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High mount thumb safety grip...or how it's not working for me.....

2238 Views 10 Replies 9 Participants Last post by  SAWBONES
I'd like to be able to use a high thumb (on top of the safety) grip to help minimize recoil and further my control of the weapon, but no matter what I seem to do, it generates intermittant grip safety issues preventing firing while dry-firing and at the range....something I cannot chance to actual use while carrying.

I have medium/large sized hands btw, and all my 1911's have a BT with a good sized protrusion on the bottom, all have differing high mount safeties...and I have this problem with all of them. I purchased a Wilson wedge MSH in the thinking it would help this over my flat MSH's, and while I like it very much indeed, still the same thing happens. I have no similar problems whatsoever using a low grip (my default).

My thinking is a mid/low mount safety, but other than the (unfinished geez) low-mount Gunsite ones sold at Brownells for $41, these seem to be like fairy dust: not really exisiting outside custom makers who don't sell them unless it's in conjunction with having major work done (which I understand btw).

Is there any other suppliers out there? Does anyone use one for carrying purposes and is there any problems impacting your holster's safety detent area with it?

Chris
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Welcome to the 1911 catch-22; get the best possible grip for firing, and there's no guarantee the gun will fire. I'd been shooting a 1911 for years, without trouble, but as soon as I started competing with one, I had to pin the grip safety, or the gun didn't fire on about 25% of my draws/grips. Even speed-bump grip safeties don't help, so I pin 'em all. Is the grip safety such a comfort that you'd compromise your shooting to accommodate it?
 

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I had one of the low mount thumb safeties a while back. They are comfortable, you must shoot thumb on thumb since it's low. Very awkward shooting left handed, if that's an issue for you!

It would be nice if "they" offered high, medium and low thumb safeties.

But, I have the same problem as you. One of my 1911's has an EB beavertail that was "tuned" by a knowledgable 1911 "guy" that clears the trigger bow with very little movement. That seems to work for me, but the one I shoot all the time is modified a "different way".
And I'm one that can go into a gun shop, handle various 1911's and can't release the trigger. :)

An alternative that many people do...they carry another design that doesn't have the silly and useless grip safety. That's harsh...but!
 

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I would also like to know where I might be able to find a low riding safety. I try to grip the gun right and it engages the safety, I don't want to do this if I actually need to fire my weapon.
 

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Two possible solutions:

(1) Gunsite low thumb safety (also made from scratch by Ted Yost and Robar, perhaps more.

(2) Novak one-piece backstrap, replaces the separate mainspring housing and eliminates the unnecessary grip safety.

Or perhaps both?:)

And then there's the aforementioned suggestions to find another design that didn't have a grip safety to begin with.
 

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I have the same issue.
An arched or wedge MSH WON'T help, since it helps elevate your palm AWAY from the grip safety.

Two fairly good solutions:
1.) Get your gunsmith to build (braze on) an even higher shelf on the grip safety. I had this done with a Colt Gunsite CCO grip safety before refinishing the frame, and you can't even tell by looking that anything's been done, but the GS releases reliably now.
2.) Get Novak's new "The Answer" unitary backstrap.

Three not-as-good solutions:
1.) Pin the GS (liability issues).
2.) Get the Gunsite low-mount thumb safety (funny-lookin')
3.) Change your grip so that you no longer shoot "high thumb". This is the least desireable solution IMO, since it's too slow to change from thumb atop the safety to thumb below the safety when you draw, plus with the thumb below the safety there's always a tendency for the thumb to kick the lever up inadvertently.
 

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I'd still like to see a single example cited, to support the "liability" theory? If I shoot something intentionally, then the grip safety plays no part in it. If I shoot something accidentally, then my negligence is the reason, pinned grip safety or no (and, since the grip safety only comes into play when the gun isn't being held by anyone, I'm not sure when the grip safety performs its function? When you drop it? I have a hammer block in case the gun lands on its muzzle, and grip safety in case it lands on the butt? I'll just hold onto it, I think . . .). If you absolutely have to shoot something, and the grip safety prevents you from doing so, just how "safe" is it?
 

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You may also want to talk to Ned Christiansen about his two piece grip safety setup.

http://www.m-guns.com/

Don't forget that a low thumb safety will put your right hand thumb lower and therefore your support hand lower on the grip. This will reduce your ability to control recoil somewhat. Also shooting the gun left handed can be a problem if your hand hits the lower safety.

You are not alone. This is a common problem. Good luck in your search for a workable solution.
 

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Chuck Rogers makes a custom mid-position safety on occasion. This isn't as funny looking as the Gunsite low mount, nor is it low enough to get knocked on accidentally when shooting support hand only.
Rosco commented in the past that the ugly grip safeties with the dorsal fin are very effective at ensuring that hte grip safety is disengaged.
 

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"I'd still like to see a single example cited, to support the 'liability' theory?"

I'm not aware of any, though I know nothing of the history of case law regarding personal defense shootings.

The point isn't precedent, though, but rather the likelihood that the opposing attorney will attempt to characterize the shooter with the disabled GS as "reckless", and having "wanton disregard" for life, safety and all things virtuous, thereby ipugning his credibility as a "good guy". Sure, it's BS, but that's exactly what attorneys do.
OTOH, if you can plainly articulate WHY it was necessary that you pinned the GS, your own attorney should be able to use the explanation in your defense, but better still if the argument couldn't be raised at all.
 
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