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With 45 ACP, I screw the Lee Factory Crimp Die down until I can't finger tighten it anymore. Then I back off the cartridge and tighten the die 3/4 turn, and apply the crimp.

Do you consider that a light, medium, or heavy crimp?
 

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A set of calipers would tell you what you need to know! I would think this is a somewhat "medium" crimp setting.

The lightest crimp that still allows reliable feeding is all you need with .45 ACP.
 

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With 45acp you just want to take the flare out of the case. Calipers and more importantly, how it works in your application is the most important tell-tale.
 

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Doesn't matter how far you screw down the die itself, crimp amount is set using the adjusting screw on top. Screw in (down) for more crimp, and out (up) for less crimp.
 

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Set it up according to the instructions and adjust crimp with the top adjustment knob.

Screw the Lee Carbide Factory Crimp Die in, until it just
touches the shell holder and back out the adjusting screw.
With the loaded round in the die, turn the adjusting screw
in until you can feel it just touch the case mouth. Then
move the cartridge out of the die slightly and screw the
adjusting screw in 1/2 turn for a light crimp and one full
turn for a heavy crimp.


link.
http://leeprecision.com/cgi-data/instruct/Pistol4.pdf
 

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With 45 ACP, I screw the Lee Factory Crimp Die down until I can't finger tighten it anymore. Then I back off the cartridge and tighten the die 3/4 turn, and apply the crimp.

Do you consider that a light, medium, or heavy crimp?
It sounds like a fairly heavy crimp. How much force is required to raise the ram at that setting? It should be very little.

May I suggest that you run a series of plunk tests starting with a no-crimp setting that probably will not plunk and then continually increasing the crimp a little at a time until the rounds do go into and out of the chamber easily. Enough is enough. More crimp is not better.
 

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With 45 ACP, I screw the Lee Factory Crimp Die down until I can't finger tighten it anymore. Then I back off the cartridge and tighten the die 3/4 turn, and apply the crimp.

Do you consider that a light, medium, or heavy crimp?
I don't believe you know what the Lee Factory Crimp Die is. It's not the die that seats and crimps at the same time. If you do know what the Factory Crimp Die is, then you're certainly not reading the instructions that came with the die. ;)
 

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With 45 ACP, I screw the Lee Factory Crimp Die down until I can't finger tighten it anymore. Then I back off the cartridge and tighten the die 3/4 turn, and apply the crimp.

Do you consider that a light, medium, or heavy crimp?
As mentioned, on an auto-loading case like the 45ACP (9MM, 10MM, etc.) when we apply a Taper crimp, the amount is determined (Or more correctly interpreted) by measuring “just” below the case mouth.
Place your calipers between 0.005” – 0.015” below the case mouth

Your 45ACP chamber starts out at around ~ 0.480” or so.
As it nears the headspace ring in the chamber this datum point tapers down to about ~ 0.474”
So to enhance reliable feeding and chambering, the flare must be removed
(The bulk of this is done in the seating die)

As a “general” rule, most taper for a 45ACP is set between ~ 0.468” and ~ 0.472”
Excessive Taper can distort the bullet and have a negative effect on the case tension holding the bullet firmly in the case so you should only apply the amount of crimp needed to produce reliability

Below is an example of a “moderate” crimp applied to a dead nuts 0.470” Taper

In addition to the setting instructions Steve was gracious enough to post, the crimp die is not crucial to have the die body “run down” close to the shellplate like a size die.
In fact, you may find more stable and uniform crimp settings having the crimp die body backed off about ~ a half an inch or so above the shellplate (Depending on caliber being loaded)

With the LFCD set in this manner it allows the adjusting stem to be “threaded” into the die body several turns before you start making your crimp adjustment.
This can result in a more uniform and consistent crimp settings with the adjusting stem more “secure” in the die body.

Good Luck :)
 
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