1911Forum banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
990 Posts
Hi Mr.Angry,
I think I'm qualified to speak for a few gunsmiths out there, as I did custom work for many and got to know them pretty well through the years. These are all good smiths and do fine work.

I know only one that's pretty well off but the bulk of the his money is made in parts. If you come up with some nice parts, get someone else to manufacture them and collect the money to supplement your income you can do OK , sounds easy but its not, I always keep in mind no ones going to pay for doing nothing, gotta always be producing.

Most guys get by Ok and very few are driving new pick-ups. Problem is fine gun work involves a lot of hand work and is very time consuming, pretty soon your find there is not enough hour in a day. There will be long learning curves and you will have to pay for your mistakes and other peoples too. Done right your have more work than you can handle and people will seek you out, but again, in this business you are kind of limited on what you can charge, you can't charge a guy 400 bux for a trigger job you spent 10 hours on.

I try to limit my business to flat out machine work to eliminate the hand work but that isn't that great either.

Bottom line is you could find a little nitch in the market and do very well. If gunsmithing is what you want to do, go for it, you may not be driving the latest model truck but you'll be happy.

My 2 cents, there are a few good smiths here on the Forum that will be glad to help you out. Pete

------------------
Metal Smith

The only thing I know for sure is what I can measure!
NRA Life Member

[This message has been edited by Metal Smith (edited 11-08-2001).]
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
990 Posts
Hi Mr. Angry,

Let me suggest starting this out as a hobby first, get your tools and pay for your learning curve, find a little niche in the market that you’re good at and go from there. I think you will find when you branch out to things you’re not familiar with, things other than you specialize in, it turns out to be a NO money maker, but that’s your learning curve and that’s how you get experience.

To answer your question: yes, a person with good mechanical ability can figure this stuff out on his own. Just remember that guns are made on a machine and they are mechanical, study it long enough and you’re figure it out. When you get your milling machine remember any shape cutter you can grind or buy and put in the spindle you can cut.

I’m a prime example of a smith that has had very little formal training. This is one reason why I don’t refer to myself as a Pistolsmith, because I don’t think fair to those that had formal training. I do various types of machine work here and don’t follow most of the tradition method of smithing, so calling me a metal smith is about the safest.

I bought a Kuhnhausen shop manual when first started out and soon found out it was not much good to me, but that’s just me, I’m sure there are more good books & videos out there that will help you along the way. Jack Weigand just came out with a video on barrel fitting. There are a few smith offering courses which can cat-a-polt you into pistolsmithing. At times I wish I had formal training because I did my share of struggling. I personal know Jack and his machining ablity, I would go for his course first.
Hope this helps out, Pete Single

Mr.Angry, while I was typing this post I see you got a bunch of replys, told ya there's a bunch of good guys here to help you!

------------------
Metal Smith

The only thing I know for sure is what I can measure!
NRA Life Member
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top