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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Until today I had never shot a Hi power before. Keeping in mind that shooting a 9mm after a .45 is always a big difference, I found the gun very easy to shoot well. In stock form the trigger is better than I thought it would be. There is a part called the magazine disonnect that renders the gun unfireable if the magazine is not fully seated. Through it's method of action, the safety device also adds a little "creep" to the trigger (so I have read, it is an accepted fact), but it was still very good, if not as perfect as a 1911, or the single action pull of a Sig. I would say it was a bit like the trigger on the XD(m). I will certainly remove the mag disconnect when I pick one up for myself, since it is a useless device that causes more harm than good. That, plus a little more labor of love on the lockwork and think it'll have trigger well worth pulling.
The thumb safety is in almost the same position as the 1911's (if you know the 1911 well, the similarities between the two are everywhere). All the new models have ambi safeties, which I don't really care for. I only need one, but it is flat enough on the right side to not be in the way. Problem is, the one on the left side of the frame is also flat and that one is quite important. Since the speed of bringing a single action firearm into a fight is entirely dependant upon disengaging the safety in a swift manner, an extended thumb safety (as used on the majority of modern 1911's) would be my first modification.
The bore sits low relative to the modern 9mm's I am accustomed to, helping it to feel very controllable. Adding to this feel the gun is an all steel affair, giving it decent heft. These traits coupled with the 9mm cartridge it fires, make it a pleasure to shoot and a cinch for follow-up shots. The width of the pistol is also a factor in its comfort. Even though it is a double stack, it is still fairly slim in the grip and even more so everywhere else. I would have no problem carrying this full size pistol in an IWB holster. The grips and shape of the backstrap make for a very ergonomically satisfying hold.
There are a few things on this gun that I might improve, but even in its totally stock form it gave me a warm fuzzy feeling. I was very pleased to see that this 75 year old gun suited me quite well. With it's classic lines and retro cool factor, there aren't too many pistols that will satisfy on so many levels.

http://www.heirloomprecision.com/photos/Ted_Yost/Signature_Grade_Hi-Power_2007/

http://www.heirloomprecision.com/photos/Ted_Yost/2007_Signature_Grade_Hi-Power/

http://www.fletchercustompistols.com/hipower_beavertail.htm
 

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The Browning Hi Power will always be a "must have" for me. I trained with a M1911A1 in the Army, and carried one during two tours in Vietnam. I discovered the Browning Hi Power while in Vietnam, having liberated one from a NVA officer following an ambush (he didn't need it anymore). During 24 years as a cop I frequently carried the Hi Power, although the 1911-style pistols have always been my personal favorite.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Wow, that is a great collection there Steel!

I too am the kind of guy that puts the 1911 of the top of most lists and it still rises above the Hi Power for a few reasons. One of the things that got me interested in the HP, is something that most people wouldn't worry about. Magazines. The magazine selection for 9mm 1911's is terrible. I won't settle for the 9 rounders and there are only a handful of 10 rounders out there. To tighten that search even more, the pistol I have in my head is either a mini-bob (standard mainspring with the corner chopped), or a true bobtail in commander, or 4in. length. This design does not lend itself well to those silly floorplate designs on the mags I want to use. Wilson Combat ETM mags. I have a .45acp model and the large, flared floorplate looks stupid without a magwell. I would be fine with a bit of the mag sticking out, if they would just minimize it's presence by putting a very slim floor plate that only retains the part that is needed to prevent over-insertion.

Has Anyone changed the floorplate on an ETM mag? If so, to what.
 
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