaker, The Second Amendment is not for killing ducks and leaving Huey and Dewey and Louie without an aunt and uncle. It is for hunting politicians like (in) Grozney and in 1776, when they take your independence away".
Robert K. Dornen, U.S. Congressman. 1995
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I've never been one for ivory stocks on dark guns. What kind of ivory would you do, John? Anyone else have opinions on ivories? Sources?

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
How do you think the Heinie would look with custom ivory scrimshaw stocks? If I were to go all out, I may recreate the artwork from an original UK first edition Ian Fleming James Bond cover. Or would that be too much for a blued Heinie? I don't want it to look like a "pimp gun", so to speak. It has to have a classy look. But I suddenly thought the connection with a first edition Bond novel jacket cover might be an interesting approach.

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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Paladin, According to the Wilson Combat catalog, Kingwood are their best selling grips. Hope this helps. Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
That's where I think ivory would look very classy.

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 

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I have had ivory grips on both stainless as well as blued guns. My preference would go to the blued version every time (very classy look).

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Interesting, I would have thought just the opposite as I mentioned. I've always thought stainless, lighter-colored guns looked better with the lighter ivory. Makes it a more subtle, blended look. The blued guns make the ivory stand out much more.

Just a matter of taste, I guess.

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"If a nation expects to be ignorant and free in a state of civilization, it expects what never was and never will be." --Thomas Jefferson to Charles Yancey, 1816.
 
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