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Discussion Starter #1
Ok. Here is the deal. I'm loading .40 S&W. I'm using Speer's 155 gr. TMJ. Their manual says to use 5.8gr min - 6.5gr. max of W231. This seems like a lot to me! My Lyman 47 doesn't list a 155 gr. TMJ to compare to, however, They list a 150 gr. JHP calls for 5.0 gr. of W231. They don't list any loads for W231 in 155 gr. bullet. I don't want an accident, so what should I do?

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[This message has been edited by SMASH45 (edited 11-21-2001).]
 

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I don't understand the physics of the situation myself, but there are some bullets that call for significantly different powder charges than you would expect. In fact, my Speer manual has separate sections for ... Gold Dots, I think. I'd have to look. But it's almost like some bullets are slicker than others and will slide on out easier, which calls for larger powder charges.

If I ever have doubts about a load, I just check another manual. You might want to do that. (My usual source for components has "desk copies" of the major manuals that customers can take a look at if they wish. Your dealer might have something like that if you don't have the manuals yourself.)
 

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I don't have the Speer manual to which you refer, but the manuals I have suggest starting at 5.3 to 5.5 with a maximum load of 6.0 of 231.

The latter is the Winchester maximum, which is a good indicator.

Which Speer manual are you using? I would like to see that load in print.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm using "Speer Reloading Manual - Rifle & Pistol - Number 13" Page 544 if you are interested. I wanted to do some loads tonight, but I'm kinda worried. I only have Lyman's 47th. and This speer manual.



[This message has been edited by SMASH45 (edited 11-21-2001).]
 

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Don't remember exactly where I got it, but use a charge weight of 5.7 grains 231 with a 155 grain plated bullet which works very well for me, with no signs of excessive pressure.

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AZFred
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Some places warn about your gun's chamber fully supporting the case head??? Do Ruger's support it? What does it matter?
 

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Hodgdon Data Manual #26 (1994) shows Win. 231 for 155 gr. Jacketed bullets ranging from 5.1 to 6.0 gr.

The 40 S&W is a high pressure round. Seating depth on the bullet can seriously affect operating pressure. The 40 Smith is essentially a "short" version of the 10mm, and the case capacity is pretty critical with respect to seating depth and operating pressures.

You can check your chamber for "support" by removing the barrel and dropping a live round into the breech. Check the feed ramp to see how far it cuts under the case and into the web. My spec drawing doesn't show the web thickness for the 40 Smith. The other "support" issue to look at is how tight the case fits in the breech.

Glocks are "throated" and the case fits very loose in the breech. Makes for nifty feeding, but poor support of the brass. Also, the Glock feed ramp is cut deeply for feeding reliability. That's why Glock voids it's warranty for reloads, and why most powder mfgs. warn about "unsupported" or "partially supported" chambers. It's about as close as they can get to saying "Glock" without getting sued.

The 40 can be a fussy round to reload. Seating depth is critical. Ensuring that the bullet is adequately crimped into the brass so it doesn't seat deeper from recoil while it's in the magazine is important.

Personally, I like bulkier powders for the 40 Smith . . . like Hodgdon HS-6 or HS-7. These powders burn slower and develop a flatter pressure spike. Accordingly, they use about twice as much powder -- up to 9.8 grs. for 155 gr. bullets. A flatter pressure spike is safer when shooting semi-autos with partially supported chambers.

Still, the 40 is one of the BIG culprits in Glocks blowing the web out of reloaded brass.

I sold my 40 Glock and got a fully supported chamber in a .357 magnum S&W K frame revolver. 45 ACP is a lower pressure caliber for reloading.

But people reload the 40 Smith all the time. And the load books provide data.

Oh yeah, most reload component mfgs. provide load data online. M.D. Smith also has a reloading page:
http://www.reloadammo.com/
www.accuratereloading.com is mostly for rifles but a good reference too.



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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks Genghis! I decided to try loading 20 rounds and I labled each of the 2 batches of 10 I made. I used two separate recipes. I'll let everybody know how it went. Thanks for the info.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I loaded one batch with 5.7 gr and one batch with 6.1 gr. They both shot tighter groups than my winchester factory 180 gr. The 5.7 had a very nice recoil and was accurate. I think this will be my load from now on. No case bulge on any of the cases and my Ruger didn't have any problems. A GREAT DAY at the Range!! Happy Thanksgiving!
 
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