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I am getting very confused. I am very new to reloading metalic cartridges, (lots of 12 gauge). I have loaded about 700 rounds on my Father-in-laws single stage press and I have to say that it was not all that bad. I was able to reload about 100 rounds per hour (i did not think that was too bad for my first time). The only drawback is that his equipment is 150 miles away and do not get there very often. So I would like to get set up to reload at my place. I am looking for a VERY inexpencive way to get into it. I have seen the Lee Pro 1000 for $125 set up in .45ACP but have heard "do not buy Lee". What is wrong with them? I know what you will say "buy Dillon", my responce is give me the money and I will. So, what has your experience been with the Lee Pro 1000? Are they OK to get started? I am young and this will only have to last me until I get a little older and can afford a Dillon. I shoot an average of 100-200 rounds per week. I need advice!?!

Mark
 

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Mark,

100-200 rds/wk is not chicken feed. I'd save your pennies and go for a Dillon myself. I don't have much Lee experience, except for their factory crimp die (first rate) and their priming tool. I tend to think they get a bum rap.
 

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Originally posted by MarkInND:
I am looking for a VERY inexpencive way to get into it. I have seen the Lee Pro 1000 for $125 set up in .45ACP but have heard "do not buy Lee". What is wrong with them? I know what you will say "buy Dillon", my responce is give me the money and I will. So, what has your experience been with the Lee Pro 1000? Are they OK to get started? I am young and this will only have to last me until I get a little older and can afford a Dillon. I shoot an average of 100-200 rounds per week. I need advice!?!

Mark
Mark, I can understand where your coming from...Of course I'll say "save your money and get a Dillon" but I can also understand that just starting out, the funds may not be there to do that at this time.

There's nothing wrong with the Lee stuff...its just that the Dillon stuff is many times better. I started on a Lee Turret press and loaded rifle and pistol calibers on it for YEARS. It wasn't until I started shooting IPSC and doing a lot of rifle shooting that I realized that the saving in time was invaluable (I work full time and am a part time student so finding a free hour or two is precious time in my book).

On the Lee Turret press, I could load about 250 rounds/hr. On the Dillon, I can do that in about half the time.

So basically the story goes like this....you will more then likely get a Dillon press at some point during your shooting career...it's just a matter of when. With that in mind, you could save yourself money (and possible frustration...I've heard that the Pro can be pretty funky) and just go for the Dillon now...or get yourself a less expensive press like the Turret (probably about $80 with the dies) and start out...Oh get the Delux Auto Disk if you go with the Lee....it makes things a lot easier.
 

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If you are trying to start on a tight buget I suggest you shop the used equipment market. I have seen (and bought) RCBS Rock Chucker presses for pennies on the dollar, and they were in great shape.
 

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My situation was much like yours. I knew I wanted a Dillon; but, the funds were not there. I got the Lee turret press (4 hole)w/Lee dies (incl. factory crimp die), auto-disk power measure, etc. I got it to load .45 Acp and it has been working fine. I'll get a Dillon down the road; but, for now I'm a happy camper. Take care.

P.S. If you get the Lee turret press, you'll probably want to get a hand priming tool like the one that RCBS makes.

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"Quid hoc ad aeternitatem?"
 

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like others, i too was in your same situation. i say, go Lee. i bought a Lee Anniversary kit with their single stage press a year and a half ago and i have been absolutely content. unless you are a high volume shooter, i see no need for the Dillon equipment. i'm sure that Dillon stuff is top notch but i have no need for it.

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"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary security deserve neither liberty nor security."
--Benjamin Franklin--
 

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Most Lee equipment works well, but the 1000 Progressive is dangerous. It tends to blow primers, which, because the primers are lined up in a feed trough next to the case being primed, sets off the whole supply of primers.

For 100-200 rounds per week, any single stage press should serve. And it is best to use a single stage until you are well versed in reloading technique. The single stage press will continue to be useful even after you graduate to a Dillon.
 

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If you go with a Lee make sure you ALWAYS WEAR EYE AND EAR PROTCTION WHEN LOADING. (a good idea w/ any brand, actually). All those primers in an unsheilded magazine are right in your face. Shoot Safe
 

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Mark you're right, the dillon is the best, no doubt about it! (I have a Square deal b and a 550)For 19 years I used a lyman spartan press, that I had bought second hand and it worked well, it got me started,and it loaded many thousands of rounds, Maybe you should look around for a used single stage press,(something like a rcbs rockchucker)Single stage presses are a good place to learn, only one operation at a time,so screw-ups are easy to catch, IF you're paying attention, with most progressives you have 4 operations going on at the same time,and you need to know exactly whats going on at each station...all the time, lots of room for error for a beginner, Later on as you gain experience you'll want to move up to a progressive press, (hint; skip the square deal b, and get a 550)You may want to load for rifle as well, a rockchucker will work fine for this, loading for rifle is a little more complex, case legnths, and over all legnths must be watched, and this is where a single stage press really shines for the beginner it's all just one step at a time, I don't recommend a beginner starting out with a progressive (although many have)simply because there too many things going on at the same time, and its easy to miss something, DO stay away from the lee pro 1000, any press that won't seat primers all the time, and has been known to blow primers, is dangerous in my book, an accident waiting to happen,Start with a single stage, and gain some experience,The Dillons will be ready for you, when you're ready for them.
 

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Mark,

Go to the Dillon site http://dillonprecision.com and look at their options. For $250 or so you can get their Square Deal progreessive press set up for any pistol caliber you want. They have other presses in all price rangers $125 to $1,200+.
 

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Another vote for the Lee turret press with auto-disk powder measure, and a hand held primer tool (Lee or RCBS).
www.leeprecision.com

[This message has been edited by shane45-1911 (edited 08-04-2001).]
 

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What they said. Especially Shane, use a hand priming tool. They separate the priming function to a tool made specially for the task. I just got a Lee hand press also. It uses standard dies and is very small and inexpensive. I intend to make a kit for traveling, including some powder, primers, bullets and the proper dies for my 1911.
 

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there's nothing wrong with lee i use their dies. as far as the presss i was looking into getting one my self, but went with rcbs instead. only because i think the rcbs stuff is build a little better. i would go with the lee turret press w/ auto index. thats what i almosted ended up with.

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Jay
 

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I've trashed my Pro-1000 many times here. It works, but a pain in the ass to keep working smoothly. I'm relatively new to reloading, and got this press for same reasons you're talking about. I have never had any safety (primer explosion or powder charge) problems, I had to shim the plate that hold the dies. It had way too much horizontal and vertical play. Jammed every 4-5 rounds. Works Ok now, but I want a Dillon. Want to buy it?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I want to thank everyone here that gave me some very helpful advice. I decided to stay away from the Lee Pro 1000. I will be getting the Lee 4 hole turret press kit with a cheap scale, powder measure and misc. tools include in the kit for $90 from Midway. I will also be getting the Lee dies and Factory taper crimp dies for both .45ACP and 9mm Luger. I also decided to upgrade the powder measure that is in the kit with an update kit to make it into a deluxe auto disk. All total with press, and 2 sets of dies it will come to $165.

Thank you again,
Mark
 

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Good choice Mark - you should be able to happily load many thousands of rounds with this set-up. Enjoy!
 

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Sounds like you took a good first step. I just finished a few boxes of .223. Reloading is a relaxing thing for me, even if I didn't save money, I would still do it! Have fun.
 

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MarkInND, I think you made a good choice for a beginner setup because I made exactly the same choice earlier this year. I like the Lee turret press and powder measure for the volume I load. One bit of advice, however. Ditch the Lee scale right away. For a month I thought my powder measure was inconsistent until I tried a Hornady scale and found that the measure was rock solid but the scale was unreliable. I purchased my own Hornady scale and have been very happy with it. I wrote a polite note to Lee explaining my problem and never received the courtesy of a reply. Otherwise I have been satisfied with my Lee equipment. Regards.
 

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I bought a used Dillon Square Deal with dies/tool heads in .45 and 9mm, for $175. Hit the gun shows and want-ads.
 
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