1911Forum banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hope that one day I can achieve the ragged holes at 20yds+ that so many forum members achieve on a regular basis, but for now, I am happy to be center of mass!

I shot this 25 shot group at 20 yards with my Officer 9mm yesterday. While I was pleased with the way I shot, I wanted to get some pointers on ways to improve and tighten it at longer distances.

My rear site is drifted slightly to the right, and it really shows in this group, as I rarely shoot to the right. I going to get it centered next time at the range and make sure that it is sited in correctly.

Practice makes perfect, so before I shoot more ammo, any pointers on accuracy at longer distances would be greatly appreciated, and tips for an Officer, if any different, would be a plus.


 

·
Banned
Joined
·
14,948 Posts
1) Dry fire
2) Consistency of grip/hold
3) Dry fire
4) Breath control
5) Dry fire
6) Get good groups first at 10 yds.
7) Dry fire
8) Get good groups first at 15 yds.
9) Dry fire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,604 Posts
1) Dry fire
2) Consistency of grip/hold
3) Dry fire
4) Breath control
5) Dry fire
6) Get good groups first at 10 yds.
7) Dry fire
8) Get good groups first at 15 yds.
9) Dry fire
May I also add DRY FIRE? <gg> Don't try to get accuracy at longer distances until you can tighten up your group at about 10-15 yards. If you can't do that, you are wasting your time at longer distance. If you have access to some GOOD instruction, avail yourself of it. It will save you a lot of aggravation.
Happy Thanksgiving, Merry Christmas, and Happy New Year
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,564 Posts
1) Dry fire
2) Consistency of grip/hold
3) Dry fire
4) Breath control
5) Dry fire
6) Get good groups first at 10 yds.
7) Dry fire
8) Get good groups first at 15 yds.
9) Dry fire
Add "front sight" to this and you're good to go. If you want to shoot at stuff 100 yds away, it's all about trigger control and what the front sight is sitting on.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Add "front sight" to this and you're good to go. If you want to shoot at stuff 100 yds away, it's all about trigger control and what the front sight is sitting on.
I will admit, my dry fire exercises have decreased over time, and this is proof that I need to reinstate them.

As far as front site work, how to I include this in dry fire? What are some drills to do in your house where space/distance is limited? I have about 20' of clear open space.

What can you do to include breathing control? Any tricks?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,996 Posts
I agree with all of the above. Keep in mind you are limited by the accuracy of the gun as well as your eyesight. I am more accurate after I smooth and lighten the trigger pull on my guns. I am more accurate with a 1911 than a plastic gun. I check the gun with a 1 inch spot on the target at @ 15 yards. Also I do better some days than others. maybe an age thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Get yourself a quality 22lr. target pistol and get good with that first, and make sure you get a pistol with at least a 5- 7 inch barrel.

The ruger mark 3 target is a real good choice or even a browning 22lr camper target etc.

Don't get a 1911 22lr for practice it is a bad choice and not the accurate as a dedicated 22lr target pistol.

Also depending on the make of your 9mm officers pistol , they are not really that accurate of 1911 pistols to begin with and even some full size 1911's.

I had 2 Springfield 1911's one a gi mil spec and the other an old SA NA marked 1911, both of these guns you couldn't hit a 24" x 24" target at 15 yrds. With my SW 38 snub and my kimber gold match would shoot easily 3-4" groups off hand the same day at 20 yrds.

So a lot of the time its the gun and not the shooter.

Once I installed a kart match barrel into the mil spec SA it would easily shoot a 2" group at 25 yrds. from a rest.

Also had a cheap $300 Norinco 1911 that was fitted so good from the factory it shoots on par with my 70 colt gold cup, so there are a lot of variations in accuracy and fit of a lot of the 1911's out there.

So you really need to verify if its you or the gun , another easy way to try it would be to rent a good 22lr target pistol at a range see how good you are .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,227 Posts
I take several guns to the range. On days I do not do well I come home and practice with an air gun. If I do bad with that it often it means I am coming down with a cold or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Get yourself a quality 22lr. target pistol and get good with that first, and make sure you get a pistol with at least a 5- 7 inch barrel.

The ruger mark 3 target is a real good choice or even a browning 22lr camper target etc.

Don't get a 1911 22lr for practice it is a bad choice and not the accurate as a dedicated 22lr target pistol.

Also depending on the make of your 9mm officers pistol , they are not really that accurate of 1911 pistols to begin with and even some full size 1911's.

I had 2 Springfield 1911's one a gi mil spec and the other an old SA NA marked 1911, both of these guns you couldn't hit a 24" x 24" target at 15 yrds. With my SW 38 snub and may kimber gold match would shoot easily 3-4" groups off hand the same day at 20 yrds.

So a lot of the time its the gun and not the shooter.

Once I installed a kart match barrel into the mil spec SA it would easily shoot a 2" group at 25 yrds. from a rest.
I have Mark III Hunter, and am pretty darn accurate with it. How should I include that in my rotation when I am shooting with the my 45 Gov't and 9mm Officer?

Here is my Caspian 9mm Officer

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
802 Posts
Age and eye sight have a lot to do with it, you may need to use a laser or red dot , unless you have perfect vision.

As you age even with corrective lens, you can not have sights and the target in focus at the same time, with iron sights.

The officer is actually a difficult pistol to control at long ranges, even if it is accurate, due to its short grip and small sight radius and shorter barrel.

Even the choice of 22lr pistol and trigger will have a big effect on accuracy, with my SW 41 22lr or older Hi Standard Supermatic will shoot 2" all day from a rest at 25yrds , while the ruger mark 2 I had bone stock it was hard to get under 3" groups at 25yrds. until I had a gun smith tune the trigger to get as close to match trigger as possible.

Once the ruger mark 2 had a good trigger pull the groups dropped down the about 2.25" at 25 yrds. from a rest.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
13,944 Posts
How long have you been shooting? How often do you shoot? Are you willing to get the knowledge you need to be a great marksmen by watching vids and reading books? Have you read any or watched any yet yet?

Once you answer these questions we can take it to the next step.

But it comes down to obtain the knowledge, practice, and correct mind set.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
74,047 Posts
Remember that as the range increases small errors in your sight alignment and trigger control become magnified. You have to get good at shorter ranges first, then as you improve you'll see the results at longer ranges. This is a target I shot a couple of weeks ago. 21 rounds at 15 yards slow fire. As good as this may seem, at 25 yards my targets go back to looking like hits at long range with buckshot. Why? Because by that range my ability to align the sights with the bullseye becomes too difficult. At 15 I can still see the target well so I have a decent aiming point.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have been working back for about 6 months now. I decided on Sunday to take a crack at 20 yards because I felt that I was not wasting ammo as I had before.

I will admit, with my eyesight, 20 yards is a whole more difficult than 15 yards. Guess I will continue the practice at 15 yards until I get more proficient, and then start creeping back to 20 yards and see what happens.

I only have a couple of thousand rounds under my belt, and shooting is something that I see as an added benefit to owning these beautiful guns. When I started six months ago, my target at 7 yards looked like my current target at 20 yards, so hopefully with more practice I can tighten it further.

Thanks again for all of the tips.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,395 Posts
I completely disagree with dry fire. I hate it. There's something going on there, hard to know without watching, but those with a bad habit will simply commit that habit to muscle memory as well as put it in your brain that your doing well when you have no clue where that round would go.

I know people preach dry dry fire but I've always seen those who try and improve through it reinforce the bad habits. Now if your happy it'll reinforce those skills.

I would think you'd need to shoot closer until you get it down pat and hen move back. If your mucking your trigger or letting your sights dip its going to be amplified the further you go

I'd like to give one of those laser targets a shot myself

Edit: I know I'm going against popular consensus but I don't care. Popular consensus was that the universe revolved around the earth which was flat and you shot a handgun one handed
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,321 Posts
First things first. SHOOT LESS ROUNDS PER STRING. (Sorry for yelling, I just wanted to put emphasis on how important this is)

How can you gauge your performance when you have 20+ holes in the target?
Shoot 3 to 5 rounds per string so you can actually see where each round went. This will tell you if you are jerking the trigger or pushing the gun.

The biggest mistake I see most people make is that people are so eager to see where the bullet hit that they don't practice follow through. They get off their sights before the bullet leaves the barrel it seems. :)

Front sight, front sight, front sight. Very important. Your eye likes to center things by itself. If you focus on your front sight, your eye will help you line up the rear. Sight picture is everything. Front sight in focus, rear sight and target slightly blurry, the tops of the sights need to be level and you need equal space between the rear blade and the front blade. Don't ever use dots to aim when target shooting. That isn't what they are made for. Some people will tell you they've been doing it for 20 years. Anybody who has been doing something wrong for 20 years will never learn the right way.

Don't anticipate recoil. Let it happen. Press the trigger slow and even until the shot breaks and surprises you.

The fundamentals work. You just have to practice them.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
13,564 Posts
I completely disagree with dry fire. I hate it. There's something going on there, hard to know without watching, but those with a bad habit will simply commit that habit to muscle memory as well as put it in your brain that your doing well when you have no clue where that round would go.

I know people preach dry dry fire but I've always seen those who try and improve through it reinforce the bad habits. Now if your happy it'll reinforce those skills.

I would think you'd need to shoot closer until you get it down pat and hen move back. If your mucking your trigger or letting your sights dip its going to be amplified the further you go

I'd like to give one of those laser targets a shot myself
If one just mindlessly sits in front of the Idiot Box while pulling the trigger with no regard to how the front sight responds ...then yeah...you'll just reinforce a bad habit. But that's not what dry fire practice is or how it's properly performed.

Dry fire practice becomes valuable when you perform it correctly...i.e.....as you pull trigger straight back....notice what the front sight does. Does it dip down??? Jerk up??? Pull left or push right???? Watch what the front sight does and adjust the trigger pull accordingly. Feel the trigger reset. Know when it happens or is about to happen. When the front sight sits dead still on target as the hammer drops....rinse and repeat. You can also work on holster work, presentation skills etc....

It's worthwhile if you know what you're doing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I shoot 3 round strings usually. In this case, I shot three, brought it back, saw where they hit and sent it back out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,455 Posts
Precision Pistol

There is plenty of good advice in the previous posts.

I must comment that there are a number of 1911 conversions that a very capable of chewing the "X" out of the target at 50 yards!

Most importantly, you appear to be getting good combat accuracy with a dedicated combat handgun.

To get the kind of accuracy you are asking for you will need a dedicated precision handgun and be willing to pay for lessons from an instructor carrying at least an Expert rating in a precision handgun discipline.

I could have you circling the "X" fairly quickly with one of my PPC revolvers at first to develope trigger discipline and sight alignment. Once you gained a little confidence with the revolver we would move on to the .22 semi-auto and then on to the centerfire precision pistol.

It's all about learning the basics correctly and applying the basics consistantly and of course practice, practice, practice!

John, retired LEO, POST certified firearms instructor, PPC and SuperSeniorSingleStackShootist
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
There is plenty of good advice in the previous posts.

I must comment that there are a number of 1911 conversions that a very capable of chewing the "X" out of the target at 50 yards!

Most importantly, you appear to be getting good combat accuracy with a dedicated combat handgun.

To get the kind of accuracy you are asking for you will need a dedicated precision handgun and be willing to pay for lessons from an instructor carrying at least an Expert rating in a precision handgun discipline.

I could have you circling the "X" fairly quickly with one of my PPC revolvers at first to develope trigger discipline and sight alignment. Once you gained a little confidence with the revolver we would move on to the .22 semi-auto and then on to the centerfire precision pistol.

It's all about learning the basics correctly and applying the basics consistantly and of course practice, practice, practice!

John, retired LEO, POST certified firearms instructor, PPC and SuperSeniorSingleStackShootist
I am going to start shooting my MK III much more from now on, and work on sight alignment, as well as breathing and taking my time on the slow shooting.

I hope my Ed Brown counts as a precision handgun! I will look into getting some lessons from an instructor with an expert discipline.

Thanks again for all of the tips and encouragement
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top