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Hello, I've been reloading for about 3 years now so I have a little experience under my belt. My question is I spilled about 1/2 ounce of (Hogdon BLC (2) ball powder) on my clean wooden work bench that is painted and yes the pairepaint is dry. So I scooped it up and put back in container to use again save a dollar or two. Would the oils in my hands contaminate the gunpowder or should I thrown gunpowder away. Thanks
 

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I don't think so. Unless you had just changed oil on your car and hadn't cleaned your hands, you should be ok.

Bruce
 

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Probably not a problem, but here's a more full discussion...

Oil on your skin is a non-issue. Any other dirt, dust or other contaminants on the bench top or in the brush may or may not make a small difference, depending upon the mass of the contaminants.

Next time, scoop up the spilled powder, examine it carefully, save it separately, and use it in a practice load or two, rather than introduce it to the clean virgin powder in the canister. Keep the clean powder in the canister virgin and perfect. Don't introduce unknowns.

Or just discard it. After 30 more years of reloading, you will realize that losing two or three dollars worth of components each year is absolutely nothing compared to 'taking a chance that nothing will go wrong'. Eliminate unknowns and be happy.


But in this case it's probably not a problem if you kept it all clean and perfect.
 

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Probably not a problem, but here's a more full discussion...

Oil on your skin is a non-issue. Any other dirt, dust or other contaminants on the bench top or in the brush may or may not make a small difference, depending upon the mass of the contaminants.
Contaminants...they apply when casting too and can have disastrous results in a pot of molten lead!
 

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wouldn't it be like the three second rule when you drop food? IF you pick it up and eat it within three seconds, your OK? I don't see a problem with it as long as the counter top was clean to begin with.
 

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I believe that you are GTG with the spilled powder. We all make human errors from time to time......at least those of us that are human!! :)
 

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Agree with most here and in fact I have done it myself. If you dropped it in your child's sand box - it's gone, retrieve it off your bench, not an issue.
 

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Probably not a problem, but here's a more full discussion...

Oil on your skin is a non-issue. Any other dirt, dust or other contaminants on the bench top or in the brush may or may not make a small difference, depending upon the mass of the contaminants.

Next time, scoop up the spilled powder, examine it carefully, save it separately, and use it in a practice load or two, rather than introduce it to the clean virgin powder in the canister. Keep the clean powder in the canister virgin and perfect. Don't introduce unknowns.

Or just discard it. After 30 more years of reloading, you will realize that losing two or three dollars worth of components each year is absolutely nothing compared to 'taking a chance that nothing will go wrong'. Eliminate unknowns and be happy.


But in this case it's probably not a problem if you kept it all clean and perfect.
This !!!!^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
Best/picker
 

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Depending on how much powder was spilled, how much was still in the container and how much, if any, contaminates were picked up with the powder, the contaminates will be "diluted" to the point of becoming a non issue. If you plan on keeping the "contaminated mixture" for 40 years it could develop into a problem.

As stated above, it's the best practice to dispose of any spilled powder just on principal. Best practice is the way we should go, but I for one have occasionally not followed the best practice rule.

If your bench was reasonably clean (no gross contaminates), and the powder container held several time more powder than you recovered, and you use it reasonably soon (this year), you will be all right.

Just my opinion,
Grumpy
 

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My rule is if it falls on the bench it goes in the flower bed.
 
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