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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, I've got a little problem and could use some help. On my last trip home (1st problem - not enough practice time!) the wife and I went to the range for some practice with my Kimber Target. I was trying to do some doubles and strings, and I noticed two things. The first is that my second/third/etc shot would be lower than the first. I use a semi-isoceles, semi-weaver stance, more like Ayoob's 'turret' stance than anything else. I also use a high grip, thumb high on the safety. Heel of support hand positioning didnt seem to make a difference in the shot placement, either way (either placing support hand so left thumb was just below strong hand thumb, or alongside strong hand thumb), the shots were still stringing low, and maybe a bit left, in about a 4" group. Concentration was on the front sight the whole time, unfortunately, I'm not to the point yet where I can 'see' the front sight through the whole recoil stroke.

Second problem was with trigger reset. I found it VERY hard to feel while firing. During dry-fire practice, no problem.

HELP!!!!!


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Mike
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The Guy in Bosnia
 

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I fought the same problem for a while until I decided to do it my way.

Many people will tell you to put your finger on the trigger just behind the center of your fingerprint...about halfway between the center and the first joint.

I have larger than normal hands, and fingers...what I call surgeon's fingers. As a result, my trigger finger doesn't rest against the grip panel if I place my finger on the trigger in the recommended way. I found this to be true for all my guns; not just my pistols, but my rifles as well.

I found that, if I insert my finger into the guard until my trigger finger is resting against the grip panel, the trigger rests against my finger joint.

When I shoot with the recommended finger placement, my hits are to the left of center about 3 to 5 inches. If I shoot with the trigger against my fingerjoint, I hit center.

Some armchair dry firing showed me what I was doing. When I use the recommended hold, my finger pushes the gun to the left slightly as I squeeze. That doesn't happen the other way. When I tried to train myself to do it the "right" way, all I did was shoot more flyers. I also found that my grip on the gun was more tenuous than when my trigger finger is resting against the grip panel. This slight loss of control contributed to my poor performance.

I shoot all my guns "my way" now, and can cap off rounds just as quickly as I could the "right" way. I just needed the practice.

I think that's the key, once you have found the grip that's right for you.

You can't get enough practice.

Hope this helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice, feedramp, I'll have to try that out and see, next time I'm back home. Hopefully it will help with the little bit of LH drift that I get.
However, the downward drift still remains a problem. Any other thoughts or opinions?

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Mike
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That Guy in Bosnia
 

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Hi mnealtx, I am an expert at pulling shots low at times. I go through a drill at about 30 to 50 feet where I get the sights right on target, fire, hold the trigger back until I am back on target and reset the trigger and fire again. The following shot will come quicker when I do it right and slow when I don't. What dumps them low for me is squeezing the strong hand grip while squeezing the trigger, especially the little finger. This will cause the barrel to drop and sure enough the shot is low. I don't shoot thumb high, it just don't feel right no matter how hard I try. I do agree it is a sturdy hold but just don't feel right for me.
 

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Originally posted by mnealtx:
<snip>The first is that my second/third/etc shot would be lower than the first.

Second problem was with trigger reset. I found it VERY hard to feel while firing. During dry-fire practice, no problem.

HELP!!!!!

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Mike
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The Guy in Bosnia

I could not begin to give you definitive coaching without seeing this in person but it does not sound to me like a grip or trigger finger placement problem.

When folks try to speed up they subconciously develop over time a thing called "Post Ignition Push". If you slip a dummy round into Ross Seyfried's or Robbie Lethams.45 you will see his muzzle dip in a rapid string of fire just like an ameture who is doing it for the first time. The difference is that the push from the professional shooter is coming a mili-second *after* the ignition. The less experienced shooter sometimes "anticipates" the shot and this becomes "Pre ignition push" and that is a bad thing, sometimes known as "flinch" or "milking the grip" but not to be confused with being afraid of the noise or recoil it is just trying too hard to make the gun go off with a little extra squeeze from the other fingers of the hand at the time the trigger presses the trigger. The rounds usually go low and left depending on the timing and the degree of the grip.

Guess I made that clear as mud, back to my corner


Jim Higginbotham
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks, Jim...I hadn't thought I was milking the grip, but it's certainly something to check when I'm home next time...

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Mike
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That Guy in Bosnia
 
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