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I think your picture is upside down. Inverting it, the bottom line seems to read: FN HP/GP

The last characters of the first line read as TN to me. Possibly an importer from Tennessee?

* Looking again, that top line seems to read:

[ XX KNOX TN ]with the first two characters unreadable to me. There is/was an importer in Knoxville, TN. I don’t recall the name right now.

After a quick google search, I believe the first characters are TGI for Tennessee Guns Inc.

The entire string reads:

TGI KNOX TN
FN HP/GP


Cheers,

Tim
 

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I believe it is Tennessee Guns International. I know they used to import FEGs, as Jaypee referenced the importer in his book on Decoding the FEG Hi Power.

Decoding the FÉG Hi-Power: Paregien, Jerry, Frazier, G. M.: 9781495488368: Amazon.com: Books

Also found this interesting ATF notice on TGI
Former Owner/President of Tennessee Guns International, INC. Sentenced in U.S. District Court | Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives
Former Owner/President of Tennessee Guns International, INC. Sentenced in U.S. District Court
KNOXVILLE, Tenn. – On Thursday, Mar. 27, 2014, Charles M. Jones III, former owner and president of Tennessee Guns International, Inc. (TGI), was sentenced in U.S. District Court to serve one year of probation and 100 hours of community service as a result of his felony conviction for importation of goods (firearms) by false statements. Jones pleaded guilty to the offense pursuant to a plea agreement last December. The plea agreement also resulted in TGI forfeiting and relinquishing several thousand firearms and firearms parts that were seized from TGI. Significantly, Jones can no longer possess a firearm, since he is now a convicted felon. “It is extremely important that firearms dealers abide by the law in conducting their business, in order to prevent those who are not authorized under law to possess firearms, from obtaining guns and weapons,” said U.S. Attorney William C. Killian. Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) Special Agent in Charge Jeffrey Fulton stated, “This conviction and sentence is a reminder that smuggling firearms by a Federal Firearms Licensee into the U.S. is a serious matter and will be vigorously investigated and prosecuted.” “Firearms regulations exist to ensure weapons crossing international borders are properly accounted for to preserve public safety,” said Special Agent in Charge of Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) New Orleans Raymond R. Parmer Jr. “This case shows the significant consequences awaiting individuals who attempt to illegally import weapons and who make false claims while attempting to do so.” Parmer oversees a five-state area of operations to include Tennessee, Alabama, Arkansas, Louisiana and Mississippi. The conviction was the result of a long-term investigation conducted by ATF, and HSI. Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Todd Martin, as well as Assistant U.S. Attorneys Jeff Theodore and Frank Dale, represented the United States.
Nashville Field Division
 

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As suggested above....US importers of foreign military/government surplus H-P's often used the underside of the hood to add the ATF required importers identification information. I know that there was at least one US importer who used this sort of '..dot print..' method and this location on the underside of the H-P hoods...but for the life of me, at the moment I can't remember which one. No doubt someone here has one of their surplus pistols, with their importer's marking, in their collection as I type.
 

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Forget what year BAFTE started the requirement for importer markings to be standardized using the 'dot matrix'. Basically, characters are made using a computer-controlled 'point' (center punch) driven into the steel at small intervals in the shape of the number/letter. It can get ugly if the steel is very hard or the point gets damaged.
 
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