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Handgun round and rifle round

818 Views 9 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  elsworth
What makes the Rifle rounds so much better at stopping someone than a Pistol round lets say a .45 acp Vr. a 223 remington the .45 has a biger slug to take out more flesh right. but the 223 could go right threw the person and not take out very much??
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To see this demonstrated,,,,

If you are out in the country and have a good backstop.

Fill up some milk jugs with water and put the caps on them,,,,shoot it with a 45,,,,and if you have plenty room and access to say a .270,,,,,or anything like that shoot one of them.

The one you hit with the rifle will practically explode.

I loaded up some really hot .300 Win Mag's with various loads using 130 grain bullets up to 180 grain noslers and its impressive.

They don't tend to last long, but shooting bowling pins with a .300 Win Mag is pretty fun too,,,,like I said the pins don't last long though.
 

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Don't know for a fact, haven't done an experiment on it, but have made the calculation back in my days in college (one of my profs was a shooter). Would have to dig it out (may try to) but when a bullet penetrates a membrane (skin, water jug side, etc.) it works a lot like an jet aspirator (i.e., it sucks air in behind it). The amount of air pulled in increases significantly if you maintain at or above sonic velocity after passing through the membrane (the entrance point is now an orifice). If the calculations hold true, you should see some pretty significant stretch cavities off of high velocity rifle rounds.

In other words, what Rosco said.

[This message has been edited by gm45 (edited 09-07-2001).]
 

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Theory is cool,,,,but blowing up milk jugs is fun


Another factor is fragmentation. The .223 is particularly devestating if the velocity is still high at the point of impact. From what little I understand of it, if the velocity is still extremely high and the twist rate is high when the bullet impacts you get the tissue damage Rosco so eloquently mentioned and a fragmenting bullet which does further damage.....generates even more blood loss.

But, that all depends on bullet contruction, velocity, twist rate,,,,,yada,,,yada,,,yada.

A B.S'er I am, a ballistic scientist, I am not, so don't take everything as gospel.
 

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As Rosco says. In addition, velocity needs to be in the 1700 to 1800fps area, however some believe a velocity in the 1400fps area will cause the temporary cavity. GLV
 

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From The Ultimate Sniper by Maj. John Plaster:

Ch.5, p.130-131--

"The other terminal ballistic effect is what happened to those milk jugs, now called 'Temporary Wound Cavity.' The shock wave that accompanies bullets causes a wild but temporary inflation of human tissue, lasting only a split second and having little incapacitating effect if the projectile is a slow moving pistol bullet...

...When it comes to temporary cavitation, the effects supposedly are not as predictable and therefore should not be considered, although it's known that temporary cavitation inflicts injury to nonexpanding tissue such as the liver, brain, and kidneys, as well as liquid-filled organs like the bladder. The least cavitation injury is to tissues that readily stretch, such as the lungs, muscles, skin, and ordinary blood vessels...

...But much of the current ballistic theory is based upon pistol bullets, although rifle bullets usually inflict much more damage and possess five or even ten times the kinetic energy."

Maj. Plaster also discusses in this book the in's and out's of using .223 as opposed to .308. Bottom line: hollow points or fragmentary rounds can cause much more damage than FMJ.

Hope this answered your question somewhat!

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GO ARMY!!!
BEAT NAVY!!!
 

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The .223 is said to be prone to "tumble".

I wonder, when it tumbles, it exposes more of it's side surface area...so, imagine a .223 round flying sideways and hitting you, would it not then strike with the surface area of, perhaps a 9mm?

Maybe this has something to do with its effect?
 
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