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Discussion Starter #1
This only seems to happen when I'm releasing the slide hard onto an empty chamber, like during a clearing drill or from the slide stop (I don't do it often!). It hasn't happened when firing, but can that be far behind?

Could my 'smith's trigger job have hastened this, might it just be time to replace those original parts, or is it my fault for releasing the slide like that? If it's the latter, some alternative procedures would be welcome.

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Steve "El Roto" G.
 

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Focus a verry critical eye on your sear/hammer notch relationship. Without looking at it its hard to tell, but it does sound as if the angles have changed, either due to a dremel session or the parts have worn in that way for whatever reason. You are correct to be suspicious of this condition.
 

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hay roto....i just recently added a match grade aluminum trigger to my .45 by kings. the sear and dissconector and hammer relationship has to be in proper alinement, specialty trigger jobs for raceguns or very light trigger pules, defence/carry and causual target shooting is about 4pound pull. anyway to test any trigger job is to: take the mag out...make sure its unloaded, than pull your slide back and let it fall...itleast three times....dont pull your trigger while doing this ok, your hammer SHOULD NOT FALL/FOLLOW THE SLIDE. IF it does you have not goting a proper trigger job. and its unsafe and could cause damage to your internal parts in the frame. eather the parts arent properly installed or there out of spec. your gunsmith should have giving your 45 these simple test befor returning it to you.another thing after having a new trigger job of any kind on live firing for the first time"...you should load a dummy round than a live round. after these things i just mention to you, IF it pass all these little test? than you can rest assure that you have a proper & safe trigger job.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I got Frankenpistol repaired yesterday. The culprit turned out to be <drum roll>...

Trigger rebound!

The last trigger job had lightened the spring tension enough to allow the (relatively) heavy steel trigger to bounce back.

A wonderful pistolsmith by the name of S.T. "Buddy" Chapman (Lone Oak, TX) replaced my original trigger with an aluminum version (including overtravel stop) and detailed the various connect points while I watched. Once he had things where he wanted them, he gave me a detailed explanation of what did what when and why. I'm ashamed of how little I knew about my pistol up 'till now. With this newly-acquired knowledge, I'm merely chagrined.


Oh, the new trigger feels great. It shoots so smoothly it's all I can do not to rush out right now and run 100 rounds through it.

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Steve "El Roto" G.
 
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