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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just out of curiosity, why do I see so many people using 18+ pound recoil springs? It seems the 16 pound spring has worked for over 100 years.

:confused:
Nate
 

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Because they didn't have +P ammo 100 years ago.
 

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Because we don't like cracked frames, and broken lugs.
 

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Many folks/custom buiders are also equipping with their pistols with slightly lighter mainsprings in the interests of lighter trigger pulls, so, a slightly heavier recoil spring will help offset to some degree the lighter mainspring in the recoiling mass/resistance equation.
 

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My nighthawk came with a 17# spring. I have a 18.5# wolff in it now and there is a little change in recoil. The gun has a snappier recoil now and the cases land about five feet behind me now. I shoot mostly reloads. For 230 and 200 grain i use 5.5 grains of 231.
 

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Just out of curiosity, why do I see so many people using 18+ pound recoil springs? It seems the 16 pound spring has worked for over 100 years.

:confused:
Nate
JMB didn't know what he didn't know. He had no idea of how we would be shooting his pistol in the "future". There is no way he could have forseen this.
 

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I use 16# recoil springs and 19# mainsprings. Recoil seems to be less, and the timer confirms it.
Adjusting the edge of the firing pin retainer to lower the mechanical advantage of the slide cocking the hammer is another way to reduce felt recoil.

More of the slides energy goes into cocking, keeping the forces 'within' the gun structure.

Just changing recoil springs to heavier beats up the gun on closing into battery.

More energy stored = more energy released.
 

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Fact of the matter is back in JMB's time springs for the 1911 were not designed with a "poundage" rating.. They were designed with a number of "coils" It worked out to be 14 pounds..
 

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Fact of the matter is back in JMB's time springs for the 1911 were not designed with a "poundage" rating.. They were designed with a number of "coils" It worked out to be 14 pounds..
How about a source link for that information?
 

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Others will agree. Others will disagree. My 5" weapons come from the factory with an 18#. The 4.5" come with a 20# from the factory. Again. My weapons from my makers.

Personally I use 20# springs in all of my guns. I find that they run dirtier longer. But note. All springs get weak. So as I use my pistol more, it gets closer and closer to being a fresh 18# spring.

In the end, you (the OP) has basically stepped in it. There is no answer. Only a myriad of philosophies.

Regards,
Greyson
 
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I can't imagine running 255 grain swc at 900+ fps with a 16-18 lb main spring. 24-26 lbs keeps the pistol from blowing apart. With time people have learned to make tuning changes that suit their personel needs. 1911s are the most versatile pistol anyone can ask for.
 

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Venuto please provide a reference source for that information. I sounds like internet BS, to me. You shoot your 1911 with 14# springs, and I'll continue to use my 20# springs that I have been using for 15 years. I know my 20# springs aren't hurting only helping my 1911. Do you have any barrel link lug peening problems, from the slide slamming into the link lugs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I can't imagine running 255 grain swc at 900+ fps with a 16-18 lb main spring. 24-26 lbs keeps the pistol from blowing apart. With time people have learned to make tuning changes that suit their personel needs. 1911s are the most versatile pistol anyone can ask for.
Why would you run that hot of a load under normal circumstances?

:confused:
Nate
 

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Is he shooting 45 long colt bullets in a 45 acp? I have never heard of bullets over 230 grains in a 45acp. Maybe I'm gonna learn something here?
 
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Why would you run that hot of a load under normal circumstances?

:confused:
Nate
First of all I am not normal.:confused: As a PP load it is devestating. The real use is bowling pin shoots. Power factor of about 230. Pins get real heavy at the shoots end. We use the beat up old pins for shoot offs and they need heavy loads to push them 3 feet off the table. I am usually in the shoot off so I have to be prepared for a heavy stubborn pin. I have come to love my 1911s as they get the job done.
 

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To make an incredibly long story very short, Grayson hit it on the head. It became common to use 18# and up in duty type guns. They assist in keeping high round count guns running more reliably, in adverse conditions for a longer period of time. Remember, JMB's gun had an original service life of about 7000 rounds. In this day and age, that may be the beginning of a training cycle.
Where I disagree with Gray, is that there very much IS an answer to the OP's question. Heavier springs came about for the same reasons all the other modifications were made the old slab sides. None of these mods were made in a vacuum. They were requested, they were questions that were answerd. However, you need to look at all the facts as they pertain to YOU as to which spring you use.
 
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