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Well like the title states...today when I was loading my ccw to head out the door with the wife and son. I drop a round in my pistol with the slide locked back before inserting my mag, which I do every day for the past 6 years I've owned this pistol...and Pop!!!! Scared my wife and my son who were both in the living room with me. I am glad I always have the pistol pointed in a safe direction (the floor away from anyone's direction) or in today's case the couch, but what shocked me was that it happened when I literally load it that way every day for years and it's never happened before.

So after we ran errands and got back to the house I pulled it apart to inspect the seer, disconnector, and hammer for any worn or rounded edges. Didn't see anything wrong with them but paid extra attention when I reassembled it to make sure the seer and disconnector didn't get knocked out of wack or anything. Put in a snap cap like I would a regular round like I normally load it and dropped the slide and no hammer follow and I attempted it about ten times with the snap cap to make sure and it's not doing it now...
Has anyone else had this happen? Also, could it be more than just what I inspected today? I don't drop my slide onto an empty chamber, but I am wondering if I may be missing something that one of y'all may have experienced or have more knowledge about hammer follow that triggers a N.D. than I do?

P.S. My wife wasn't to pleased I put a hole in her couch LOL! Also glad my neighbors are cool around my house and asked if we were alright instead of calling the cops...they know I reload so they figured I accidentally detonated a case while on the press

Just want some input on a possible cause besides what I previously mentioned I haven't had to diagnose hammer follow and this was definitely my first experience with it discharging from hammer follow as well. I'd appreciate it greatly especially if I need to look elsewhere for a possible problem too...
 

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Not sure if this is the cause, but you really shouldn’t just drop a round in the chamber. You should be inserting the magazine, chamber the round, and then top off the magazine if you want the extra round. Perhaps dropping the slide on the chambered round so many times over the years has degraded the mechanisms. That’s a different force than your gun was designed for.
 

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I agree with @Guyfromohio I've never heard of anyone loading a gun like that.

Are you absolutely sure you were not near the trigger and the force of the slide dropping didn't create an AD?
 

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I don't know? I don't see anything wrong with just dropping a round in the chamber, that's why they say 8+1 right. Nothing more brutal than a slide stripping a round out of a magazine and slamming it into a chamber. Did you get a chance to look at the spent casing. One off chance it may have been a protruding primer, one that wasn't seated all the way into the casing. Now I don't reload, but I read in the post that you do, just saying.
 

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I don't know? I don't see anything wrong with just dropping a round in the chamber, that's why they say 8+1 right. Nothing more brutal than a slide stripping a round out of a magazine and slamming it into a chamber. Did you get a chance to look at the spent casing. One off chance it may have been a protruding primer, one that wasn't seated all the way into the casing. Now I don't reload, but I read in the post that you do, just saying.
Dropping the slide on a chambered round causes the extractor to have to snap over the rim of the case. This is instead of having the rim slide up under the extractor claw as part of the feeding process. It can damage the extractor claw and cause you to lose tension prematurely.

Go here Safety Checking a 1911. And do all of these tests for safety function first to help diagnose you issue OP.

Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk
 

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I think maybe a basic NRA safety course would be a good idea for you. There’s a right way and a wrong way to handle pistols and it sounds like you could use some instruction. Not trying to be mean, just a friendly suggestion.

Your method of loading is causing great strain on your extractor every time you load like that. The extractor should be able to snap over the case rim in the event that the round gets ahead of the extractor during the loading cycle but to do it every day is asking for a broken extractor.

Now the negligent discharge could have been a result of the slide slowing down when snapping over the case and the firing pin inertia kept going forward and struck the primer. It’s possible. Maybe not probable

Without seeing your pistol and being able to check for defective parts this is only a guess.
Please seek out some training though.
 

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My guess is that your sear is a bit worn, or the hammer hooks are a bit worn or your sear spring tension is off a bit. It might have been on the ragged edge. The half cock notch may be damaged as the half cock safety should have caught it. Should be easy to fix. Glad no one was hurt. Operator error can happen too. The gun should be fixed. No suggestions on the couch.
 

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Ah the good old blame the gun for the ND

Finger around the trigger, it would and should have fallen to half cock otherwise, aside from you loading your pistol wrong to begin with. Too, the more you load and unload your piece the more chance that you'll have a problem, no rhyme or reason to load/unload every day. The more you finger bang that pistol every day is going to lead to some problem down the road, like this one.
 

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Sorry you shot your couch, but glad no one is hurt. Honestly assess the process as much as the fire control parts to figure out the best way forward. Perhaps minimize the frequency of unloading - loading as a first step.

I appreciate the guts it took to admit what happened, here on this forum. It opens you up to judgement, but it can also help all of us to possibly avoid a similar situation.
 

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You are asking a lot of the built in safety features of the 1911 design by letting the extractor snap over a chambered round. The slide uses a lot of its energy to strip a round from the magazine, and escort the bullet to the chamber. All of the (normal) slide slowing/ bleed off of energy is being defeated by your method. Not good for the gun, health, or couch.

All of us make mistakes. Most people (but not all) who claim that they have never had a negligent discharge are lying. I do appreciate your candor.
 

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I drop a round in my pistol with the slide locked back before inserting my mag, which I do every day for the past 6 years I've owned this pistol...and Pop!!!!
I'm surprised it took this long for something to go wrong. Always load a 1911 from the magazine... that is how it is designed to load. When the slide catches a round from the mag and feeds it into the chamber in a CONTROLLED manner the slide decelerates and the impact (going into battery) is cushioned.

As mentioned, there could be a couple things wrong with your gun- not the least of which may be a damaged extractor from being forced to snap over cartridge rims repeatedly.

My advice would be to have the gun checked out by a competent Smith and a change in loading procedures. Or perhaps a quick access safe so you don't have to load and unload daily.
 

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I think maybe a basic NRA safety course would be a good idea for you. There’s a right way and a wrong way to handle pistols and it sounds like you could use some instruction. Not trying to be mean, just a friendly suggestion.

Your method of loading is causing great strain on your extractor every time you load like that. The extractor should be able to snap over the case rim in the event that the round gets ahead of the extractor during the loading cycle but to do it every day is asking for a broken extractor.

Now the negligent discharge could have been a result of the slide slowing down when snapping over the case and the firing pin inertia kept going forward and struck the primer. It’s possible. Maybe not probable

Without seeing your pistol and being able to check for defective parts this is only a guess.
Please seek out some training though.
What are you talking about? While I don’t load that way, it has NOTHING to do with the discharge. You are 100% WRONG! So when you jump in with the “sounds like you may need some training....” quoting, you had better know what you’re talking about.

The extractor jumping the rim causes wear....it CANNOT be a reason for the discharge. Sounds like YOU may need some Gunsmithing lessons, if you are going to pretend to be one! Just a little “Devils Advocate” ;)

As to the issue, it just happens sometimes. Remember, it’s a mechanical device. And mechanical Devices can fail at times....no matter how many safeties we have. As I said, I don’t agree with loading a round on an empty chamber as habit, but it had nothing to do with the discharge. And you did exactly the right thing. Never chamber pointed at anything important. MOST of all another LIFE! (Though it sounds like the couch may have been a “little” important to your wife...just tell her it’s the PERFECT time for HER to pick a new couch, LOL!)
 

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Just want some input on a possible cause besides what I previously mentioned I haven't had to diagnose hammer follow and this was definitely my first experience with it discharging from hammer follow as well. I'd appreciate it greatly especially if I need to look elsewhere for a possible problem too...
Not to be rude but the problem was clearly identified in the responses being your loading procedure. By now hopefully you've researched it and understand how a 1911 feeds and chambers and adjusted your procedure. A series 80 has a firing pin block (trigger must be pulled to release firing pin) that prevents accidental discharge due to drops and may well have prevented what happened to you. Inertia of the slide falling on a chambered round may have sent the firing pin forward.
Glad no one was hurt.
 

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What are you talking about? While I don’t load that way, it has NOTHING to do with the discharge. You are 100% WRONG! So when you jump in with the “sounds like you may need some training....” quoting, you had better know what you’re talking about.

The extractor jumping the rim causes wear....it CANNOT be a reason for the discharge. Sounds like YOU may need some Gunsmithing lessons, if you are going to pretend to be one! Just a little “Devils Advocate” ;)

As to the issue, it just happens sometimes. Remember, it’s a mechanical device. And mechanical Devices can fail at times....no matter how many safeties we have. As I said, I don’t agree with loading a round on an empty chamber as habit, but it had nothing to do with the discharge. And you did exactly the right thing. Never chamber pointed at anything important. MOST of all another LIFE! (Though it sounds like the couch may have been a “little” important to your wife...just tell her it’s the PERFECT time for HER to pick a new couch, LOL!)
You're way off base on this, agree 100% with EvolutionArmor.
 

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If you can discern no mechanical problems after carefully function checking your pistol and can't duplicate hammer follow; then the problem likely resides in the firing pin spring not being strong enough to prevent inertia firing.

If your pistol is equipped with a firing pin block safety and you've carefully inspected and function checked it (including the block safety) without being able to duplicate the problem, then only two possibilities remain; magic, or your finger was on the trigger resulting in a negligent discharge.
 

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Also one of several reasons I prefer to carry a pistol with a firing pin block. Although I do like Series 70 1911s more. (I don’t carry a 1911 period) But then, even a pistol with an FPB can fail. I’ve seen a block corroded in place, in the “pushed up” condition. Noting the importance of very regular cleaning/maintenance. Even with, it’s important to always remember that these are mechanical devices, made by flawed beings. While certainly not a normal occurrence or even a regular one, any pistol CAN fail any time. Yes, I agree it’s almost always a finger on the trigger which is the cause. ie., “I was just cleaning it and it went off!”...... But every once in awhile there truly is a freak accident.

And NO, I’m NOT speaking from the experience of it happening to me. By God’s Grace, I’ve never had an accidental, unintentional, negligent or otherwise discharge.
 

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What are you talking about? While I don’t load that way, it has NOTHING to do with the discharge. You are 100% WRONG! So when you jump in with the “sounds like you may need some training....” quoting, you had better know what you’re talking about.

The extractor jumping the rim causes wear....it CANNOT be a reason for the discharge. Sounds like YOU may need some Gunsmithing lessons, if you are going to pretend to be one! Just a little “Devils Advocate” ;)

As to the issue, it just happens sometimes. Remember, it’s a mechanical device. And mechanical Devices can fail at times....no matter how many safeties we have. As I said, I don’t agree with loading a round on an empty chamber as habit, but it had nothing to do with the discharge. And you did exactly the right thing. Never chamber pointed at anything important. MOST of all another LIFE! (Though it sounds like the couch may have been a “little” important to your wife...just tell her it’s the PERFECT time for HER to pick a new couch, LOL!)
I don’t take criticism personally. I take it as an opportunity to learn. Since the OP has been doing this for 6 years and thought it was perfectly fine to load a pistol outside of its design, how is suggesting him getting training wrong? What else is he doing that’s dangerous that he hasn’t told us?

And yes, a sudden stopping of the slide can cause the inertia of the firing pin to strike the primer.

Come on over to NH. I’ll gladly teach you the NRA safety course and maybe a thing or 2 about building these things. But leave your attitude at home. Humble students learn better. If our mistakes don’t make us realize that there was a failure in our training, we must know everything and are perfect human beings right?
 
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