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Mr.Angry,
Pete pretty much hit on the nose. About the only thing that I can add is from the perspective of a part-timer. I come from a similar employment background as you, although mine is as a construction equipment mechanic that migrated into management.
Pistolsmithing is certainly a skill that you can learn. If you have experience doing woodworking or any craft type endevour that required you to work with straight lines and curved surfaces, you'll have learned things that will help you with some of the hand work, like blending a beavertail. Get a couple of books and video tapes and a project gun. Start with jobs that don't require a ton of tooling (like a beavertail installation) and see how your skills and temper
fit with working on pistols.
I do this part-time, probably 20 hours a week, max. Pistolsmithing pretty much pays for my shooting habit and helps with putting two kids through college. I love the work, but am good enough with a calculator to realize that I can't replace my income from my day job, by pistolsmithing. Hope this helps.
Good Luck!
John Harrison
 

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I took one of Jack's 1911 accurizing classes this past summer and found it to be most informative. What I learned that was of most value to me, were techniques that have enabled me to increase the consistency of my accuracy jobs by minimizing the hand fitting to areas where it is really needed.
Check the NRA's web site to see what classes are available to you in your area. There are classes taught at Lassen Community College in Susanville, CA. that should be convenient to you. To get the most out of them, I recommend some experience with the particular gun that will be covered and an open mind.
I'm like catbird, I got started because I couldn't afford to have Wilson, Plaxco or Heinie build me a gun. I don't advertise either, prefering to keep a customer base that I can look "eyeball to eyeball". If you do good work, part-time, you will have all the work that you want, without advertising. I suggest developing a specialty for making a profit, because like Pete said, the trigger jobs on the SKS's and other odd/ unique jobs will kill you

John Harrison

[This message has been edited by Precision Gunworks (edited 11-09-2001).]
 
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