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That's funny right there. If a Hi Point costs 200 then snobbery begins at 300. I don't own a Hi Point but the people that do own them seem to like them.
No, you missed the point. $300 wont get you reliability either. Now, the topic of used guns of proven functionality for cheap is something to consider. I wouldn’t consider a person with a $500 weapon a snob either, I would call them stupid if they are putting whatever that is up against the next level.
 

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. I was pretty impressed when Hipoint was able to make a durable zamak 40s&w work with those operating pressures.
40 Short and Weak has the same operating pressure as 9mm.
 

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.40 Look at me I'm a .45 generates about the same pressure as a 9mm, but the pressure curve is a lot steeper. That's why a lot of early .40 pistols that were nothing but re-barreled 9mms had durability issues until the companies took the time to beef them up slightly.
 

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I've still got a G2c.. Replace the rod and firing-pin guide and go. Works great - every time.
I did the same thing, and added a Sig P226 18-round mag. My Taurus mags were not reliable. I got a 3D-printed spacer off eBay for just this application (eBay vender is bloody_wheels).

I also have a SCCY CPX2. It does the job, spits out bullets and reliable, but I prefer the Taurus. My G2C has night sights BTW, which is what intrigued me about it. About $50 more. To me the SCCY is just a truck gun, or a loaner.
 

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40 Short and Weak has the same operating pressure as 9mm.
yup... your right. I guess its the larger projectile in combination with the high pressure that batters up pistols so much. Still impressive Hipoint does it with a Zamak blowback.

I remember a while back about a Guy running 45 super through his Hipoint... 50 rounds or so with a normal recoil spring. He stated that it showed no abnormal signs of wear. Now... I would not try that but its interesting. Key to all this is slide weight.

Hipoint 45acp slide weight comes in around 1lb 10oz. Its a massive chunk of zamak. All the hipoints are like this. Its how they get away with unlocked barrels on the bigger pistol calibers and keep durability. Its also why they have a different feel when shooting...more of a cachunk. The slides are not the weak points as much as the barrels are and those typically go at least 10,000 rounds or so before they get loose. They will still function even then though.

These guns get bashed all the time on the net but IMO they deserve respect as does the company for the way they take care of the consumer. I see them as tools for the most part. They will handle many different loads reliabley ranging from powder puff to +p+ and keep on chuggin along once they are dialed in. I have always been suprised there are not aftermarket threaded barrels as I can see them being great for suppressor hosts. I built a C9 a long time ago from different generation components (early C9 had a heavier slide) and ran a case of 9mm Hirzenburger (spelling?) though it. No problems.

Personally I see them as great woods guns along with range shooters. You can run almost any load in them and they can operate under the harshest conditions due to the design and construction. There are no slide rails or locking lugs to get full of sand and create malfunction. The guns are pretty well sealed in terms of operating parts and the parts count itself is very low. No worries about scratching or rusting etc. They will go thousands of rounds without cleaning. The CF380 is one of the most underated guns in terms of female shooters. They shoot extremely soft and are easy to rack for females. The magazines have weak springs and are also easy for females new to firearms.

There are some tricks for getting these running better mostly in the barrel area. The barrel itself is very, very strong. The weak point is in the zamak barrel housing/feedramp which is zamak. I dont advise agressive profile hollowpoint ammo as it can tear up the feedramp. You can polish the feedramp but they are better left alone. The epoxy paint they use is tough stuff and protects the feedramp. The barrels are dipped at the factory and it helps to get the paint out of the barrel as there is typically some in there. They also benefit from a decent crown as the factory job is pretty crude if there is one. Light polishing of the chamber also helps.

Other than that the magazines are pretty weak. They get away with it being single stacks though. There is no heat treating on the 9mm and 45acp magazines so sometimes they will need to be brought back into spec.... unless you go aftermarket....especially on the 9mm factory mags. I customized my cf380 magazines with spacers because they use the same magazine as the 9mm and while they work ... there is a lot of extra space in the magazine.

The triggers can also be improved a little but its best to leave things like sear springs alone. If anything a stronger sear spring would be beneficial. You can get rid of a lot of the trigger spongy slop they have though.

Now... I dont ccw these but some people do. I have warned people on the net and in person that if you do keep it chamber empty. The safety works but is held in position by a nub on the grip which can wear. This can be improved with a small round headed screw expoxied in place but I still wouldnt trust it 100% The fireing pin also serves as the ejector so that can pose an issue that needs to be realized. would I feel underarmed with one as a CCW.... not at all but there are much better options. My feelings are some people carry these just because they want to and that all. Thats fine... I carry pistols that many here would find strange so its all just personal preference, desire, or just plain old gun nerd stuff.
 

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I did the same thing, and added a Sig P226 18-round mag. My Taurus mags were not reliable. I got a 3D-printed spacer off eBay for just this application (eBay vender is bloody_wheels).

I also have a SCCY CPX2. It does the job, spits out bullets and reliable, but I prefer the Taurus. My G2C has night sights BTW, which is what intrigued me about it. About $50 more. To me the SCCY is just a truck gun, or a loaner.
nothing wrong with Sccys once they run. They are based off the Keltec p11 which started a revolution in the gun industry for the most part. Probably one of the five most infuential designs in the last 30 years. I dont think they stand up to the p11 but they are a decent clone. Taurus G2c is a solid pistol as well. I kind of wish they would not have dropped it and went to the G3c.
 

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.40 Look at me I'm a .45 generates about the same pressure as a 9mm, but the pressure curve is a lot steeper. That's why a lot of early .40 pistols that were nothing but re-barreled 9mms had durability issues until the companies took the time to beef them up slightly.
LOL.... and then they still had durability issues. I like 40s&w (one of my favorites) but the gun manufacturers really screwed up rushing things to the market not understanding the round. The only ones that seemed to get it right early were S&W and Ruger. It wasnt until pistols were built around the 40s&w that it really started to shine.
 

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nothing wrong with Sccys once they run. They are based off the Keltec p11 which started a revolution in the gun industry for the most part. Probably one of the five most influential designs in the last 30 years. I dont think they stand up to the p11 but they are a decent clone. Taurus G2c is a solid pistol as well. I kind of wish they would not have dropped it and went to the G3c.
Agreed, both are reliable. The SCCY just feels weird in my hand, and I am pretty adaptable as to my hold.
 

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I used to have a SCCY. Reliable gun and great customer service by the manufacturer. I only sold it because the large, blocky grip was 10x worse than even a Glock.
 

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When I first got out of the service and got my first civilian tax refund, I didn't buy a cheap pistol, I got a combat commander in electroless nickel. Looking back on it, I would've done better with a Hi Point had they been available. The Colt was useless to me when I had to pawn it each month to cover the necessities as an old school payday loan. There must be a safe, functional cheap pistol for someone to get in on the ground floor with. These days, it's the Hi Point. You know there are worse pistols.
 

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I bought a used 9mm HiPoint years ago.

I couldn't take it apart because the roll pin was not going to come out with a standard hammer and punch - rollpin was peened out into the slide.

The other negative and what hardly anyone ever mentions is the concussive slap that you get with them. It felt like shooting a 10mm+P instead of a 9mm, not from a recoil standpoint, but the shock that went through the grip into your hand.

I took it back to the pawn shop and got my hundred bucks back for those two reasons.

It was reliable and reasonably accurate. It wasn't enough fun to shoot to not have a $100 bill in my pocket.
 

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Blowback-operated handguns always have a much harsher recoil than locked-breech designs. I briefly owned a Bersa Thunder that stung the palm of my hand whenever I fired it, and that was only a .380!
 

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I had a poor but honest client come home and throw his 9mm HiPoint on the bed. When it went off the bullet went through a testicle (I kid you not. My God that must have hurt.) and out the window in a Michigan city that will remain nameless. My role was to convince the Concealed Weapons Board not to revoke his license. I was successful. The woman prosecutor wanted to pull his ticket but the male cops on the board figured he suffered enough.
 

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Blowback-operated handguns always have a much harsher recoil than locked-breech designs. I briefly owned a Bersa Thunder that stung the palm of my hand whenever I fired it, and that was only a .380!
Ever shot a Radom P-64? Most punishing recoil impulse of any semi-auto I've ever fired.
 

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Ever shot a Radom P-64? Most punishing recoil impulse of any semi-auto I've ever fired.
I will have to agree with you on that. I fired 50 rounds through mine and had some hide missing and a pretty sore hand. That little thing is rough. My .44 mag. is nothing compared to the P64.
 

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I will have to agree with you on that. I fired 50 rounds through mine and had some hide missing and a pretty sore hand. That little thing is rough. My .44 mag. is nothing compared to the P64.
Makarov pistols are like that. Wonderful pistols with lots of fans ( I own 2-Bulgarian and East German), but that blow-back design delivers a sharp recoil.:):)
 

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Ever shot a Radom P-64? Most punishing recoil impulse of any semi-auto I've ever fired.
I shot a detonics pocket 9 when I was a teenager and that was harsh. Intratec cat9 was another one. Those were both blowbacks. The Detonics had a slight delay. Nothing I couldnt handle but not something I would want to plink away with all the time. I never felt the Hipoints were uncomfortable.... just different. Probably the most uncomfortable area is the slippery grips but thats an easy fix.

Like I said they are tools.... cheap blasters that are reliable and accurate. Strong pistols that can take a lot of abuse or neglect and still function. Things like P64s are works of art in comparison. Hi-point is like my kids drawing a picture with crayons. They work as designed but I wouldnt make a comparison to them with traditional firearms. Its like comparing a Raven P25 to a Beretta 950bs.

Another thing with hipoints is because they are so simple I have never encountered a lemon. Not even the old pre-hipoint Stallards... they just worked. Back before hi-point When 40s&w was very new I bought an Iberia along with a case of ammo because I wanted to try the new 40. The Iberia had a bare non anodized painted aluminum frame. I figured it would crack ..... never did. Nor did the slide. Big ... heavy.... clunky....But they work.
 

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There's better stuff out there, for close to the same money. That said, Hi-Point is far better than Bersa, Jiminez, and a dozen other pot metalists, with no warranty.

IMO, where Hi-Point really shines, besides their faultless warranty, is their carbines.
 

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There's better stuff out there, for close to the same money. That said, Hi-Point is far better than Bersa, Jiminez, and a dozen other pot metalists, with no warranty.

IMO, where Hi-Point really shines, besides their faultless warranty, is their carbines.
Bersa??? Those are real firearms. S&W has made more potmetal and Zamak guns that Bersa.

The carbines are solid. I liked them more before they turned them into tactical nightmare wannabees. They used to be nice and streamlined.... The 10mm carbine is a really nice rifle though.
 

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Bersa??? Those are real firearms. S&W has made more potmetal and Zamak guns than Bersa...
Yeah, Bersas may not be everyone's cup of tea, but they're not Zamak guns. I have an old Bersa 383A (predecessor of the Thunder 380), and it's still a great shooter. Definitely not made of pot metal.

I do own one Zamak gun. It's a Jennings J-22 that I bought way back in 1985. Believe it or not, it runs well after some slight extractor modification, and I've grown sort of attached to the little thing. It's cute, which is at least one advantage that it has over a Hi-Point.

With some smart shopping, even a quality new gun can often be found at prices that come very close to that of a new Hi-Point. A month or 2 ago, CDNN was selling Walther Creeds for $299. I need another 9mm like I need a hole in the head, but even I was tempted at that price.
 
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