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I'd like to have my Para slide hardchromed and I'm concerned about hydrogen embrittlement.

Basically, I'm choosing between two companies -- metaloy or metalife. I spoke with Steve at metaloy who states that hydrogen embrittlement is only a concern if a part is hardchromed several times (like 10x).

Then l call metalife and the lady speaking stated that their prepping process prevents hydrogen embrittlement from occuring, period -- she was emphatic about this.

Now this is the deal, my understanding is that hydrogen embrittlement does occur -- the plater could just minimize it's occurence as much as possible.

Steve was honest about this issue and I appreciate that. Is metalife immune to this process?

I'm basically leaning towards metaloy due to their high quality work from what I read from this forum, but metalife may sound better if their finish is actually superior.

I really appreciate your input! Thanks in advance.
 

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EDC: SIG P938.
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I had my gun plated by Metaloy, about three weeks ago, and when I sent it in, they recommended I not send the following parts: hammer, sear, and extractor. Those are the parts that take much a beating, so maybe hydrogen embrittlement is a concern?
 

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I spoke about this subject with Virgil Tripp of TrippResearch who I think did the best hardchroming regardless of who you compare him to. Here is what Virgil had to say regarding the subject (hopefully Virgil won't mind):

"Hydrogen embrittlement requires steel with a hardness of Rc low 40s and higher combined with extended tank run times of around 30 minutes or more. Frames are typically Rc 28-32 hardness and typical run times are about 7 minutes. Technically, I don't think experience or theory supports the creation of embrittlement with a frame. Single stack frames of various manufacturers crack from time to time at the change in cross section where the dust cover leaves the rails regardless of type of surface finish. "
 
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